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Slitherlink (NDS)


Cyhwuhx
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Dearest Acorn,

Firstly, I implore you read the review again, as wildly agape as your slack jaw may become, this time spotting the large amount of time I spend discussing why it is significant that this is a DS game, and quite how good a DS game it is, and not simply the pen and paper puzzle. It's odd that you missed it, what with it being a matter of such importance to you.

Next, and I'm not sure how this escaped you: It IS a DS game. I haven't simply leant a puzzle book on my DS and mistakenly thought it was being rendered on the screens. It's a released gaming product available to buy for a gaming console - that's sort of the remit for things getting reviewed on gaming review websites.

Since there are no other Slitherlink games for the DS that I'm aware of, I shall attempt to explain how reviewing such a thing works using the example of Picross. There are a number of Picross games available for the DS, of varying quality. Some are shit, others are mediocre, and others still are good. You see - it's not the inherent nature of Picross puzzles that are being reviewed, but their successful transplant onto the machine. Were it to simply be a case of judging the base puzzle, then a near-unplayable Picross game would be worth the same as a superbly implemented and neatly designed version. That wouldn't make sense, would it? Then there's the nature of the puzzles - some Picross games contain pleasingly presented Picross puzzles, but I would never rate them as highly as, say, Mario Picross, because the solutions are just random patterns, and not entertaining images. This puzzle design detracts from the experience.

Hudson's Slitherlink is so utterly perfectly designed for the DS, so beautifully implemented and playable, and each puzzle is wonderfully designed. I'm aware this sophistication is not apparent to you, but rest assured that it's important when reviewing a product.

A good example for you would be jigsaw puzzles. To review the concept itself would be, well, ludicrous. You need to review the individual puzzle based on its pattern, difficulty, and the quality of the pieces. Hudson's first game in this series is a jigsaw puzzle game, and as such all those elements must be taken into consideration, rather than simply rating Jigsaws as an ethereal idea. The designs aren't very interesting in this game. Then the slightly frustrating design of the product, and the lack of difficulty possible on a DS screen, would limit the mark rather. So to review it, I would give it 6/10. I'm not giving Jigsaws 6/10. Do you see?

John W

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I think I'll get this. And I am totally happy with the idea of something like this getting a 10 - I really don't see why it shouldn't, just because a player could theoretically get most of the enjoyment of it by playing a paper and pen version. I can see why someone randomly choosing between Gears of War and this on score alone might be peeved, but then again the same thing could just as easily happen with Gears of War and Samba de Amigo.

I've spent quite a lot of time playing the version on this page (which, by the way, has simple yet complete versions of pretty much every puzzle type ever, all written using some standard portable front-end), made by an acquaintance of mine:

http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/puzzles/

Infinite generated puzzles, not sure if this DS version has that, sounds to me like it doesn't. And if someone did what he asked and made a PocketPC version, just as handheld... EDIT: Oh, they've already done Palm versions, so there you go.

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I can sort of see where Acorn is coming from.

:lol:

Unrelated, but I had a bash at some online slitherlink, it seems a bit complex for me. I got distracted by Picross, though. Now that is my type of game. I've had a sly window open at work for the last two hours with a web-based one on the go.

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I can sort of see where Acorn is coming from.

:lol:

Unrelated, but I had a bash at some online slitherlink, it seems a bit complex for me. I got distracted by Picross, though. Now that is my type of game. I've had a sly window open at work for the last two hours with a web-based one on the go.

I've only just realised that Picross is the same as nonograms (or Gridlers, as they have been atrociously renamed) that have been in the Sunday Telegraph for years. You can also buy Griddler books from bookshops.

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When you fuck up a slitherlink on pen and paper you can have a shocker trying to finish it, especially if you've made a few mistakes. Gets nasty.

£13 for ~300 seperate puzzles in a tiny DS cart, in which I can backtrack moves beautifully, and not have to carry all the usual puzzling paraphernalia, for me is winner. Especially as I usually have my DS somewere in my bag anyway. Just for this reason I'll be buying it.

Review scores are pointless anyway. If after reading a games review, you feel positive about it, it should be worth ago. Regardless of whether it was awarded 2 or 10.

(Don't touch any of the <= 5 shite though.)

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Any decent guides to doing these slitherlink puzzles?

I got a version for my PDA, and I'm having a bugger of time trying to do even a simple puzzle; there always seems to be too many "unknowns".

I plan to write the Ultimate Guide, and then see if I can trick Eurogamer into paying me money for it : )

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Any decent guides to doing these slitherlink puzzles?

I got a version for my PDA, and I'm having a bugger of time trying to do even a simple puzzle; there always seems to be too many "unknowns".

This version shows you some hints on the top screen: A 3 next to a 0 implies a particular layout of lines and crosses, as does a 3 diagonally opposite a 3. Once you know some of those primitive building blocks, everything else follows.

I guess I could have a go at listing them somehow if you're having trouble, and if there isn't a guide available online.

*edit* No need, if Mr Rossignol is going to do something even better. I look forward to it. I've only just worked out what the notation on the third page of hints is supposed to mean.

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This version shows you some hints on the top screen: A 3 next to a 0 implies a particular layout of lines and crosses, as does a 3 diagonally opposite a 3. Once you know some of those primitive building blocks, everything else follows.

I guess I could have a go at listing them somehow if you're having trouble, and if there isn't a guide available online.

*edit* No need, if Mr Rossignol is going to do something even better. I look forward to it. I've only just worked out what the notation on the third page of hints is supposed to mean.

Why do you keep calling John Walker "Mr Rossignol"?

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I stuck this on my flash cart to see what all the fuss was about, played (stumbled because I didn't know what was going on) through 4 of them last night before I went to sleep and by the end I was getting into it. First thing this morning I wake my DS from it's sleep to just play a couple more. Ended up doing 13 more and was 20 mins late for work. Order placed at yesasia first thing this morning. My kind of puzzle game. Can see myself playing this rather than aimlessly surfing the web while the missus watches her crap TV programs. In fact I'm looking forward to get home to do a few more, rather than play any other game. Not sure why exactly, there is just something very satisfying when working one out, in fact you wonder why you were stuck in the first place, the answer is always so simple.

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Still on the 6x6ers. Some of them I'll stare at for 15minutes, scared and confused. Others I blaze through like a slitherninja to mad applause.

Tips appreciated...I'm not even sure I'm playing it properly sometimes.

What are the blue lines for?

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Why do you keep calling John Walker "Mr Rossignol"?

Oops. I got them mixed up. I think they've both written for Eurogamer, PC Gamer and have blogs that I read once in a blue moon, so they ended up sharing the same little box in my brain. Sorry.

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So when can we get an English version?

I think the Sudoku game in Hudson's Puzzle Series got a release here, but I don't think any of the others have yet. I wouldn't hold your breath. It's very easy to play the Japanese version.

It's a shame. If they were marketed right it would be nice to think they could find an audience over here, but I doubt it's going to happen.

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It's twenty quid for a puzzle book you could have bought for £1.50.

Since Acorn's mysteriously disappeared from this thread, I decided to do his research for him. I went down to my local Smith's (quite a large branch) and scoured the puzzle-mags shelf. It was 90% Sudoku, but I did eventually find a glossy publication called "Beyond Sudoku" which contained a variety of puzzles including some Slitherlinks. To be precise, nine Slitherlinks. The mag cost £2.99, meaning that to assemble the same number of puzzles as are found in the DS cart, you'd need to buy exactly 30 issues, at a cost of £89.70 compared to the £15 of the DS game (or the £1.50 of Acorn's entirely imaginary Big Book Of Slitherlinks). It would take 29 more months for all those issues to come out, and you'd be carrying around something the size of a telephone book, as well as half a stationery cupboard. So that's six times as expensive, maybe 20 times as bulky, and a two-and-a-half year wait in order to play black-and-white puzzles on paper with no music or retractable moves instead of on a fantastic, compact little handheld.

From this hard scientific evidence I conclude that Acorn is a total twat and this thread is over.

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Since Acorn's mysteriously disappeared from this thread, I decided to do his research for him. I went down to my local Smith's (quite a large branch) and scoured the puzzle-mags shelf. It was 90% Sudoku, but I did eventually find a glossy publication called "Beyond Sudoku" which contained a variety of puzzles including some Slitherlinks. To be precise, nine Slitherlinks. The mag cost £2.99, meaning that to assemble the same number of puzzles as are found in the DS cart, you'd need to buy exactly 30 issues, at a cost of £89.70 compared to the £15 of the DS game (or the £1.50 of Acorn's entirely imaginary Big Book Of Slitherlinks). It would take 29 more months for all those issues to come out, and you'd be carrying around something the size of a telephone book, as well as half a stationery cupboard. So that's six times as expensive, maybe 20 times as bulky, and a two-and-a-half year wait in order to play black-and-white puzzles on paper with no music or retractable moves instead of on a fantastic, compact little handheld.

From this hard scientific evidence I conclude that Acorn is a total twat and this thread is over.

You can get Nikoli's Slitherlink books from Eat Japan for £4 each, with each one having about 100 puzzles in. Whether you want to play the game on paper is another matter.

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Just downloaded this - hmmm I wasn't expecting so many text heavy menus etc. I messed about for ages and still haven't figured how to start the game. :)

<waits for US/EUR release>

There's an irritating tutorial which my wife found a bit baffling to get through at first, but it turns out you can skip it altogether.

Here's my full set of instructions to get you going. It's really playable for a non-Japanese speaker, so I hope nobody is put off by Joyreux's post.

First thing you get is choice of two buttons: these are the two save slots.

Choose the left one, and you get a text entry screen to enter your name. Pick your favourite Japanese characters.

Once that's entered, "OK" is the leftmost button at the bottom.

You get a dialog: choose option A

Then choose the top button to play a game.

You then get a choice of diffculty levels, the top one is the place to start.

It starts a one-time only tutorial. Skip through the first set of instructions with R.

Once the tutorial begins you can skip it entirely by pressing Start.

Once you're playing,

the buttons on the bottom screen (most of which are labelled with clear icons, not Japanese) are:

Draw Line

Draw Dotted Line

Draw Crosses

Eraser

Toggle Upper screen between overview, and useful hints that you can page through with R

Toggle Whether "Wrong" Numbers are highlighted in red

Show Options: Press B to return to game or Y to quicksave. It will automatically save when you complete a level, but this lets you resume a level part way through (or you can close the lid and make your DS hibernate).

I usually leave it on "draw line", and double click when I need a cross. You can also use the dpad.

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