Jump to content

What are you reading at the moment?


ChrisN
 Share

Recommended Posts

Someone left The White Queen by Philippa Gregory and The Lovely Bones in my office so I read those in my lunchbreaks this week. They are tosh, but enjoyable tosh; I was pleasantly surprised by the latter. Many parts of the narrative seemed brave and interesting, given the genre of the novel - given that, I had high hopes for a perplexing ending, but was let down by a neat, moral tying-up of all the threads. Bah.

To atone, for reading tosh, I read A Suitable Boy for the umpteenth time. It's huge but I highly recommend it. I'll be reading AS Byatt's The Children's Book next. Read the first chapter last night and it's hooked me already.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a third of the way through Hard Times, It's the first time I've read it and as always when I return to Dickens I find myself wondering why I bother reading anybody else's work. Incredible wordplay, touching (as always, not overwrought) themes and the gradual weaving (no pun intended) of people and time around around a single place. Wonderful literature, simply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been reading the Jack Reacher books by Lee Child this last while and I'm just about to start the last one. Anything else out there that's similar that people recommend for em to read after I'm finished?

Robert Crais - he does a series featuring Elvis Cole, ex military now a PI. The first book is called "The Monkey's Raincoat" if you want to read them in order but I'd be tempted to start with "LA Requiem" - can't recommend it highly enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ive just ordered James Herbert's "Once"

Has been a while since I ready any novel and after reading some of his previous stuff such as Moon, The Spear and The Dark, I thought i'd try something else from him.

Managed to get the first print hardback for about £2 which is good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert Crais - he does a series featuring Elvis Cole, ex military now a PI. The first book is called "The Monkey's Raincoat" if you want to read them in order but I'd be tempted to start with "LA Requiem" - can't recommend it highly enough.

Thanks mate, I'll check him out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Over the weekend I read The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death by Charlie Huston. The story of a former school teacher turned crime scene cleaner who gets mixed up in some low level criminal goings on. This was pretty bad. The central character is a humourless dick who whinges his way through the first 100 pages or so. At that point we find out what made him such a tool but by then it’s too late and I didn’t care for him. The other characters are equally annoying and the crime thriller side of the book is not thrilling in the slightest. Avoid.

I’m also reading Do They Know I’m Running by David Corbett. This is the story of an El Salvadorian immigrent in LA who gets caught up in a scheme to travel down to El Salvador and bring his Uncle home to LA. Of course when he gets there things go wrong and plans change and he ends up on the run in Mexico with a beautiful girl.

This is fantastic so far. It’s similar to a George Pelecanos (one of the writers on The Wire) book in the way Pelecanos writes crime thrillers set in the Black and Greek community of Washington DC that give also work as social commentary – this does the same for Latino communities in LA. On the surface it’s a straight thriller but it also shows what life is like for illegal immigrants in LA. Highly recommended.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of starting a new thread, can anyone recommend me a few books to get my girlfriend for christmas? Recently she's enjoyed

Chbosky - The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Loe - Naive.Super

July - No one Belongs Here More Than You

Plath - The Bell Jar

Vonnegut - Timequake

Jim Dodge's Fup has caught my eye, but I'd like to get her one or two more

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm reading the latest Waste of Time book - Towers of Midnight.

Starting to get quite bored with the series now, and I suspect that this 'last three' books could have made a better read if they were condensed down a bit and made into one novel (there's still far too much incidental stuff going on that doesn't move the plot forward in any meaningful way), but it's a damned sight better than the stuff Robert Jordan was coming out with before he died. At least something has happened in this book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of starting a new thread, can anyone recommend me a few books to get my girlfriend for christmas? Recently she's enjoyed

Chbosky - The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Loe - Naive.Super

July - No one Belongs Here More Than You

Plath - The Bell Jar

Vonnegut - Timequake

Jim Dodge's Fup has caught my eye, but I'd like to get her one or two more

freedom by Jonathan franzen was excellent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Priviledges by Jonathan Dee was good too.

I've just read Truth by Peter Temple which is his second about an Aussie detective working in Melbourne. Some of the usual cliches, why is it policeman in books are almost as fucked up as the criminals? But this is superior crime writing, you get a real sense of place from it. Really enjoyed it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finished reading Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow, of Boing Boing and cape-and-goggles-in-xkcd fame. It depicts a society that's a bit like the Culture (post-scarcity, memory backups, etc) crossed with the world of Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash (an America split up into millions of tiny self-governing areas - although DAOITMK's version is a lot more optimistic).

In fact, midway through the book Hiro Protagonist is mentioned, which was a funny surprise, and made me - mistakenly - think for a moment that the book might be a Snow Crash sequel set a century or so later.

Now that combination might make it sound like the geekiest and therefore, of course, best novel ever. But it's not quite as good as it sounds. I've had no trouble suspending my disbelief for a lot of ridiculous sci-fi and fantasy ideas in my time, but I was never really convinced by the book's attempts to make preserving a Disney theme park ride seem like the most vitally significant issue in the world. Also, many people dislike Snow Crash because it comes across as a shameless attempt to tick every single box that will appeal to geeks. That didn't bother me with Snow Crash, but having read Doctorow's book, I get what they mean.

I read a paper copy, but the book's also available as a free download, if you have an iPad or Kindle or one of those other devices that makes it bearable to read a full novel on a computer screen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plodding through the incredibly boring Consider Phlebas by the overrated mister Banks.

Next up is Dune and then Dune Messiah. I've read Dune a few times and loved it. I've tried to get through Messiah twice and never managed it though. I always lose interest about five pages in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plodding through the incredibly boring Consider Phlebas by the overrated mister Banks.

Most people in the Banks thread agree that it's far from his best book - but I never found it boring. Even the book's most unnecessary diversion (the bit with the Eaters) kept my interest just by being disgusting...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could give "Tokyo Doesn't Love Us Anymore" by Ray Loriga a shot.

140.jpg

It's about a salesman who travels the world selling a drug that wipes part of the memory, usually for people who have had traumatic incidents. He may or may not be hooked on the drug himself- he has no way of being sure anymore. But be warned although it's a bit abstract and isn't what you'd call plot heavy- which for me got a wee bit frustrating at times. The Believer magazine summed it like this-

In Toyko Doesn’t Love Us Anymore, Ray Loriga, like Charlie Kaufman in Eternal Sunshine, riffs on these old conceits in order to salvage something humane, if disorienting and brutal. The plots and even the tone of these two works are quite similar. Both involve the idea of a memory-erasing business, although Kaufman takes the perspective of the patient, and Loriga that of the traveling salesman peddling oblivion in the near-futuristic purgatory of a global drug culture—hotels, swimming pools, cocaine nights, bi-curious sex, and traffic jams—stretching from Vegas to Vietnam. Loriga deals in the classic Burroughs-ian tropes of the Company and the Agent, who is dangerously addicted to the substance he is selling, apparently to suppress the details of a long-lost love affair.

Burroughs isn't a bad comparison- both authors are more interested in the moments and the more disorientating, surreal sides of existence than in pushing forward a high octane plot or story.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just finished Cold Mountain. It was very good, but I hate it when I just *know* a story is going to be tragic. It makes it really difficult for me to want to read it because I don't want to make the bad things happen :( (I haven't seen the film, it was just clearly not a 'happy ending' kind of book.) For the same reason, I can't bring myself to read The Good Earth again, even though I want to as I was just a teenager when I read it first time around.

And now I've got The Lovely Bones to read, and that's a film I HAVE seen so I just don't even want to start it :<

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And now I've got The Lovely Bones to read, and that's a film I HAVE seen so I just don't even want to start it :<

I haven't seen the film due to being thoroughly unimpressed by the trailer, but I ended up reading the novel a few weeks ago and it really wasn't that bad. From what I've heard of the film the novel is sufficiently different to make it worth reading if you've seen the film. Of course, if you're referring to the less-than-pleasant moments, then discard this!

I've just read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and was genuinely taken aback by it. One of the only modern novels I've ever read that chimes in so perfectly with my personal beliefs, and finding out that the title actually translates as Men Who Hate Women only increases my love for it. Can't wait for the weekend when I can get my hands on the second one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.