Jump to content

What are you reading at the moment?


ChrisN
 Share

Recommended Posts

I really liked Cormac McCarthy's Border trilogy. I didn't know he had a new book out.

Anyway, I keep seeing ads for a new Philip Roth about town, glowing with praise. It's called 'Everyman' and apparently it's great. It has people saying so on the ad like John Banville and various other respected literary heavyweights I can't remember the names of right now.

I was just wondering if anyone had read it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm currently reading Virtual Light by William Gibson.

One of my favourite William Gibson books, that. I have a copy signed by WG himself. I got my copy of Neuromancer signed by him at the same time.

Anyhoo, I’ve finished those 2 ^ books and I’ve started The Gingerman by JP Donleevy. 20+ pages in and its great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just finished re-reading Behold The Man;

transparent-pixel._V42753713_.gif.

I'm an atheist but I think it will be a good read to anyone. It's very, very well written and easily the most accesible of Moorcock's books (I'm a big fan so may be a bit biased).

It's very good, basically it's a biography of a man who goes back in time and becomes Jesus Christ, but theres so much more to it than that. I'm frightened of spoiling it so it's best you just read it.

And if you're already a Moorcock fan, Elric or Corum?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

0330415298.02._SCLZZZZZZZ_SS500_.jpg

I’ve read all Carl Hiaasens 'adult' books so I’m reading his children’s books; that is, the books he’s written for children not books belonging to his children. It’s pretty good, CH has a great ear for dialogue and the characters are fun.

Didn't know he wrote for children too, I take it there are no former governors with empty eye sockets though? The first book of his that I read, Native Tongue, I got through in 4 days, which by my standards means it's essential

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Didn't know he wrote for children too, I take it there are no former governors with empty eye sockets though? The first book of his that I read, Native Tongue, I got through in 4 days, which by my standards means it's essential

Nah, no sign of Skink but there are a lot of the usual CH themes and plots; unscrupulous property developers with no concern for the environment, one guy trying to stop them, sharp witty dialogue etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just finished re-reading Behold The Man;

transparent-pixel._V42753713_.gif.

I'm an atheist but I think it will be a good read to anyone. It's very, very well written and easily the most accesible of Moorcock's books (I'm a big fan so may be a bit biased).

It's very good, basically it's a biography of a man who goes back in time and becomes Jesus Christ, but theres so much more to it than that. I'm frightened of spoiling it so it's best you just read it.

And if you're already a Moorcock fan, Elric or Corum?

I've always meant to read that, but my mom once told me pretty much the whole story on the phone, and I always think I've already read it.

And surely you mean Elric, Corum or Hawkmoon? Corum is the best obviously, but Hawkmoon is a very close second and Elric definitely last.

There's a cool Jerry Cornelius anthology knocking around at the moment too, well worth a look if you've never read all the Cornelius stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am reading Don't Tell Mummy: A True Story of the Ultimate Betrayal by Toni Maguire

Synopsis

This heart-wrenching memoir from Toni Maguire tells the deeply moving story of an idyllic childhood that masked a terrible truth. Underneath her mother's gentility and her father's roguish charm lay horrifying secrets, which eventually led to their only child's near destruction. The first time her father made an improper advance on Toni, she was six years old. When she finally built up the courage to tell her mother what had happened, her mother told her never to speak of the matter again. When the assaults grew worse her father warned her not to tell her mother, or anyone else, because they would blame her and wouldn't love her any more. It had to remain 'our secret.' At fourteen, Toni fell pregnant by her father and for the first time ever shared her terrible secret. Just as her father predicted, everyone blamed her. Although he was sent to prison, Toni continued to suffer, almost dying from a botched late abortion. She found herself judged and rejected by her family, teachers and friends, forced into a world of depression and madness with only herself to rely on if she ever hoped to build a happy life.

Book

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I've never read anything by Stephen King and decided I wanted to try some of his books. Anything particular I should start with? I've read a lot of Clive Barker's books; Are King's books a bit like Barker's?

Went to the library and got Needful Things. Haven't got far yet but it seems good!

Anything else by King I should try. Anything I should avoid?? He must have written some bad books too?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anything else by King I should try. Anything I should avoid?? He must have written some bad books too?

Many of his books are bad.

Avoid Cell like the plague, read The Stand though, as it's one of the best books evAr!

One man escapes from a biological weapon facility after an accident, carrying with him the deadly virus known as Captain Tripps, a rapidly mutating flu that - in the ensuing weeks - wipes out most of the world's population. In the aftermath, survivors choose between following an elderly black woman to Boulder or the dark man, Randall Flagg, who has set up his command post in Las Vegas. The two factions prepare for a confrontation between the forces of good and evil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm currently reading The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Not exactly one of the greats, but it makes me laugh.

I'm also reading World War Z, which really is excellent. A really nice way of putting a story across and a zombie theme without the usual silly gore fest. Marvellous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never read anything by Stephen King and decided I wanted to try some of his books. Anything particular I should start with? I've read a lot of Clive Barker's books; Are King's books a bit like Barker's?

Nothing like Barker, no. King is relatively conventional where as Barker is (well, was) pretty out there.

Go for the classics: The Shining, Salem's Lot, Skeleton Crew, Carrie, Christine, Misery, in fact anything before Needful Things. It's readable but not a patch on his earlier stuff. I'd back The Stand as well, though the end is total shit. King can't do endings. It's still more than worth reading though, don't let that put you off entirely.

I take it you've read The Books Of Blood by Barker? Better than anything King's ever done, some genuinely fucked up stuff in those stories...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never read anything by Stephen King and decided I wanted to try some of his books. Anything particular I should start with? I've read a lot of Clive Barker's books; Are King's books a bit like Barker's?

Went to the library and got Needful Things. Haven't got far yet but it seems good!

Anything else by King I should try. Anything I should avoid?? He must have written some bad books too?

http://www.rllmukforum.com/index.php?showt...hl=stephen+king

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing like Barker, no. King is relatively conventional where as Barker is (well, was) pretty out there.

Go for the classics: The Shining, Salem's Lot, Skeleton Crew, Carrie, Christine, Misery, in fact anything before Needful Things. It's readable but not a patch on his earlier stuff. I'd back The Stand as well, though the end is total shit. King can't do endings. It's still more than worth reading though, don't let that put you off entirely.

I take it you've read The Books Of Blood by Barker? Better than anything King's ever done, some genuinely fucked up stuff in those stories...

I've just got to stand up for Needful Things. That book really influenced me when I was younger, but I'm not sure why. I've read it within the last year too, so it's not just nostalgia. There's something in that book that really clicks with me in a way I can't really articulate. There's something about the way it captures small-town life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1857987489.02.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Just finished Alasdair Reynolds' Revelation Space, the first book in the titular series. An excellent hard SF yarn with some cunning science and, as the caption suggests, a magnificent alien artifact. However, his characters lack emotional depth, especially the near-interchangable female leads Volyova and Kouri IMO. And the pacing goes haywire near the end. Still, a very worthwhile read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just don't remember that much about it really. I remember thinking 'Meh, that was readable', hence my capsule review.

It certainly didn't have the same impression on me as my grandad forcing me to read 'The Raft' when I was a nipper. Never been quite the same...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I take it you've read The Books Of Blood by Barker? Better than anything King's ever done, some genuinely fucked up stuff in those stories...

Yup, I've read The Books Of Blood. They're very good! I've even read The Thief Of Always, which I also liked - even if it is supposed to be sort of a childrens book. But the cover reminded me of the cover for Alone In The Dark! The game that is ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I just finished Evil for Evil, KJ Parker's sequel to Devices and Desires (think it's the Engineers Trilogy or something). Just mind bogglingly good. So clever, with characters that are just brilliant creations and an overarching plot that is superb. I highly recommend these if you want to try something different. Fantasy for sure, but not your typical fare, that's for sure.

Have now just began Troy: Shield of Thunder by David Gemmell. His last book before he died. I imagine I may shed a tear when I finish it. Very good so far. Typical Gemmell really, which is compliment enough in itself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

0007209045.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_V22351446_SS500_.jpg

Very good, very well written account of the changes we're likely to see around the world as the planet shifts through 1-6 degrees of warming. Lots of detail. Each degree of warming get it's own chapter, and the results of the studies focused on that amount of warming are looked at.

A sobering read, at once both terribly informative and also appalling, like some sort of horror story. Well, it IS a horror story. Profoundly disturbing.

I still have a great deal of trouble dealing with most people's complete ignorance of the daunting challenges ahead, the destruction of millions of lives, the elimination of much of the planet's bio-diversity, the terrible wars that be will be fought over resources and biblical amounts of suffering. We are on course to enter the Age Of Lonliness, the Anthropocene, and people barely want to even discuss it.

I recommend to anyone, but particularly those who are unsure if action needs to be taken. It does, soon, and on a massive scale.

I've already read George Monbiot's excellent clarion call Heat: How To Stop The Planet Burning. Again, you really ought to read that. It's a point-by-point breakdown of how to achieve the necessary cuts in emissions.

The next book I read on the topic will be Lovelock's Revenge Of Gaia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll probably go read something else, then come back for the next one. AFAIK the books are relatively self-contained.

Chasm City is standalone, but Redemption Ark and Absolution Gap follow directly on from Revelation Space and you need to read them in sequence to understand what is going on.

The problem with Reynolds is that he has no firm grasp of pace. Century Rain and Pushing Ice both suffer from Exponential Plot Overdrive, as do his other books and it's a shame that he hasn't sorted this out considering his characterisation for the most part has improved with each book.

The Prefect looks promising, as it's a detective yarn set on Yellowstone prior to the Inhibitor series. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just finished The Player of Games by Ian M Banks, which seemed ok. Only really picked it up because it was the only half decent looking sci-fi book the library had in that day. I'm not convinced I'm going to be a massive Ian M fan though. I got the algebraist the same day and have read some of the start of that and it looks a bit heavy going..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.