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The Hobbit Trilogy


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RED Camera's YAY!

3D :facepalm:

Sure it can be watched in 2D, but the very idea that time is being spent on positioning the shots of the movie so that they are enhanced in 3D means that they'll be neglecting to create shots that are the best for a 2D image IMHO.

I only have to browse the cinematic stills thread and look at some of Lordcookie's posts to see that there's so much beauty in 2D cinema.

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New Line/Warner Bros. has officially announced that Cate Blanchett, Ken Stott, Sylvester McCoy, Mikael Persbrandt, Ryan Gage, Jed Brophy and William Kircher are on board for The Hobbit films!

Cate Blanchett, Ken Stott, Sylvester McCoy and Mikael Persbrandt have joined the cast of Peter Jackson's highly anticipated adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's epic 'The Hobbit.' Also joining them are Ryan Gage, Jed Brophy and William Kircher. The films, which are scheduled to commence principal photography in February 2011, mark Jackson's return to Middle-earth following his Oscar-winning 'Lord of the Rings' trilogy. The announcement was made jointly today by Toby Emmerich, President and Chief Operating Officer, New Line Cinema, Alan Horn, President and Chief Operating Officer, Warner Bros. and Steve Cooper, co-Chief Executive Officer of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.

Jackson, who directed all three 'Lord of the Rings' films, will helm the two films back-to-back, telling the story of 'The Hobbit' in two parts from a screenplay by Jackson, Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens and Guillermo del Toro.

Cate Blanchett ('Lord of The Rings' trilogy, 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button') will reprise her role from 'Lord of The Rings' trilogy as Galadriel, the Lady of Lothlorien. Ken Stott ('Charlie Wilson's War', TV's 'Rebus') will play the Dwarf Lord Balin, Sylvester McCoy (TV's 'Doctor Who') will play the wizard Radagast the Brown and well-known Swedish actor, Mikael Persbrandt ('Everlasting Moments', 'Day and Night') will play the shape-shifter Beorn. British actor Ryan Gage ('Outlaw', TV's 'Doctors') will play Drogo Baggins, with New Zealand actors Jed Brophy ('Lord of The Rings' trilogy, 'District 9') playing the role of the dwarf Nori, and William Kircher ('Out of the Blue'; TV's 'Legend of the Seeker') rounding out the company of Thorin Oakensheild in role of the dwarf Bifur.

Peter Jackson welcomed the news of Cate Blanchett's return to Middle-earth 'Cate is one of my favorite actors to work with and I couldn't be more thrilled to have her reprise the role she so beautifully brought to life in the earlier films' On the casting of Scottish actor Ken Stott, Jackson commented 'Fran and I have long been fans of Ken's work and are excited he will be joining us on this journey.' Jackson also welcomed the addition to the cast of Swedish actor, Mikael Persbrandt 'The role of Beorn is an iconic one and Mikael was our first choice for the part. Since seeing him read for the role we can't imagine anyone else playing this character.'

The actors join the previously announced cast including Martin Freeman (TV's 'Sherlock,' 'Breaking and Entering') as Bilbo Baggins, Richard Armitage (upcoming 'Captain America: The First Avenger'), Aidan Turner (TV's 'Being Human'), Rob Kazinsky (TVs 'EastEnders'), Graham McTavish ('Secretariat'), John Callen (TV's 'Power Rangers Jungle Fury'), Stephen Hunter (TV's 'All Saints'), Mark Hadlow ('King Kong') and Peter Hambleton (TV's 'The Strip'). Additional cast announcements include James Nesbitt ('Millions' and TV's 'Cold Feet') and newcomer Adam Brown.

'The Hobbit' films received a green light on October 15, and have release dates targeted for December, 2012 and December, 2013. Jackson will utilize groundbreaking visual effects and his incomparable storytelling to bring J.R.R. Tolkien's novel to the big screen. Both 'Hobbit' movies will be filmed in Digital 3-D, using the latest camera and stereo technology to create a high quality, comfortable viewing experience.

The two films are being co-produced by New Line Cinema and MGM, with New Line managing production, Warner Bros Pictures handling domestic distribution and MGM distributing internationally.

Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh and Carolynne Cunningham are producing the films, with co-writer Philippa Boyens serving as co-producer and Ken Kamins and Zane Weiner as executive producers. The Oscar-winning, critically acclaimed 'The Lord of the Rings' trilogy, also from the production team of Jackson, Walsh and Cunningham, grossed nearly $3 billion worldwide at the box office.. In 2003, 'The Return of the King' swept the Academy Awards, winning all of the 11 categories in which it was nominated, including Best Picture – the first ever Best Picture win for a fantasy film. The trilogy's production was also unprecedented at the time.

Read more: Blanchett, Stott, McCoy and Persbrandt Confirmed for The Hobbit - ComingSoon.net http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=72195#ixzz17T03nmr3

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Legolas is one of the prince elves of Mirkwood so no doubt they'll work him in during the section when the dwarves are captured.

What's the conditions of Jackson having to stick to the book as a source? Wasn't there a strict rule set dictating what he can and can't do with Middle Earth due to copyright. I seem to remember that he couldn't use anything from other things like The Silmarillion. I might have gotten this all totally wrong though as I can't remember where I heard it.

I suppose if Legolas was never referred as being in Mirkwood then artistic licence says he can adapt that to be the case.

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I believe that's to do with the Silmarillion's rights not being sold, and Christopher Tolkien not being willing to sell them.

Is there an understanding why?

Are the Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit movies simply in existence because they've previously been adapted and therefore had the copywrite for their production already released to the market?

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This is totally from memory but didn't the Tolkein family have a dust up with New Line about their share of the money from the first three films?

I may be completely wrong, but it would explain why they don't want to sell the rights to any more books.

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This is totally from memory but didn't the Tolkein family have a dust up with New Line about their share of the money from the first three films?

I may be completely wrong, but it would explain why they don't want to sell the rights to any more books.

Saul Zaentz still owns the movie rights (and also Tolkien Enterprises) to Lord of the Rings and Hobbit. Tolkien sold them himself in the 60's I think and Zaentz bought them way back in the 70's which is where the Bakshi film comes from. The Tolkien Estate has no official say in the films but are quite supportive.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Here we go then -

Warner Bros/New Line Cinema and MGM have announced the start of production on The Hobbit in New Zealand, which includes a full update on the signed cast (many of which have been previously announced or rumored, but a couple new additions):

Martin Freeman takes the title role as Bilbo Baggins and Ian McKellen returns in the role of Gandalf the Grey. The Dwarves are played by Richard Armitage (Thorin Oakenshield), Ken Stott (Balin), Graham McTavish (Dwalin), William Kircher (Bifur) James Nesbitt (Bofur), Stephen Hunter (Bombur), Rob Kazinsky (Fili), Aidan Turner (Kili), Peter Hambleton (Gloin), John Callen (Oin), Jed Brophy (Nori), Mark Hadlow (Dori) and Adam Brown (Ori). Reprising their roles from “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy are Cate Blanchett as Galadriel, Andy Serkis as Gollum and Elijah Wood as Frodo. Jeffrey Thomas and Mike Mizrahi also join the cast as Dwarf Kings Thror and Thrain, respectively. Further casting announcements are expected.

Director Peter Jackson has also launched a facebook page which will be updated throughout the production. The first updates includes two production photos featuring Jackson in a couple of the completed sets.

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post-242-069822600 1300691415_thumb.jpg

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After all the nonsense leading up to this point it's so nice to see Jackson at the helm. It just wouldn't have been right to have anyone else.

On some level I'm sort of looking forward to the documentaries on the DVDs more than the movies. Just to see the old band back together.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just listened to the audiobook trying to picture how some of the scenes will work on the big screen.

I'm not sure how they're going to tackle talking eagles and spiders, I usually find talking animals to look weird because their vocal chords aren't developed in the right way. It just bugs me. I can't imagine how the spiders are going to sound when they speak.

The big battle is going to be epic though, Jackson is surely going to show that in great length. The goblins, wargs, humans, dwarfs and mountain setting is going to be epic.

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I'm really exicted, Martin Freeman will be great I'm sure. Those who aren't fans should look at the sherlock homes thing.

Also hugely excited that for the first time ever we will see a proper, evil, cunning dragon in a live action film.

I hope though the feel of the film isn't too epic in feel as two towers and ROTK were. Fellowship was the best as it got the tone right, and I hope he can do that with the Hobbit.

Will he keep the relatively light tone of the book or make it a bit more like LOTR?

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I was wondering about that. Some of it is almost too silly in the book, while other parts are suitably scary and epic.

Take the trolls part, the way they get into the whole argument by putting on their voices and calling each other. It's completely comical, nothing like, say, the battle in the mines of Moria in LOTR. Jackson's going to have to hit a fine balance, because he needs to keep that warm fantasy vibe, whilst not making the whole thing too childish and silly, while being able to keep the darker parts of the story, suitably dark.

I think in someways it's a much harder task than LOTR.

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