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The Shining Has Just Started On Bbc1


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I basically agree with the gist of this (mild spoilers if you haven't seen the film, by the way):

The film is about how the all-male British military establishment, itself forged in bloody empire-building, passed on to its off-spring continental empire, the United States, certain timeworn army-building methods, including separating weak males from the balancing influence of their more sensitive womenfolk and children. The Shining is also about America's current racism, particularly against blacks. Stuart Ullman tells the caretaker's wife Wendy in the only lines in the film in which the Indians are mentioned. Ullman says, "The site is supposed to be located on an Indian burial ground, and I believe they actually had to repel a few Indian attacks as they were building it." This bit of dialogue does not appear in Stephen King's novel The Shining. The first and most frequently seen of the film's very real American "ghosts" is the flooding river of blood that wells out of the elevator shaft, which presumably sinks into the Indian burial ground itself. The blood squeezes out in spite of the fact that the red doors are kept firmly shut within their surrounding Indian artwork embellished frames. We never hear the rushing blood. It is a mute nightmare. It is the blood upon which this nation, like most nations, was built, as was the Overlook Hotel.
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It's a true masterpiece.

I agree. It's not just a classic of the horror genre but a real work of art. I was thinking the other day that "Silent Hill" is basically the lamest horror movie never made, yet it's still an utterly terrifying experience. Imagine playing "The Shining". I'd fucking die!

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Guest jabberwock1977
I basically agree with the gist of this (mild spoilers if you haven't seen the film, by the way):
The film is about how the all-male British military establishment, itself forged in bloody empire-building, passed on to its off-spring continental empire, the United States, certain timeworn army-building methods, including separating weak males from the balancing influence of their more sensitive womenfolk and children. The Shining is also about America's current racism, particularly against blacks. Stuart Ullman tells the caretaker's wife Wendy in the only lines in the film in which the Indians are mentioned. Ullman says, "The site is supposed to be located on an Indian burial ground, and I believe they actually had to repel a few Indian attacks as they were building it." This bit of dialogue does not appear in Stephen King's novel The Shining. The first and most frequently seen of the film's very real American "ghosts" is the flooding river of blood that wells out of the elevator shaft, which presumably sinks into the Indian burial ground itself. The blood squeezes out in spite of the fact that the red doors are kept firmly shut within their surrounding Indian artwork embellished frames. We never hear the rushing blood. It is a mute nightmare. It is the blood upon which this nation, like most nations, was built, as was the Overlook Hotel.

:D

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Guest jabberwock1977
What did you think, jabberwock? That Kubrick just settled for a straight horror flick?

Nah... man.. it's obviously more than that. I'd just never read that subtext theory before, though have read others. Just funny that there all these different approaches. I should watch it again with that one in mind.

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Nah... man.. it's obviously more than that. I'd just never read that subtext theory before, though have read others. Just funny that there all these different approaches. I should watch it again with that one in mind.

When he goes to the bar and gets himself a bourbon...

'White man's burden'.

Anyway, what I quoted off that website is my favourite reading of the film. I think there's also an element of Kubrick making the standard horror film trope of 'this house is built on an Indian burial ground' his own.

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Guest jabberwock1977
When he goes to the bar and gets himself a bourbon...

'White man's burden'.

Anyway, what I quoted off that website is my favourite reading of the film. I think there's also an element of Kubrick making the standard horror film trope of 'this house is built on an Indian burial ground' his own.

Didn't notice that, interesting... and to be honest i haven't watched this film since i was about 15 so i'm sure if i gave it a fresh glance i'd get greater insight as i have with more recent viewings of Barry Lyndon, Clockwork Orange (diff from A Burgess!), Full Metal & Strangelove. Your deconstruction of the shining seemed pretty "out there" and i really thought it was a joke to start with (sorry!) but will apply to next viewing.

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Your deconstruction of the shining seemed pretty "out there" and i really thought it was a joke to start with (sorry!) but will apply to next viewing.

Nae bother, pal. Not my deconstruction, though - I quoted it off the website Vemsie linked to.

I do more or less agree with it, though.

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This is an utter masterpiece and probably my favorite horror film.

If King's book is anything like his mini-series then he can shove it.

Is it true that the only time Kubrick spoke to King about the film, he rang King up one night and simply asked "Do you believe in God?"

King paused, then replied, "yes".

To which Kubrick put the phone down on him and never consulted him again.

That's probably bullshit, but it was something I recall being told many years ago.

:D

It wouldn't surprise me though.

And yes, the book is more like the mini-series.

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The book was scary, especially the bit at the end where all hell is breaking loose and they're trying to escape, but the movie is probably the better version - Kubrik is without a doubt a genius and Nicholson's performance is amazing.

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