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Slitherlink (NDS)


Cyhwuhx
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So what is the advantage of using dotted lines rather than just putting in a red line and erasing it if it's wrong? Does if affect your ranking?

I think it's just so that you can see which ones are the ones you're not sure about. IIRC you have to change the dotted lines to solid ones before you get your Completed!

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Im not that cakc handed

lol

This game is great - I didn't really 'get' it at first and I was making guesses all over the place, but I finally slowed down a bit (and found all the equivalences/rules that show up when you press that button on the bottom screen) and it makes a lot more sense. I'm about 20 puzzles through the second difficulty and I'm getting times of around 2 and a half mins to 4 mins, which doesn't seem too bad.

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I'm on the hardest difficulty now and didn't guess for about 95% of the puzzles. Sometimes you have to think dozens of moves ahead to figure out if a particular line leads to a dead-end. I'm not smart enough to figure that out without trying.

However, the biggest puzzles have a huge setback - slowdown. I never would've expected it to be a serious problem in this game but it's really really bad. I use the d-pad for input because for me it's much quicker than stylus and the slowdown gets so bad that it actually sometimes misses my input because it's busy doing whatever it's doing. Very disappointing for such a 'simple' game as this.

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I had to stop playing this about a month ago, because my mind was filled with slither links. I'd see 3s and 2s in my head and drop lines around them, try to joing them up... it actually impeded my sleep a few times. Like a song going around your head, but worse.

A shame, because I love it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm not quite feeling the love for this.

Done about half of the second set of puzzles, and only about two of the bigger wide ones. I'm still playing it from time to time, but it's not gripped me in the way that picross did.

I find the process of completing the smaller ones a bit mechanical. I just fill in some lines based on the basic rules, then join them up in the only way possible. There's no space for any creativity or much mental activity.

Then, with the larger puzzles, it goes too far the other way. The spaces I need to join up without help from the clues require slightly more brain power than I'm blessed with. I find myself staring at the gaps in horror for minutes at a time, with no clue forming in my mind as to how I should approach them.

I end up just guessing, and drawing in a trial line in the blue dots, and very often eliminate possible approaches that way, leaving only the real line available, but I don't feel like I'm working the puzzle out in my mind - with my imagination - I just feel like I'm mechanically trying all possible solutions and rejecting the failures, like a computer playing chess.

I think it's just a bit too hard for me.

Still, I'm glad I bought it, and it's well worth playing. Just not quite a 10/10 puzzle game for me.

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That's a shame. For me the difficulty curve was perfect: every puzzle wasn't quite mechanical, but I didn't have to think very hard either. I'd just be in some zen state where I thought of nothing else but the puzzle. I'd only occassionally get stuck for more than ten or twenty seconds without making progress, at least until the grids became enormous. I don't like to think too hard when I'm playing games: I find Advance Wars a bit of a chore for example, but I didn't find that with Slitherlink.

I thought it was very good at introducing new building blocks in an obvious way, and then assuming you'd recognise them in the later puzzles. Maybe you missed out on some important techniques early on, which made the later puzzles too difficult? Maybe you should go back a few levels? I don't think skipping straight to the big puzzles is a good idea. Are you using the crosses to thoroughly eliminate invalid lines?

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I'm the same with Advance Wars. I really enjoyed the early levels (on all versions), but found the later ones to be frightening and difficult, rather than enjoyable. There are loads of games I'd enjoy more if they had lots more easy levels.

Perhaps I'm missing out on some techniques. I skipped passed the tutorials as quickly as I could. I prefer to work things out for myself (for me, working out the techniques needed to solve puzzles is more fun than solving the puzzles themselves). Yeah, I'm trying to cross off all the dead ends and unusable routes, but I do miss a few. I am going through the puzzles in order, but I skipped forward to a couple of bigger ones just for a change, and I didn't enjoy them at all. Perhaps if I just do them in order I'll pick up the techniques as I go along.

I'm not really slagging the game off. I think it's great. My comments are really to do with whether the game is 10/10 'perfect' material, or merely a 'great' 8/10.

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Perhaps if I just do them in order I'll pick up the techniques as I go along.

This is certainly how it plays, on my journey through the 10x10s a few times you get a block of numbers that don't work with any of the techniques you know so far. Although when do decide to tackle it, it often turns out there is only one possible solution for that arrangement.

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  • 3 weeks later...

just started playing this...is it right that i should just be able to draw without thinking on the 9x9s ? weird stuff, never played anything quite like it.

too much minesweeper when i was younger i think.

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A BBC article about Sudoku, but Slitherlink gets a brief mention!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/6745433.stm

I like how the "Father of Sudoku" nicked it from someone else.

"This is fantastic," he beamed. "But it is really just for people who are puzzle fanatics. It's not like Sudoku which has universal appeal. Sudoku is enjoyed by people from five to 90."

Should read something like:

"This is fantastic," he beamed. "But it is really just for people who like actual fun puzzles. It's not like Sudoku which has universal appeal, because it can be made easy enough that even a halfwit can think they're achieving something by completing it"
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Fair enough for easy Sudoku puzzles which don't exactly require much in the way of logic skills. Have you ever tried a properly fucking nails Sudoku puzzle though when you're using 5+ logical deductions at once only to rule out the possibility of a number fitting in a square? Excellent mental workout that I seriously doubt someone could handle without some strategy and practise.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just got back from holiday and found this on my doorstep - just about managed to find my way around the whole thing, but as I got it from another forumite there's a save file already on it - can anyone tell me how to get rid of it, please?

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Just got back from holiday and found this on my doorstep - just about managed to find my way around the whole thing, but as I got it from another forumite there's a save file already on it - can anyone tell me how to get rid of it, please?



That's my file, Michael - leave it alone. wink.gif

Should have erased that - sorry.
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