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mash

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  1. Just completed HoD. I preferred AoS. It's a great game, but the last fight was a bit of a letdown. And I liked the AoS map better. Onto the CoTM.
  2. Nothing wrong with the Dukes of Hazzard. An American South where there are only white people, good old boys driving around in a 7 litre death trap with the Confederate flag painted on the top and a foxy chick who only ever seems to wear hot pants. Fabulous stuff
  3. Enjoyed this for the most part. Film reminded me of the Kill Bill films in the way those films put visual and audio cues from other films and weaved them in. Rather like a DJ mixing a track Films that I recognised were Amazing Mr Blunden, Repulsion, Suspiria, The Sentinel and However, the final 3rd annoyed me somewhat. Still a good film though. 4/5
  4. I haven't seen most of the Marvel films, in fact only one I have seen is the one is the 2nd part of the cliffhanger one, where the dead heroes magically come back to life. (I had to take the kids to that one) Aside from Nolan's Batman trilogy none of the recent DC films either.
  5. I'm doing these in completely the wrong order I'm guessing. Just completed Aria of Sorrow which was absolutely superb and I've moved onto Harmony of Dissonance. So far, so good. Not going to bother with Vampire's Kiss but I will give CoTM a bash. Best to worst
  6. Resisted the temptation to watch the version on the high seas and watched this in a cinema. Although not the IMAX version. I'm a huge fan of David Lynch's version, yes it's flawed but it's somewhat of a guilty pleasure for me. After seeing the new one there were elements I preferred in the new one and things I preferred in the old one. Cast - Tie. In the new one the actors are a lot more restrained than the wildly overblown acting in Lynch's version. I preferred Kenneth McMillan's pus filled, maniacal baron in Dune 84 over Stellan Skarsgaard's interpretation and of course Patrick Stewart was a better Gurney than Josh Brolin. But I always felt McLachlan was a bit too old for Paul Atreides and you've got Bautista as the Beast and Momoa as Duncan Idaho to balance it out. Production Design - Dune 2021 - New one wins this hands down. Lynch's version had some fantastic sets and it looked great but the new one feels 'real'. Everything looks great and you get a sense of being in the desert not in a fanciful set somewhere in a studio. Special Effects - Dune 2021 -The 1984 version was always a bit ropey, even back then. The shield effects were particularly piss poor. New one by a country mile. Music - Dune 84 - Didn't think much of Hans Zimmer's score tbh. I've forgotten it already. Not a patch on the score by Toto and Brian Eno. Both of the films omit stuff, the new one doesn't really tell you about Mentats, how the spice extends life and has evolved the navigators but you do get to know more about the Fremen in the new one. Jamis who comes across as a petulant div in Lynch's in the 3hour studio cut of Dune 84 is better represented in the new one. The biggest problem with Dune 84 was the final act. The bits up to where Paul joins the Fremen were great, it's the horrible final act which was completely rushed leading to rumours of there being a mythical cut which would reinstate this footage. Can't really compare them until Dune 2021 is finished. If it were to follow the same steps as the old one, part 2 would last 20 minutes. At the moment Dune 2021 is in the lead for me but it is an incomplete film. Need to see part 2 when it eventually comes out.
  7. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp - I first saw this about 20 odd years ago, when I was in my 20s. I enjoyed it but I don't think I really understood what it was about. To me it was a technicolour romp through the life and loves of an old soldier. Watching it now, when I'm in middle age I can see it's primarily about growing old. Something completely alien to me back then. Does anybody ever thing they're going to get old when they're 20? It's a completely brilliant film of course. Very daring for the time, how many films made in the UK during World War 2 would have one of the main characters be a sympathetic German? 5/5 Bride of Frankenstein - The iconic images from this film are stuff of legend. When we think of Frankenstein's monster, we think of the Boris Karloff in Frankenstein and this film. Watching it now, it does seem somewhat dated. The acting feels very theatrical. Which is understandable I suppose for a 86 year old film. It is however absolutely hilarious, the plot follows directly after the 1st film. It turns out the monster and the Dr both survived. Just when Dr Frankenstein thinks he can retire; Dr Frankenstein's old mentor Dr Pretorious looks him up and coerces him into creating the 'bride' of the title. A mate for the monster. The actor who plays Pretorious makes Quentin Crisp look like The Rock and is by far and a way the best thing in it. Back then audiences would not have been exposed to camp characters. And it's fun to let the actor let rip. Think Terence Stamp in Priscilla only more bitchy. 4/5 The Exorcist - The 70s were undoubtedly the high point of American cinema, a time when studios made crowd pleasing films which were also artistically valued. Coppola had an unbelievable run of directing a sequence of films which were just absolute masterpieces (Godfather, Godfather 2, The Conversation. Apocalypse Now) and I'd put him 1st as having the greatest run of films but William Friedkin would be second. From the French Connection to The Exorcist to Sorcerer. Each of those a genuine masterpiece and all completely different from each other. The Exorcist is probably the greatest horror film ever made. Watching it now, it still has the power to shock those jaded by the schlocky horror films released nowadays which equate horror to gore. Man I would have loved to have experienced this in the 70s. 5/5
  8. Let me guess.. Jimmy quit? Jody got married? Should have known we'd never get far.
  9. Did you have a time machine? Pretty sure it was released in early 2000 internationally. In the UK I remember it came out in mid 2000
  10. Been playing this and I can report it's ace. Plays right to the CPC's strengths. No scrolling! Colourful graphics. Some of the rules have been changed (don't get awarded for clearing boards quickly) and there are some niggles but considering the hardware it's on. Also love the fact they added backgrounds and tunes from other Taito games. Nice little easter egg for those of us who grew up with these games. It amazes me that hobbyists in 2021 are developing games for a system which I abandoned 30 years ago. As I'm getting older though, I find I'm revisiting the past. I'm finding games like this far more exciting to me that the latest Call of Duty. There's a buzz in seeing an old computer running a game which pushes its known 'limits'.
  11. Halloween Kills - Was Michael Myers sent from the future to kill the John Connor's mother? This was more of a Terminator film than the last Terminator film. Was it supposed to be scary? Only emotion it elicited from me was anger. Most protagonists in slasher films are stupid, it goes without saying that instead of running they will go looking for the killer and invariably get themselves killed. But the people in this film took it to another level. 2/5
  12. Just a quick one, I've been playing the Saturn version of SOTN. There's an excellent English translation out there. Anyhow, how do I press that switch in the bottom left hand corner?
  13. Used to love it on the arcade. It was quite novel at the time with its 2 player co-op and weapon pickups. Renegade was it's precursor but DD expanded on it in so many ways Outside of the arcade I played the non Richard Aplin CPC version which was slow but looked the part and then played the Megadrive version which was also slow. Huge disappointment that one. There are also some excellent OpenBor versions I played in the Dreamcast which are arguably better than the original.
  14. Saw this yesterday, thought it was great. Didn't notice the runtime at all. My favourite of the Craig era. A celebration of all the best bits of Bond through the years can't be bad can it? Criticisms? Rami Malek's villain was a tad underwhelming.
  15. Both the 70s adaptations of Chandler's The Big Sleep and Farewell my Lovely are available on Youtube. Mitchum was a fantastic Marlowe, a bit older than he was in the books but he captured the tone fantastically. I'd put him just behind Bogart. As for the films, Farewell my Lovely isn't too bad. Although it does take out a lot from the novel. It's only about 90 mins. The Big Sleep is more faithful, despite the fact it has been relocated to the UK in the 70s. The material (pornography, drugs, homosexuality, nymphomania) which the 40s film hinted at is fully there in 70s version. But it doesn't quite work, because the books 40s sensibilities are carried over. Why should anybody give a shit about buying porn or being photographed naked? What was taboo in the 40s was pretty tame 30 years later. There's another 70s version of a Chandler novel, The Long Goodbye. With Elliot Gould as Marlowe. First time I saw this version I hated it. It's nothing like the book. It takes the conceit of what if Chandler's 40s Marlowe was stuck in 70s LA. Marlowe with his code of honour is completely out of his depth in the deeply cynical 70s. it's definitely the best film of the three but the least faithful..
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