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Where The Wild Things Are


11 Herbs 'n' Spices
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I thought this was insanely beautiful. As someone else pointed out, it captures the confusion and loneliness of childhood perfectly. The Wild Things are probably the most impressive cinematic achievement I can recall seeing in a long time and I thought they were completely believable. Carol in particular is just incredibly well conceived, so much character and never once do you feel like you're watching a puppet.

Varnsen you work at Framestore right? Were you guys responsible for modeling the faces of the Wild Things?

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I thought this was insanely beautiful. As someone else pointed out, it captures the confusion and loneliness of childhood perfectly. The Wild Things are probably the most impressive cinematic achievement I can recall seeing in a long time and I thought they were completely believable. Carol in particular is just incredibly well conceived, so much character and never once do you feel like you're watching a puppet.

Varnsen you work at Framestore right? Were you guys responsible for modeling the faces of the Wild Things?

Yeah and check this out;

http://uk.rottentomatoes.com/m/where_the_w...wild_things_are

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Just back from seeing it.

I thought it was absolutely brilliant. So much charm and beauty. It just felt like it hit home everything about being a kid growing up. To hard for me to describe in any adequate detail.

Here's a question though. Did anyone who went with a female find that she didn't like it? Happened in my case. She said boys are weird after my friend and me said the same things about why we liked it. :lol:

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Here's a question though. Did anyone who went with a female find that she didn't like it? Happened in my case. She said boys are weird after my friend and me said the same things about why we liked it. :lol:

Second time I went was with a female friend, and she loved it! Tears were shed. Although I cried too the first time I saw it.

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I went with my girlfriend and she loved it, cried too. I was nearly in tears at the end as well, very moving stuff. I think Spike himself said it wasn't a childrens film, but a film about childhood, which sums it up perfectly I think.

I seem to become a blubbering mess more and more often at the cinema these days. Up, while fantastic, was tinged with an undercurrent of sadness running throughout the whole film I thought. Even that scene from The Invention of Lying in the hospital had me welling up.

Think I need to man-up.

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I sat down in the theatre and had a horrifying thought: what if, after six years of waiting, I hated the film? It was the first time I'd really contemplated the idea that this might not actually be any good. Thankfully, I'm pleased to say, the film did live up to my incredibly high expectations. It was beautiful, bittersweet, charming and magical. It is not a film for children but I don't have a problem with that. I love the fact Jonze has taken a much loved book and ditched everything but the basics of the story. By removing pivotal scenes such as

the forest growing in Max's bedroom

he has totally distanced himself from the source material whilst still being true to the spirit of Sendak's work. Interestingly, if they had kept the aforementioned scene it would have removed the ever present sense of danger that worked so well in the film.

In many ways this reminded me of The Company of Wolves or Valerie and Her Week of Wonders in that they deal with the onset of adolescence by subverting aspects of our childhood. It probably shares more in common with Valerie... because both are essentially mood pieces rather than having strong coherent narratives to hold them together. I can see why this film won't be liked by many but if you buy into the world that is created it is a truly wonderful experience.

Warner Brothers must take some credit in letting Jonze complete his vision. Considering the IP and money involved you could hardly begrudge the studio for going in a safer direction than they did. But I am incredibly pleased they did back Jonze because these sort of films are incredibly rare.

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I'm glad you enjoyed the film cookie! You went through quite an ordeal it seems to just get to see it.

I hope now that the film will make some decent money in the worldwide market as I'd like for it not to be considered a flop financially. Basically, get a good nights rest lordcookie, a glass of milk before bed and then get back down the cinema tomorrow night. thanks.

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Basically, get a good nights rest lordcookie, a glass of milk before bed and then get back down the cinema tomorrow night. thanks.

I would love to go and see it again at the cinema if I could. You are right that it is sad if this is a flop because it will mean we won't see anything as bold and as brave for a very long time. With this, Fantastic Mr Fox and Speed Racer being relative bombs at the box office I think we'll just see safe adaptations of childhood favourites. It is a shame but at least we had a year and a half of quirky and brilliantly realised films to look back on.

Regarding the film again - I loved Terry and Bob. They managed to take a stupid throwaway joke and build them into this really wonderful scene full of jealousy and frustration that any child feels when friends make friends with somebody else. In fact there were lots of seemingly throwaway moments that built into these more pivotal encounters. Normally films scream at you that you are about to experience a crucial part of the plot but here they sneak up on you. Lovely.

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Saw this on Saturday, the first chance I had to get to the cinema and it was AWESOME I could barely stand it. I loved it: we sat there hitting each other at all the genius little touches, or bittersweet facial expressions, or content moments

furry monsters in a pile, anyone?

.

It was great and as someone pointed out upthread, everyone should go and see it. Where I live doesn't have the greatest cinema following (I was surprised my local was showing it at all) but I went to see it on Saturday night and apart from us, there were four other people in the screening. Which is depressing...

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It was great and as someone pointed out upthread, everyone should go and see it. Where I live doesn't have the greatest cinema following (I was surprised my local was showing it at all) but I went to see it on Saturday night and apart from us, there were four other people in the screening. Which is depressing...

I absolutely loved every second of it. The soundtrack was lovely and it seemed as if each scene had more care poured into it than most movies. I saw it at the Cornerhouse in Manchester and there were probably 8 people in the cinema not including our group of 8.

(For those of you bad at maths that is 16 people).

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It's a film that definitely demands to be seen on the big screen first time around. If nothing else the sheer beauty of the cinematography needs a big screen to be fully appreciated.

Absolutely. In the scene where it starts snowing right after

they find out that Max doesn't have any powers

, there's a shot of Max that gave me chills, honestly. Just stunning.

Pretty small crowds at the two screenings I was at, too. Probably 20 at both, and they were on the opening two days. Although the times were 4.15pm and 2pm, and I've never seen a big crowd at those times.

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It's a film that definitely demands to be seen on the big screen first time around. If nothing else the sheer beauty of the cinematography needs a big screen to be fully appreciated.

In fact the lighting during the first encounter with the Wild Things is jaw dropping.

This is one of my favourite sequences. Has one of the best lines too -

something like "I like your work - it has a spontaneity that can't be taught!"

Love Carol.

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Absolutely. In the scene where it starts snowing right after

they find out that Max doesn't have any powers

, there's a shot of Max that gave me chills, honestly. Just stunning.

That sequence was beautiful. Normally I groan at the way films use the weather to convey emotional states but because the world is entirely in Max's head it worked perfectly here.

This is one of my favourite sequences. Has one of the best lines too -

something like "I like your work - it has a spontaneity that can't be taught!"

Love Carol.

It is quite an introduction to the characters. The use of firelight makes them seem all fuzzy and inviting yet it can turn on a six pence as the shadows creep in and the Wild Things begin to appear incredibly frightening for a young child. The whole sequence kind of took me back to my childhood and going to those large bonfire night displays. You'd be wrapped up all warm standing next to the roaring pyre and then out of nowhere you'd get these loud cracks from fireworks. You were never sure if you were in a safe environment or not.

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Got hold of a good copy, got to the bit where he sets off and stopped it. I neeeeeed to see this at the cinema! I'd go with my niece (10 years) but she thinks it looks rubbish, she wants to see Planet51 instead :facepalm:

Anyone seen this with kids? What was their reaction to it?

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