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    Games. And many more stuff. I particularly enjoy reading long books about story analysis, characterization, etc. Yup. My life is super interesting.

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  1. I never said that CP's world building is better than W3. W3 remains the most accomplished open world ever along with RDR2. And Novigrad is the best city ever, as a whole. Bit NC is more convincing as a real place because of the architecture. Also, I don't get the issue with the NPCs. Bugs aside, they are as stupid as the general NPC in GTAs. RDR2 only wins in this department because of its incredible wildlife simulation.
  2. CP's world building is on another level. H2 is just a game world in my eyes, like the Ubisoft worlds. CP feels like a real place and the writing -especially compared to H2- is also on another level. Everyone feels like a real person, same style more or less like the W3.
  3. The whole "empty planet" thing seems a bit weird. I get the point but its also weird. First of all, we don't have to have every planet to be a quest hub with interesting civilizations, etc. That would actually make little sense from a design perspective. Secondly, planets can be "empty" in the same way No Man's Sky's planets are "empty", but full of resources to mine, wild life to record, etc. Thirdly, we are forgetting about the procedural generation systems that can provide quests, buildings for exploration, etc. If they are just a small improvement over Skyrim I will be happy. Last but not least, very few of us will actually visit all the planets. The number of planets is so high in order to provide a different experience and exploration for as many players as possible, share info and notes about discoveries etc. And we will have crews to send to their deaths when we are bored as well. Give me more planets, I say.
  4. I highly doubt Sony is in a position to spend 3-5 billion just as a defensive move. On the other hand, they already own 18,6% of the company, don’t they?
  5. Yeah, can't say I disagree, especially on what you say about TR. It just seems that they have done quite good and I really think a western developer wouldn't just get rid of them because they are not... perfoming well. It just seems that the price is low for the portfolio and the inclusion of studios like Crystal Dynamics. In a way it seems like they thought these series should be selling tens of millions per title, which is way too unrealistic. I think they have simply decided to stop competing in the western AAA market, which frankly I don't find it crazy at all.
  6. Matsuda, on TR "failed" launch period of 3,9m copies, 4 years ago:
  7. The last 3 TR games have sold more than 38m copies and the last two Deus Ex more than 12m. I'd say "consistently underperforming" is way off the mark.
  8. Nah, hyperbole would be "its probably the most stunning achievement ever".
  9. I think he named some heroes and from them the bosses were created?
  10. Fair point, but the generic NPCs in open worlds are there to enhance the atmosphere, nothing more. An inhabited open world like W3 or RDR2 would look silly with no NPCs. I personally still remember the first time I saw Beauclair or Skellige Islands, so the W3 has plenty of moments like that as well. For an open world it doesn't lack awe, although ER has a greater effect because the imagination in the art has practically no limits, unlike in the more traditional open world games which usually need to follow a cultural or historical theme.
  11. And he didn't even need Martin to do anything.
  12. I never compared W3 and Elden Ring directly as games, I just compared their open worlds. Maybe you missed some of my posts?
  13. I am trying to shit on a game that I have already said its a stunning achievement and I am having a good time playing it? It is prettly clear who is obsessively against any view that doesn't support ER as the second coming.
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