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What are you reading at the moment?


ChrisN
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Still reading Catch-22. I think I posted the same title in this topic just before Christmas, and I'm still reading it. It took me a while to get into it (so many characters), but now I love it.

Major Major Major Major is brilliant. And Milo's syndicate! :(

I'm about 100 pages from the end, and there are some genuinely sad bits happening now... Orr has crashed for the final time, McWatt has just committed suicide after slicing Kid Sampson in half, and Doc Daneeka's dead (though admittedly that hasn't stopped him wandering around).

:(

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Notch another one up for 'Those with Good Taste'.

Ooh, me too, reading it now. Evidently not Dumas himself, though, I quote, from chapter 36: "... a man who has been condemned for four or five months to suffer Italian cooking (which is amongst the worst in the world)."

Clearly mental. Still, a great book.

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I'm still reading 'war and peace' with is gettign to the good bit as Napolean is only a few miles from Moscow, about to attack the Russian army at the battle of borodino. Whislt Pierra (Tolstoys muse) lookson at the slaughter.

ALSO

I have the new Ian Banks book. "the steep approach to garbadale" which even though i promised to finish war and peace before hand, i started reading last night...... and so far .. it's ace.

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I'm still reading 'war and peace' with is gettign to the good bit as Napolean is only a few miles from Moscow, about to attack the Russian army at the battle of borodino. Whislt Pierra (Tolstoys muse) lookson at the slaughter.

Ahh now there's a good book. Anna Karenina is similarly excellent if you feel like more Tolstoy!

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Ooh, me too, reading it now. Evidently not Dumas himself, though, I quote, from chapter 36: "... a man who has been condemned for four or five months to suffer Italian cooking (which is amongst the worst in the world)."

Clearly mental. Still, a great book.

It's my favourite book ever, I think.

If you like The Three Musketeers (though it's not a patch on Monte Cristo IMO) then check out Captain Alatriste.

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I'm about to start reading Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke. I found an absolutely beautiful hardback version in a second hand bookshop here in Glasgow, and when I saw that Neil Gaiman liked it I simply had to have it.

With regards to Brave New World, I find that it is an interesting contrast to 1984 by George Orwell if you read them after each other. Unfortunately it's not a great literary masterpiece no. It's an easy and pleasant read though, you get through it fast.

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Just finished reading the "His Dark Materials" trilogy this week.

I actually now regret how emotionally involved with the characters I got, especially in the second half of the last book - and of course, in the heart-wrenching ending. I think Pullman went overboard trying to get readers to understand exactly what getting a daemon ripped out of your soul is like with the last few pages :blink:

As for what happens next, Pullman seemed to wrap up the story very well - the only real loose end he left is when Xaphania explains to Will that humans could travel between worlds in a similar manner to how angels do - this combined with the botanical gardens thing makes a future re-union more plausible. With everything else cleaned up so nicely it seemed a little incongruous. I can't decide if it is genuinely in there to imply possible future events, or if it has just been left in as a life-line to those that find the end of the book too depressing.

Of course, there isn't enough info in the book to substantiate the dispersion of the ghosts into Dust at the end of their existence - and that affects this too. Will and Lyra may have a deeper understanding of it than the reader is privvy to, and might see little reason in pursuing a way to see each other during this stage of existence, seeing as though they will be re-united in the next.

I guess this is all speculation. Apparently he's never again going to write anything containing the two of them together. I haven't read Lyra's Oxford, but I'm presuming there is not even a mention of Will in it.

I'm pretty torn about whether or not I want more. The ending, though emotionally draining, is heroic - they choose the fate of all others over their love, despite how pure and true it is supposed to be. They also choose the wise decision, to stay apart rather than grow sick and die within 10 years. A romantic ending could have felt kitsch and I guess that could be part of the reason Pullman avoided it.

Despite all that, I still found it depressing.

One of the things it has done though; this is my first time in a while reading fiction this good, from a literary perspective. It's made me realise how so much fiction is drivel.

Onto the Earthsea Quartet next.

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reading "The Shadow Of The Wind".

Started of pretty decent, but is turning into a snorefest.

My mum's just finished that, she thought it was brilliant.

I''m about to start it, a bit hard to read though apparently but I'm up for a challenge :blink:

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I am still reading 'Down and out in London and Paris' by Gorge Orwell, I am really enjoying it but I only ever seem to read it when I am on a train and in turn makes me really hungry!

Never read this book when you have the nibbles!

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I am still reading 'Down and out in London and Paris' by Gorge Orwell, I am really enjoying it but I only ever seem to read it when I am on a train and in turn makes me really hungry!

Never read this book when you have the nibbles!

You think that's bad, try reading Knut Hamsun's Hunger when you're a poor student and really can't afford to eat properly :blink: (this was years ago before student loans and the like).

I think that even if you'd just eaten Sunday lunch this book would make you hungry.

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You think that's bad, try reading Knut Hamsun's Hunger when you're a poor student and really can't afford to eat properly :blink: (this was years ago before student loans and the like).

I think that even if you'd just eaten Sunday lunch this book would make you hungry.

Oh I can imagine!

The detail Orwell goes into about how the main character starves on days on end is brilliant, but then you start to hear your own stomach rumble!

I seem to read this every time I visit my folks, so as soon as I get in Im raiding the fridge. I think my Mum thinks I don't eat (oh if only that were the case) cos I always seem to be starving when I arrive at hers!

Has anyone read 'The Dice Man' by Luke Rhinehart? My friend raves on about it so I grabbed a copy from Fopp. They sell loads of good books there for cheap! I grabbed a copy and I think that will be the next book if I ever finish this one!

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Oh I can imagine!

The detail Orwell goes into about how the main character starves on days on end is brilliant, but then you start to hear your own stomach rumble!

I seem to read this every time I visit my folks, so as soon as I get in Im raiding the fridge. I think my Mum thinks I don't eat (oh if only that were the case) cos I always seem to be starving when I arrive at hers!

Has anyone read 'The Dice Man' by Luke Rhinehart? My friend raves on about it so I grabbed a copy from Fopp. They sell loads of good books there for cheap! I grabbed a copy and I think that will be the next book if I ever finish this one!

I read it (again when I was a student) and its a pretty good romp. I'm not sure that it's the life changing manifesto that its sold as, but its amusing and interesting. Of course as a system it's deeply flawed because you still pick the list of possible outcomes of a dice roll, so it's not even remotely random, which seems to be what he's aiming at in the book.

Anyway, worth reading definitely. Much better than The Book of Est anyway.

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I'm having a real spate of getting part-way through books and getting bored at the moment...Mars (Ben Bova)

I just noticed this.

I read one book by Ben Bova, 'Orion', and found that it was the worst sci-fi novel I'd ever read. Since then, I've avoided him like the plague. Has he written anything good?

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