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Miner Willy

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Everything posted by Miner Willy

  1. Epic name drop: I once trained with him during the period where he was getting labelled a flop at Newcastle. His technique was amazing: I can still distinctly remember him taking shots from 20+ yards and hitting the top corners over and over again.
  2. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    US Open Draw is out, and while everyone seems to think a Djokovic slam is close to inevitable, I'm actually thinking he won't even reach the final. I'm going with Medvedev to beat Zverev in the final. Would LOVE to see Murray beat Tsitsipas.
  3. Pretty sure I bought it on DVD years ago and then ended up giving it to charity before I ever watched it.
  4. I'm certain it was previously pushed back to 22 at one point, as I remember discussing it with a friend who's also a fan. But anyway, it's good news regardless.
  5. It's not traditional fantasy, but I know a few people here are fans of Senlin Ascends and the other Books of Babel. I just noticed that the final installment, Fall of Babel - which I'm sure was previously delayed to 2022 - now has an earlier release date of 9 November.
  6. Has anyone managed to circumvent Audible's region locking? There's a book I've wanted for a while that's not available on the UK store and I've been trying and failing to buy it from the US store. A reddit guide suggested I could just change the address on my stored card to a US one, and then US library titles would be visible when searching, but that doesn't seem to work for me.
  7. Yeah, I saw that but I'd previously bought it in a sale. Certainly don't begrudge paying for it at all though!
  8. 44. Cage of Souls by Adrian Tchaikovsky. I thought this was OK - interesting enough as Tchaikovsky always is, but I didn't think it was among his best work, and found the Audible narrator pretty annoying. 45. Calling Bullshit. Recommended on Rllmuk, I think in one of the Covid/misinformation threads. Definitely worth a read. 46. We Die Alone by David Howarth. True story of pretty incredible personal endurance in WW2. 47. I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith. Enjoyable narration, but not really my sort of thing. Not sure how it landed on my Kindle - probably a deal of the day impulse buy. 48. The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel. Posted earlier in the thread. I loved this. 49. Many Different Kinds of Love by Michael Rosen. Account of Rosen's battle with Covid. Some genuinely moving parts and unsurprisingly some pretty horrible sections describing the challenges he's faced. 50. A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson. Really enjoyable Audlble sale purchase. I do like a bit of popular science as I find this stuff fascinating and often need it dumbing down. Previously:
  9. Excellent - I look forward to your usual brilliant photo diary!
  10. Two of the three tickets above have been sold (to a Rllmuk forumite). I still have one remaining if anyone wants it - just drop me a PM if so!
  11. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    Yeah, it's worrying and his statement was pretty downbeat. I guess the good news is that it confirms his commitment: you don't go through a surgery knowing you'll be away for "many months" if you're not planning to come back and compete. Probably Australia will be too soon, so I assume we're looking at a clay comeback with a view to peaking for Wimbledon - so much like the plan was this year. Very much hoping we get at least one more season of competitive tennis out of Federer and Murray. I'm less concerned about Nadal: his seems no worse than he's had to deal with on many occasions previously, and I'm certain he'll be a contender through next year's clay season at least.
  12. Is anyone else going to Meatopia this year? I'm going with a friend on the Saturday, having rolled over our tickets from last year. It feels a bit strange as, while I've not exactly been a hermit for the past 16 months, I've also not done much at all by way of eating/drinking out. It's a pretty outdoorsy event though, and I'm very much hoping they've been sensible in terms of numbers. If anyone is interested in going, we've got three Saturday tickets going spare as one guy has ruptured his cruciate and has the op the day before, and two were due to come over from the US, which isn't happening for obvious reasons. Tickets are entry only, but early birds so you get in half an hour early (so more access to meat). I said I'd see if I can find takers for them (say, £30 each) - give me a shout if interested.
  13. I just finished The Glass Hotel and remembered your post. I loved it - I think I actually preferred it to Station Eleven, though they're both great and obviously very different books.
  14. Sorry! But yeah, Butchers Crossing is great. Did you also get a McCarthy's Border Trilogy vibe from it?
  15. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    I think Berretini has a better shot, personally. Alongside Tsitsipas (ahem) he was my main pick as a challenger.
  16. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    Yeah, in such circumstances QF is a great result for just about anyone but Federer. But just bring competitive isn't enough at this stage. He'll only play if he thinks he can win big tournaments, and realistically Wimbledon is by far the best shot he has. Next year he'll be close to 41! I think he'd have had a chance this year with this draw if he'd just had a couple more months of matches behind him.
  17. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    Oh dear, sad to see Federer crushed like that. As brilliantly as Hurkacz played, that was horrible from Fed.
  18. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    He's a really exciting player - I could watch his backhand all day. Clearly Djokovic is a massive favourite, but Shapovalov has the kind of game to beat anyone - you don't take Rafa to the wire on a clay court without the ability to hit huge shots with relentless consistency. An interesting semi!
  19. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    Heh, I fancied Fucsovic to give Djokovic a real match today. He's getting munched so far.
  20. 39. Just Ignore Him by Alan Davies. Really impressive book about Davies' life and abuse at the hands of his father. 40. The Fellowship of the Ring, 41. The Two Towers, 42. The Return of the King by JRR Tolkien. I read Tolkien pretty much on a continual loop through my teens, but haven't since, and decided to revisit. Have to say, I still absolutely loved them, though perhaps in different ways. This time I really enjoyed the opening section in the Shire especially, as it strongly brought home feelings of growing up in rural England in simpler, happier times. I also still loved all the dialogue, most of which I remembered word for word. I listened on Audible, and had feared the narrator might be dated, but actually thought he was perfect. 43. American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins. I'd seen this highly recommended, but after a powerful opening I wasn't particularly impressed by it. I felt the key topics (drugs cartels and the horrific experiences of migrants from South America) are much better explored in works of non-fiction such as Chasing the Scream and Tell Me How it Ends. Previously:
  21. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    No, I don't think that's brutal so much as an unrealistic level of expectation for such a young player in an incredibly tough era. And of course people were famously saying similar of Federer until he won one at 21. He might have slams in him, or he might be another Dimitrov, but I think it's way too early to say which with anything other than a wild guess.
  22. Miner Willy

    Tennis

    Shapovalov is only 22! Plenty of time to develop the mental side and win tournaments.
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