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Heavy Rain (PS3)


Agent_Supercool
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while my impressions for the demo are that I still want to play this - he's got a point about the movement controls. I was all over the place with them.

Movement controls are fine. There is no other way to move and keep the same sense of camera direction. The R2 for movement and R1 for change of camera angles work fine most of the time.

It would probably be better with traditional controls but then some of the direction would be lost. Besides, this is not an action game, you don't have to move fast, jump or hang of a ledge. Controls are fine.

Any review judging this game with traditional methods -"oh look! the camera is not on the right stick!" is a failure.

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It may just be Teletext and I've no idea who the guy is but I have always found the reviews on there to be pretty level headed.

Aside from just slating GC how about some comments on the issues it raises?

scottcr mentiones the control issue, what about

"the total lack of complex interactivity"
"Instead you're dragged through each scene by the nose, forced to pantomime onscreen actions as if you're controlling a virtual marionette. The highlights of the game are the various chase and fight scenes but these normally drag on for far too long and none have the pace or urgency of gold standard QTE sequences such as the knife fight in Resident Evil 4. Worse, despite the game pretending otherwise it's actually impossible to die in most of them. This makes your participation in proceedings seem even more pointless."
"The next issue is simply that the script isn't good enough. If it were live action it would seem absurdly illogical and cliched, but performed by the game's mediocre voice-actors and mannequin-like characters it become downright laughable."
"Perhaps the most egregious flaw is how the game actively distances you from the characters and their choices. Scenes are often made more confusing because you don't know something the character clearly does and the twist ending hinges entirely on the fact that you don't really know anything about them and are never in full control. You aren't playing the game, the game is playing you."

Im not sayiing any of this is right or wrong, I haven't played it, but would be interested in some views from those that have.

Im still going to pick it up eventually, probably once its down to the £20 make, whatever its faults I think its a pretty interesting piece of work.

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"Perhaps the most egregious flaw is how the game actively distances you from the characters and their choices. Scenes are often made more confusing because you don't know something the character clearly does and the twist ending hinges entirely on the fact that you don't really know anything about them and are never in full control.

This part of the GC review sounds particularly damning. I think that would fuck me off no end, to be honest.

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Movement controls are fine. There is no other way to move and keep the same sense of camera direction. The R2 for movement and R1 for change of camera angles work fine most of the time.

It would probably be better with traditional controls but then some of the direction would be lost. Besides, this is not an action game, you don't have to move fast, jump or hang of a ledge. Controls are fine.

Any review judging this game with traditional methods -"oh look! the camera is not on the right stick!" is a failure.

TSH - you won't take a single criticism of this game... the controls for moving around *aren't* fine. It doesn't stop me wanting the game as it doesn't strike me as a game where movement is critical - but there were a large number of occasions in the demo, particularly when I was the future-specs FBI guy wandering around, where it was almost comical how clumsy I looked.

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Been seeing adds for this on the telly and thinking how crummy the graphics look, conversely the mrs thought they looked amazing almost like a movie.

Its strange how games obsessed with realism still do such an awful job of conveying that into their characters- the characters in the adds seem to have black holes inside them If I met someone like that in real life I'd be fearful of them opening their mouth in case the entire planet got sucked inside.

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I got emailed this earlier; apparently it’s transcribed from David Cage’s original plot outline for the opening of Heavy Rain. I gather the story changed quite a bit in the development process, but there still may be a few spoilers in there, so beware!

Joe decided to tell Daphne that he was going back to Ireland because it was plausible. The box still sat on the seat beside him and he patted it with his hand and gulped. The van, white in the low rusty autumn sunlight crept slowly through the brown leaves on the road in Daphne’s street and slowly came to a halt. At the door, Joe breathed out and wished that he had taken a pill or two or three to calm his shaking hands. He pressed his thumb sternly on the bell and waited. It resounded in the large rooms of the large house. It seemed like an hour yet Daphne did not come to answer. Daphne’s shape wasn’t visible through the frosted glass of the door. He stood for thirty seconds and pressed again. For no reason, he pressed his thumb harder and the same sound reverberated around the same large rooms. The house seemed silent of life. This had never happened before.

As Joe sat in the traffic, waiting for the lights to change and for the people to cross and thinking of the zealots back at home, Daphne Celeste was stepping out of the shower feeling dazed with the thought of the jewellery box. With one leg in the shower and one leg on the cork floor, she extended a middle aged arm out towards the towel rack. The arm was short and she stretched, the muscle extended, expanding the little dimples that looked like Satsuma peel on the inside of her sagging bicep. She caught the corner of a towel, her hair was still wet and a droplet of shampoo that she had missed stung her eyes shut. That’s how she died. Her right leg gave way, skidding on the lip of the shower and up the side of the glass screen. Simultaneously, her body twisted in mid air, her hands grasping for a floor, a wall, something that wasn’t there. As Joe ushered an old man to pull out from a junction with his headlights, Daphne Celeste’s head struck a solid aluminium cabinet that sat in the corner of the room. She died almost instantly, in the time it takes to bite through the flesh of an apple her vision flickered and she had died. The noise was sickening but no one was there to hear. Surprisingly, there wasn’t much blood. She received a blow the equivalent of being shot by a 2.2 hunting rifle at two hundred and fifty metres. Her skull was broken and fractured beyond repair. Shards of bone had torn into her brain. The x-rays that confirmed the cause of death to be accidental looked like a firework display to the Pathologist.

Joe stood for three more minutes before feeling puzzled and he walked back to the van. He completed a little card that said “we called, you were out”, it had a cartoon version of him in the top left hand corner; a man in dungarees holding out an upturned thumb with a wink in his eye. He ticked the boxes that said he’d return tomorrow and scribbled his signature. It was the first time he had ever written anything to Daphne. He opened the letterbox and peered inside. He could see and empty corridor and an empty kitchen beyond the corridor but there was no Daphne. He left the card and, after trying the doorbell one more time, he drove back to work and clocked out. This had never happened before. It was 3:00pm.

At home, Joe lived above a shop that sold shoes, he wrote a letter. It was short and rather abrupt but it was to Daphne and it was to say goodbye.

Dear Daphne, (He almost wrote Celeste but hesitating he wrote “I”)

I hope this letter finds you well. I’m sorry first of all for writing at all but I called around today with your delivery and you were not there. (His handwriting was untidy and he rewrote this several times, added words, took words out and rephrased. His words would never stay on the lines, they always floated like an undulating wave between them. A teacher at school had made him feel inferior in front of the whole class because of this. She made floating movements with her hands and said “Joseph, we can’t fly can we?” and she also suggested that Joe was actually left handed. It was the only explanation for such terrible writing.) I wanted to tell you something important that I’ve decided that I should do. I think you should know. I won’t be delivering any more parcels to you any more. I’m going back to Ireland to work with my Dad at the family farm. (the thought filled his stomach with fear and a great pit of loathing opened up in his head. He’d once seen his father hit a cow on the head with a twelve pound lump hammer. In one blow, practiced and precise, it struck the animal perfectly and Joe caught a glimpse of pride in his father’s eye as the cow collapsed in a heap of hooves and skin. Joe was never ill after that. ) My father has been asking me for a long time and I agreed last week.

I’m sorry. (he started a new paragraph and let the words “I’m sorry” hang there for ten minutes as he made a cup of coffee, looked out of the window as the local shops were closing their shutters for the night.) I know you said you loved me but I don’t think you do and I have to go. You aren’t the reason for my leaving, it’s just that my Dad is getting old and he can’t do the things he used to do and he needs me.

Thank you for the presents and for being so nice to me. I hope you aren’t too upset.

All the best.

Joseph K Singe

X

He regretted the little “x” but sat down and reread his words and was satisfied he had written enough to explain.

At nine thirty he took his medication and a little extra, placed a glass of water by his bed and slept until the alarm woke him at five O’clock. On his way to the depot he bought a stamp from a vending machine and posted the letter, hoping that she’d understand; even if it was a lie.

Daphne was discovered at nine. A few minutes afterwards to be exact and was taken away by an ambulance. Martin was frantic. The sight of blood and the sight of Daphne, contorted and cold and blue and dead. For hours he sat on the stairs with every thought of regret he had ever had jumping out at him. He was visibly shaken and thought that God was punishing him for his sins even though he did not believe in God at all. He shed no tears but his eyes were red raw through trying. He dialled Marina’s number over and over, never seeming to manage the final number 7. He didn’t want to be alone in a house where someone had died. Suddenly, he managed, almost by accident to dial Marina’s number and she answered too quickly and Martin began to breathe heavily and sobbed “She’s gone, she’s gone, she’s gone” over and over. Marina was able to calm him down enough and told him to wait for her. When she arrived the door was still open and Martin was not calm. “What took you so long? What took you so long?” Martin was confused and in shock. Nothing like this had ever happened to him before.

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Those miserable bastards over at Gamecentral must be eager for hits now that the only way to read reviews is on their even-shittier-than-Teletext website, and not just something to do with the telly while you're drinking your morning cuppa.

Agreed. Take redundancy like a man, Jenkins.

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I got emailed this earlier; apparently it’s transcribed from David Cage’s original plot outline for the opening of Heavy Rain. I gather the story changed quite a bit in the development process, but there still may be a few spoilers in there, so beware!

:)

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I'm up to chapter 28.

And the game has now stopped working.

Turned on the PS3, loaded the game and it offers me the chance to continue from the last save point, 'Sexy Girl'.

I try to load it but the screen goes black and nothing happens.

Same when I try to load any other chapter.

It's fucked. Shame, I was really enjoying it :omg:

Did you install the patch?

http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-12218-V...severe-problems

Prior to launch, Heavy Rain received a 230MB patch and what exactly it did was unknown and currently remains unknown. With the game now on retail shelves, many are going to their local retailers and picking the game up in eager anticipation to bring it home and immerse themselves in a unique gaming experience. Sadly, after installing the 230MB patch, they are running into some technical issues with the game.

Among the complaints, many are complaining about game crashes, audio skipping, save/loading problems, and some characters getting caught in furniture. Not all are complaining about the game, though. For many, the game is running fine after the patch and they are enjoying the experience the game offers. Whether the problems are widespread or just a minor problem for some can't be determined, yet. Since the game isn't an online title, you don't need to get the patch to play the game, but you will have to deny the patch every time you play the game.

If you are having any of the problems mentioned above, let us know in the comments. When we reviewed the game, none of these problems were present and it seems that the patch could be the cause of the problems. Hopefully, we'll hear something about these issues from Sony and a solution in the near future.

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Hm. Just played the first hour of the game. First: there's a lot of grain that wasn't in the demo :S.

The acting is well... ehm.. a little 'off'? It all seems a little fake, corny and funny when it shouldn't be funny.

I think the acting, voice-overs etc of Uncharted 2 spoiled us..

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It's simultaneously engrossing and terrible. The minutiae is almost unbearably tedious (I very nearly just quit out early on), but something compels me to keep playing. I say playing but that's not really what's happening here. I pretty much completely agree with the review posted above, except for the fact that I am finding it kind of interesting story-wise.

I guess what it comes down to is that I want to see how the story unfolds, and if I have to push a few buttons here and there to keep it moving along so be it.

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TSH - you won't take a single criticism of this game... the controls for moving around *aren't* fine. It doesn't stop me wanting the game as it doesn't strike me as a game where movement is critical - but there were a large number of occasions in the demo, particularly when I was the future-specs FBI guy wandering around, where it was almost comical how clumsy I looked.

Heavy Rain has flaws, mainly scripting flaws. Graphics are not always great and voice overs not always super.

I had no problem whatsoever with the controls. They are strange, sure, but worked fine for me and didn't create a problem. What do you want me to say?

Also, the telextet review says that the "the biggest highlights of the game are the chase scenes and fights". That is complete shit and shows that the reviewer really has no clue for me.

The highlights of this game are the choices.

I have no problem with criticism, unless it is completely clueless. :omg:

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The highlights of this game are the choices.

So would you disagree with this part of the GC review I highlighted earlier?

Perhaps the most egregious flaw is how the game actively distances you from the characters and their choices. Scenes are often made more confusing because you don't know something the character clearly does and the twist ending hinges entirely on the fact that you don't really know anything about them and are never in full control.

I haven't played the game but I'm curious about this.

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It's simultaneously engrossing and terrible. The minutiae is almost unbearably tedious (I very nearly just quit out early on), but something compels me to keep playing. I say playing but that's not really what's happening here. I pretty much completely agree with the review posted above, except for the fact that I am finding it kind of interesting story-wise.

I guess what it comes down to is that I want to see how the story unfolds, and if I have to push a few buttons here and there to keep it moving along so be it.

when I first played the demo I couldn't believe that it was making a game out of using an asthma inhaler... then I tried again and got into the swing of it. I'm intrigued enough to trade in the overhyped yawnfest that is Fable 2 to put towards this.

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when I first played the demo I couldn't believe that it was making a game out of using an asthma inhaler... then I tried again and got into the swing of it. I'm intrigued enough to trade in the overhyped yawnfest that is Fable 2 to put towards this.

Great idea, it should get you about £4 off Heavy Rain

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Interesting that that Gamecentral criticism goes directly against what the game purportedly tries to do. But then I can see what the developers went for - why does failing a QTE mean death? Why do they have to be based around binary choices - you live, you die?

Just because you miss a few buttons in the fight in the demo doesn't mean the opponent's going to pull out a knife and slice your stomach open. It's just getting rid of the notion that there are only two possible outcomes to the situation: carrying on as normal or getting killed.

The only problem I could think of is that you can't easily equate the pressing of a button to the throwing of a fist or the counter of a thrown punch. They don't take advantage of the pressure sensitivity of the face buttons (probably too hard to depict in an icon) so tapping X to punch someone in the balls may as well be analogous to giving them a little poke. The only detachment I think could be evident is the implementation of a system that inadvertently highlights the shortcomings of attempting to mimic real life actions with button presses.

That's not Heavy Rain, though. That's any game. Control pads were redesigned to have analogue triggers for FPSs and racing games. How much further could you go?

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Interesting that that Gamecentral criticism goes directly against what the game purportedly tries to do. But then I can see what the developers went for - why does failing a QTE mean death? Why do they have to be based around binary choices - you live, you die?

Just because you miss a few buttons in the fight in the demo doesn't mean the opponent's going to pull out a knife and slice your stomach open. It's just getting rid of the notion that there are only two possible outcomes to the situation: carrying on as normal or getting killed.

So are there no consequences to missing the button presses in these scenes?

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So are there no consequences to missing the button presses in these scenes?

It generally seems to determine just how beat up your character gets, I've not tried to intentionally miss every prompt in a scene though. Apparently it's entirely possible to have major characters die in the course of the game by player actions rather than plot - but the story alters and goes on without them. If the game really is that open to various threads it's much more impressive than I thought.

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I got emailed this earlier; apparently it’s transcribed from David Cage’s original plot outline for the opening of Heavy Rain. I gather the story changed quite a bit in the development process, but there still may be a few spoilers in there, so beware!

:)

That's a classic of modern literature. I knew it'd be getting a reprint some day.

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