Jump to content
rllmuk

Stopharage

Moderators
  • Content Count

    1,286
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Cheers for the link @Gaz. I had the best cocktail of my life in Death & Co. Then LCD Soundsystem played over the speakers. Then James Murphy walked in. It was one of the best nights of my life; felt like being in a New York-set movie. Now off to work out which cocktail it was and make it, if I have the ingredients (highly doubtful).
  2. Cross-post from the Kindle thread The Age of Football: The Global Game in the 21st Century by David Goldblatt is 99p today only. This is an absolute steal if you're vaguely interested in football. This is a wonderfully researched and well written account of the pervasive nature of football on our lives and its impact across cultures. This bit from Amazon gives you a feel for what it's about:- "In The Age of Football, David Goldblatt charts football’s global cultural ascent, its economic transformation and deep politicization, taking in prison football in Uganda and amputee football in Angola, the role of football fans in the Arab Spring, the footballing presidencies of Bolivia’s Evo Morales and Turkey’s Recep Erdogan, China’s declared intention to both host and win the World Cup by 2050, and the FIFA corruption scandal." I'm half way through it now and it's been superb. Can't recommend this enough.
  3. The Age of Football: The Global Game in the Twenty-First Century by David Goldblatt is 99p. This is an absolute steal if you're vaguely interested in football. This is a wonderfully researched and well written account of the pervasive nature of football on our lives and its impact across cultures. This bit from Amazon gives you a feel for what it's about:- "In The Age of Football, David Goldblatt charts football’s global cultural ascent, its economic transformation and deep politicization, taking in prison football in Uganda and amputee football in Angola, the role of football fans in the Arab Spring, the footballing presidencies of Bolivia’s Evo Morales and Turkey’s Recep Erdogan, China’s declared intention to both host and win the World Cup by 2050, and the FIFA corruption scandal." I'm half way through it now and it's been superb. Can't recommend this enough. Going to pop this in the football thread too.
  4. @Jamie John, what about The Council? Think it's a fiver on XB1 now, not sure about on PSN. I really enjoyed it, although I would consider it flawed in a few areas. Basically, you go to an island to look for your mother, meet a load of famous historical figures and try to get to the bottom of a mystery which involves political machinations, the occult, scientific discoveries and a range of puzzles.
  5. I would have thought the best fit for what you’re after would be The Dark Pictures Anthology: Man of Medan. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OQvo4-Ly-sA
  6. Can't help you I'm afraid. However, if you ever feel the urge to read a bit of Wild West fiction, Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy is superb.
  7. You know that we're truly living in the shitty timeline when the thought of Zack Snyder improving anything is championed by any functioning human. I mean, I'll obviously lap up more of this nonsense and regret it after, because I never learn.
  8. 18. Stranger Than We Can Imagine: Making Sense of the Twentieth Century by John Higgs This was a really good read. Higgs tries to capture the vast change that mankind went through in the 20th Century, focusing on the growth of individualism and the death of the omphalos. He looks at how the world of art changed, how science changed our understanding of reality, how conflict came to characterise our existence and much more. I'm doing it an awful disservice in this description but it's genuinely interesting, highly informative and engaging throughout. 19. Cold Storage by David Koepp It was a sunny day yesterday, so after shifting two tonnes of soil I decided to savour the weather and read a pacy thriller. From the screenwriter of Jurassic Park and Carlito's Way, so thought it would at least be mildly diverting; nonsensical bubblegum for the brain, if you want. Well, it's utter bilge. Just rubbish. Dull, hackneyed characters. A plot that doesn't really do an awful lot. An intro which is around a fifth of the book. Plot devices that are mind bogglingly dumb. To give you an idea of how shit it is, there is a point where two characters who work in a self-storage centre hear that an alarm is going in the facility. An alarm they've never been aware of. They manage to find out that something is triggering the alarm which is 4 floors below the facility they work at. They dismantle two different walls, crack open a manhole cover, go down four floors through a ladder in a small tube before eventually arriving where the alarm notification is coming from. They only think to Google any of the information and acronyms they see when they are on their way back up. It's utter guff. Nothing really happens. It's utterly dumb. I feel ashamed to have persevered with it for so long. Will now have to cleanse myself with something decent.
  9. Deliver Us The Moon 4/10 I normally like these fairly gentle walkathons but found this too soporific. There were some annoying, haywire electrics parts. The plot didn’t make an awful lot of sense and the puzzles were perfunctory.
  10. He was on a recent episode of Und’r The Cosh podcast and came across as a lovely guy. Good on him got coming out and publicising the impact of those taunts.
  11. Yep, I gameshare with a mate. You need both profiles on your PS4. If your friend buys it, go onto their profile on your PS4 and dl the purchased game. Then, it will appear on the PS4 on your account. Here
  12. 17. On The Beach by Nevil Shute The fallout (literal and metaphorical) of a war has devastating impact on the world. The book focuses on one of the areas which are last to be impacted by the ramifications of the conflict. It’s a weird mix of people getting on with daily life and it’s mundanity whilst also having to adapt to the foreboding and imminent tragic future. The main characters are all very well fleshed out and there’s a haunting quality that runs throughout. I enjoyed it although there are a few lulls in places.
  13. Brighton are a pretty decent community minded club, so I’m not to surprised at the choices offered. They do seem to do a fair amount in the community with some genuinely innovative policies. Both manager and owner are pretty savvy to boot. I’ve been considering getting a couple of season tickets there.
  14. If you like football then The Age of Football by David Goldblatt is absolutely superb. Adam Buxton’s Ramble Book, Louus Theroux’s Gotta Het Theroux This and The End Is Always Near by Dan Carlin have all been recent things I’ve enjoyed. What kind of stuff do you normally enjoy?
  15. It’s weird in that it’s a bit of both of those things. I mean, I don’t want to say too much as you’ve not read it yet. I think your thinking is in line with mine prior to reading it. There are periods in the books where you forget the underlying tension and existential threat for pages. Then something is dropped into the prose that reminds you what the book is about. The sudden bluntness and shattering of the mundane is really effective.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.