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rllmuk

Death's Head

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  • Interests
    Long walks. Reading.

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  1. Absolutely - those effects and the old liquid-metal swirly pool from Mario 64 used to entrance me for ages. I was coming to the N64 off the back of a Mega Drive so my awe is at least vaguely understandable!
  2. I think the pair of them are two of the finest performers working in Britain, and that's leaving aside their writing talents.
  3. Yeah, the PAL version was like watching a slideshow sometimes, especially in four player! I fired it up in Project 64 not long ago and it was a revelation!
  4. It was particularly the weapon models and effects that impressed me. First time I fired off that fusion cannon I was like, blimey! And you're right, there was always a nice sheen to their stuff even if, like Turok 2, it was a little ambitious and slowed the poor N64 down to a chug. Forsaken, in particular, is a game that only really functions as it should nowadays, when emulated!
  5. It was the second game I got for the N64 and I don't think I've ever played it properly - just used the cheats and fucked around blowing things up. The graphics melted my face back in the day, fog aside.
  6. Surely a triple-bill would be three Mighty Ducks movies?
  7. When 7 of 9 was all "I want Picard to still have hope" I was like "what about the audience?"
  8. I'm very tempted to rewatch just so I can wonder what was in the water back in 2006... (oestrogen according to Jack, if I recall rightly!)
  9. I'm thirsty for DS9 references so I'll take that, but I will need more in future.
  10. Well punk was basically 'three chords and the truth' and we got some great tunes out of it. I suppose I'm just very much against the whole 'real instruments = real music' thing. I'm not too bothered how the sausages are made, just how tasty they are! Well the definition of pop changes over time. In the time of the Beatles rhythm and blues was pop; rock became 'pop'. In the 90s UK garage was pop. Again, in the Manual there's a fascinating chapter that I can't recall at all now where they talk about genre songs reaching number one and then effectively 'leaving' their genre and becoming something new. I should re-read it because it was very interesting!
  11. Literally all that stuff is still out there. No one cares about the charts any more. I think that's pretty cool?
  12. Everyone here should read KLF's The Manual - it's a real eye opener into the line between commercialism and art in pop music, and how really that line doesn't matter too much if you've got people up dancing.
  13. Don't forget that even then, when they were starting out, the Beatles and the Stones (and other mod bands of the era including the Who and the Faces) were just covering the music of black American groups before they started doing their own thing. They were R & B bands before becoming 'pop bands'.
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