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What are you reading at the moment?


ChrisN
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Finished reading North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell recently; it is literally the worst book I have ever had to read. Since I've had to read it for A-level, that's not just a general not-my-kind-of-book, but also based on its credentials as a 'feminist' book. Yeah bloody right. Made up for it by having to compare it with Nice Work by David Lodge, which is actually quite good.

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Keep meaning too but it's a big book and don't think I'll ever get round to it. I think I'll just sit down and eat a cheese sandwich instead. I read page 1 though.

.::: Really, keep reading. It'll suddenly morph into a page-turner.

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My favourite story about Wittgenstein (apart from "and therefore Bertrand Russell is the President of the United States") is that when he was asked even sometimes simple trivial questions, he'd break into a sweat. The consequences would spiral out in front of him, and he'd extrapolate even the most idle thought into a long metaphysical wrangle.

He'd stand at the front of lectures, shivering, before having to leave the theatre. He'd go to the cinema and have to force himself to sit in front of a loud film for a couple of hours, just to force the thoughts from his head!

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Just started this on friday

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It's really good so far, a real pageturner. When I described what it was about so far (I'm about 80 pages in) to my girlfriend I realised how little had actually happened in it so far, but the way it's written makes every tiny detail seem important

There's two stories being covered, swapping round every chapter, one taking place in the present day and the other being early twentieth century Germany and they're beginning to meld together now. Looking forward to reading on, it's reminding me of Douglas Adams a fair bit

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  • 2 weeks later...
Flatland:

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Not that edition, a more recent one. It's really, really charming so far, especially the description of the one-dimensional women of flatland as babbling, deadly stilletos with the memory of a goldfish.

I have that edition! :lol:

I got it for Christmas one year. I found it quite enjoyable but a bit heavy going and overly whimsical. That was at the time though, I'd probably find it amazing re-reading it now.

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The plot in The Information is reasonably tight? Not as good as Money but still, there are a few nice threads. How far into it are you?

Not too far, about a hundred pages. Richards wife has just told him that his time to finish his book is up. There’s been a lot of stuff with the gangsters as well. I really liked Money and London Fields but this just isn’t grabbing me.

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Just read Frank Herbert's Dune again. Still the best book I've ever read. Also recently reread Against a Dark Background by Iain M. Banks. Not my favourite of his, but he's such a bloody good writer, even though I don't like the subject matter the world draws me in.

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I finished Cosmic Trigger and it was absolutely awesome, so as well as having the two sequels lined up, I'm also just starting this:

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: )

Excellent, Dave! Just don't try reading it in a box room lit only by a green light bulb whilst on mushrooms like I did once. Recipe for disaster. Make sure you track down 'Shrodinger's Cat' and the 'Historical Illuminatus' trilogy as well, all brilliant in their own way. I'm sure Rowan will back me up on that.

I'm currently reading: nothing. Just finished 'Use Of Weapons' for the nth time because it was £2 in Fopp. As ace as I remember it. I've got 'Only Revolutions' sat here as well but I can't bring myself to get back into it, no matter how fantastic I thought 'House Of Leaves' was...

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Currently reading:

A Scanner Darkly: Only got it as my mate managed to buy two copies and only realised his mistake a few weeks after. So he gave a copy to me as I'm the only other person in my uni house who likes Sci-fi! Its good but its not doing anything amazing for me. Just be easier to watch the film. :lol:

And

Guitar Man-

Which so far is amazing. Story of a 34 year old man trying to learn guitar in 6 months, talking to all sorts of famous guitarists and musicians along the way. Very well written, funny and a easy read. Also quite interesting to me, as I've only just recently started to learn guitar.

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Gonna pick up Song Man after I've finished it. Same author but this time trying to write a song with his new found guitar skills.

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Excellent, Dave! Just don't try reading it in a box room lit only by a green light bulb whilst on mushrooms like I did once. Recipe for disaster. Make sure you track down 'Shrodinger's Cat' and the 'Historical Illuminatus' trilogy as well, all brilliant in their own way. I'm sure Rowan will back me up on that.

Absolutely, though I was a bit let down by the final Historical book. The first two are great, though, especially if you're read Illuminatus and you know a little bit about Golden Dawn-style magic. Once of my favourite RAWs is Masks of the Illuminati, that's excellent and I can't recommend it highly enough. It doesn't really need any knowledge of RAW's other books.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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I’ve read all Carl Hiaasens 'adult' books so I’m reading his children’s books; that is, the books he’s written for children not books belonging to his children. It’s pretty good, CH has a great ear for dialogue and the characters are fun.

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A fairly standard Lawrence Block novel and so it's really, really good.

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I've just finished this (Blindness by Jose Saramago for those with pictures turned off):

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I've been meaning to read it for ages, I think I'd built it up in my mind to be something it could never quite live up to but I enjoyed it nonetheless. If you just take it at face value it works really well, there's some fantastic probing into the physical and mental difficulties you'd have to face if you were to suddenly go blind as well as other good observations on humanity in general. The trouble is that it's so obviously meant to work on an allegorical level too (people lose and regain the ability to see with no explanation at all) but I think it falls flat there, it seems like he doesn't really know the point he's trying to make. It's definitely well worth reading anyway, especially for a section towards the end that must be one of the most unsettling I've ever read.

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"Awesome in the totality of its vision, The Road is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation. The father and son move through the ruins searching for food and shelter, trying to keep safe from murderous, roving bands. They have only a pistol to defend themselves, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food, and each other."

This is the best, and most heartbreaking book I have read for a long time. I read it late 06 and it has stayed with me since. If you're not familiar with McCarthy's writing, you should be. If you like post-apocalyptic novels, try this.

Stunning.

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