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What are you reading at the moment?


ChrisN
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Because I've never read it before! *hides* And the cover is actually that one, which seems to be suspiciously missing from online websites etc.

That's John Howe's Gandalf, which is of course the best portrait of the old wizard in my humble opinion. -_-

I'm reading Baudolino, by Umberto Eco. It's just lovely, gripping and Eco can be. Also reading a fantasy novel written by a friend, for illustration purposes. And about to being reading A Fire Upon the Deep, by Vernor Vinge.

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Basically it is the most interesting thing I've probably ever read.

Do you have parts 2 and 3 lined up? Because for my money they're at least as good as the first (I think 2 is the best). I don't remember which volume it's in, but the parts where Wilson writes about his daughter's murder are among his finest moments for me.

I just finished the Dark Tower series, which is probably a candidate for a longer and spoiler-covered post, but suffice to say that the ending didn't disappoint me. Then last night I knocked back Song of Kali by Dan Simmons in one sitting, which was recommended to me by forum chalk-scrawler Albert Fish. And that was pretty damned good, too. I was fairly stunned at the speed the pages went by - usually I'm easily distracted while reading, but I think working through the last few Tower books I've built up a head of steam that's still driving me on, though much of the credit has to go to Simmons too. It's Calcutta's own Don't Look Now, easily.

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I'm nearly at the end of Polity Agent by Neal Asher.

Which is the first of his books I've ever read.

Its really very good sci-fi. Like The Culture but a bit more violent and the polity isnt exactly a Utopia. Highly recommended and I've come in on the fourth book in the series. But I will be seeking out his previous tales.

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I've just finished Restless by William Boyd, which I thought was excellent.

I'm trying to read the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara by Terry Brooks but i'm finding it hard to get into it. A friend lent it to me after I said I wanted to read some fantasy.

I'm off to the library today, what's the first in the Culture series? I'd like to read that. I've tried with The Algebriast but I really disliked it. It's really horrid. :unsure:

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At the recommendation of this very thread, I've started The Count of Monte Cristo.

Its pretty good so far, although it took a while to get into the writing style, which is a little verbose by modern standards. The only problem is that I'm so familiar with the film, I keep seeing Richard Chamberlain as Dantes.

As soon as I've finshed that (I'm off work at the mo', so it shouldn't take too long), I've got The Princess Bride and then a book on World War I, as I'm off to the battlefields in April.

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The Harsh Cry of the Heron by Lian Hearn. The third in the Tales of the Otori series. Love them!

It's the fourth. It's Across the Nightingale Floor, Grass for His Pillow, Brilliance of the Moon, which i'm reading now. I'm not being picky, just hoping you've not missed one out! It's good news for me too, I had no idea there was a new one out. :unsure:

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It's the fourth. It's Across the Nightingale Floor, Grass for His Pillow, Brilliance of the Moon, which i'm reading now. I'm not being picky, just hoping you've not missed one out! It's good news for me too, I had no idea there was a new one out. :unsure:

I'll have to pass that one onto my other half, as she loves that series, too. Or maybe I'll just go off and order it for her now. Either way, forum result! Cheers.

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I have don quixote here, have been trying to start it for weeks but cant get past the folk songs that fill pages and pages at the start. Should i press on or give it up?

Definitely try and press on. The start is, admittedly, a bit slow, but once Quixote sets out from home it quickly gathers pace. There are some amazing scenes later on, with humour that seems amazingly fresh - quite astonishing given that it was written hundreds of years ago, although I guess the translation helps.

It is a long book, though, and to be honest it does drag a little in places in the second half (yet more quests which don't add as much as the earlier ones), but on the whole it's brilliant.

In case you didn't know, the book was written in two parts, with several years elapsing before Cervantes wrote part 2. In that time, some other guy wrote an unofficial sequel to part 1. When Cervantes finally wrote part 2, he wove in several references to this sequel into the story, which seems like a really early example of post-modernism.

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A friend lent it to me after I said I wanted to read some fantasy.

What fantasy have you read and enjoyed? I'd probably modify them based on your answers, but some recommendations off the top of my head are:

Perdido Street Station - China Mieville

Worldstorm - James Lovegrove

The Forgotten Beasts Of Eld - Patricia McKillip

Galveston - Sean Stewart

The Anvil Of The World - Kage Baker

These are all single volume books by the way. PSS is a bit of a door-stopper but it's self-contained.

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Dan Simmons has written other horror type novels, such as Summer Of Night (one of those rite-of-passage tales like IT, but far far shorter) and Carrion Comfort. I haven't read any of those so can't comment, but if you liked his writing I can highly recommend Hyperion and The Fall Of Hyperion.

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Dan Simmons has written other horror type novels, such as Summer Of Night (one of those rite-of-passage tales like IT, but far far shorter) and Carrion Comfort. I haven't read any of those so can't comment, but if you liked his writing I can highly recommend Hyperion and The Fall Of Hyperion.

I think ol' Fishy has a few more Simmons in his house, so I might give 'em a try. I don't know if the writing had the major impact on me or the story, which was very solid. It reminded me a fair amount of Iain Sinclair's White Chappel, Scarlet Tracings, substituting original manuscripts for second-hand books and managing to create much the same atmosphere - which is the writing, of course, but I wouldn't say Simmons caught my eye stylistically to any great effect. Which is often the mark of a good writer, I suppose.

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Just started, about 40 pages in, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. Aside from the fascinating social and legal impact of the book it is written in the most wonderful English, a sort of sing song cadence that reminds me of Nabokov.

Also, although one obviously can't judge a book my its cover the edition I have does have a wonderful one. Really macho.

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For my uni course I've just had to write an essay on the history of quantum theory, so I've been referring to bits of this...

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The maths is way beyond me, but the text is interesting (the contents clearly shows which chapters are biographical, and which are scientific). It's written by someone who knew him well. Wikipedia calls it "the definitive scientific biography", so it's nice to know I picked the right one to get from the library. <_<

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I just finished

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I got it for a Secret Santa present, I just recently moved and didn't have internet for about a week, so I got a chance to read it.

Anyone who enjoys historical fantasy novels, or Dickens or Austen will enjoy it. It even has footnotes.

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Justfinished Auster's New York Trilogy, which will demand a thorough re-read very soon- what a fantastic ending. Apparently the City of Glass graphic novel is £3 in Fopp, and will be purchased soon.

Next up in Alasdair Reynolds' Revelation Space, which I got for a quid in a junk shop. Looks promising.

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Next up in Alasdair Reynolds' Revelation Space, which I got for a quid in a junk shop. Looks promising.

Read through most of his books about 3-4 yrs ago. Enjoyed everyone of them. This reminds me I need to pick up his last few.

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I just finished

jslg.jpg

I got it for a Secret Santa present, I just recently moved and didn't have internet for about a week, so I got a chance to read it.

Anyone who enjoys historical fantasy novels, or Dickens or Austen will enjoy it. It even has footnotes.

Keep meaning too but it's a big book and don't think I'll ever get round to it. I think I'll just sit down and eat a cheese sandwich instead. I read page 1 though.

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