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The Ultimate Lasagna


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  • 2 weeks later...

So the missus is having a few of her friends round for dinner - I've been ordered to make one of my wonderful lasagne meals. Wouldn't be so bad but as I'm clearing out of the house I probably won't get a taste of it :(

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 years later...

I am trying this tonight for the first time - it's basically the same as the recipe I've always used which is apparently a traditional Italian one, from Gino Dicampo's Italian cookbook.

The method for making the bechamel is slightly different, I will try this one. How much does it make? The reason I'm making it is I've finally got a decent sized lasagne dish (Asda, £6) and so can make a decent-sized one for the first time (my old dish only let me make enough for 4 decent sized portions, this one should manage by the looks of it).

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Just checking something before I start (so would appreciate a quick answer from anyone who's around!)

No oil in the pan before you cook the meat (the recipe seems to suggest?) - sounds good to me. But is that definitely right (I'm sure it is as mince will obviously cook in its own fat but most other recipes I've seen seem to put oil into the pan before browning the mince).

Do you discard the cooking juices after you've browned the mince, and before you add the veggies? Or let the veggies stew in the cooking juices? If this is the case I'm not sure why you add olive oil here.

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Personally I brown the meat in batches first when I do ragu, then do the soffrito veg before putting the meat back in and adding milk/wine/tomatoes/stock etc. Stops the mince going grey and sad and means you don't end up with an oil slick on top from too much fat.

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Personally I brown the meat in batches first when I do ragu, then do the soffrito veg before putting the meat back in and adding milk/wine/tomatoes/stock etc. Stops the mince going grey and sad and means you don't end up with an oil slick on top from too much fat.

I did it in batches too, as the recipe in the OP suggests.

Basically after you cook the mince, and remove it from the pan, you're left with meat juices. I've tried leaving them in while I cook the vegetables, which does seem like it should in theory add more flavour. But it does end up being more fatty - its particularly apparent if you take some of the ragu and freeze it for later use, as I always do - there's orangey fatty layer which rises to the top.

What I did this time, when cooking it in batches - was to make sure as much of the juice as possible was sealed into the meat before I removed it from the pan. It's obviously much easier to do this when you're just browning small batches, as each batch only produces a small amount of juice.

Now this doesn't seem like it should make much difference. But I did notice that when I froze and defrosted the ragu, it didn't have the orange layer of fat. It still tasted as good though. Obviously it still had the same amount of fat (almost), as I put the fat back into the pan when I put the meat back.

Just wondered whether other people came across this situation before.

Lasagne was amazing by the way, wish I'd taken some pictures. Everyone who ate it said it was the best they'd had, and I hadn't made a big deal about it being "ultimate" or anything.

Going to try it with liver next time - it's not in the official ultimate recipe but I've seen it in lots of ragu recipies before and always meant to try it. I can imagine it being next level shit.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

Wouldn't it make sense to edit this post so the fact that the recipe only tells you to make half as much bechamel as you actually need is somewhere other than right at the bottom? Where you definitely won't see it until too late if you're working through the recipe from start to end?

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  • 1 year later...
  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/07/2015 at 11:32, Mentazm said:

Yeah, I've found it tastes better and certainly status together better if you put in the fridge after cooking then heat it up for 4m30s in micro.

 

I make it the day before, and leave it in the fridge overnight.  Food always tastes better the next day, and it cuts perfectly.

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  • 3 months later...

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