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2000AD & The Meg

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4 hours ago, Darren said:

The new prog (2154, Hope on the cover, came on Saturday to subscribers but out on Wednesday for everyone else) answers some questions about Hershey's last request and raises quite a few more...

 

I subscribe to both mags digitally and the sods make me wait until Wednesday!

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Rebellion is launching a Best of 2000 AD limited series to the US direct market:

 

https://nerdist.com/article/get-to-know-the-best-of-2000-ad-with-a-new-monthly-series-exclusive/

 

Quote

The publisher shared a press release with us that’s filled with all the awesome details fans new and old fans need to know about what Rebellion is calling their “highest-profile ‘direct market’ release.” “2000 AD today announces it is launching a brand new title in April 2020 – Best of 2000 AD – as a new 12-issue US-format, perfect-bound series featuring a selection of the most incendiary and exciting new science-fiction comics from the legendary UK publisher. Launching in April 2020, Best of 2000 AD is intended as the ultimate 2000 AD mix-tape – an anthology of full-colour stories specially chosen to be accessible to a whole new generation of comic readers who may never have picked up 2000 AD in its traditional format.”

 

Aside from each issue being stacked to the brim with some of the absolute best stories from the history of the magazine, in full color, it’s also going to feature covers from a whole bunch of your absolute favorite artists. “The first new major monthly title from the British publisher in almost 30 years, the first 100-page issue will be headlined by a self-contained 48-page Judge Dredd adventure and supported by three of the stand-out series from the ‘Galaxy’s Greatest Comic’, primarily focusing on the critically-acclaimed Rebellion era. The title boasts brand-new covers from an all-star line-up of New York Times best-selling and Eisner award-winning artists including Jamie McKelvie (The Wicked and The Divine), Becky Cloonan (Gotham Academy), Charlie Adlard (The Walking Dead), Erica Henderson (The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl), and Annie Wu (Hawkeye), with more to be revealed. The entire 12-issue volume will feature design by highly-acclaimed designer Tom Muller (House of X/Powers of X).”

 

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I never have a clue what's going on issue to issue in Defoe. Never have right from the start but damn it looks fine.

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Lawless was created by Dan Abnett and Phil Winslade in Judge Dredd Megazine #350.

 

 

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Thanks

 

i saw that if I subscribed for a year I would get access to 3 months of back issues... that will not got very far back for the Meg though obvs. 

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It's not strictly 2000AD I know*, but the first volume of Pat Mills and Carlos Ezquerra's Third World War is out now. Apparently it's the first time it's ever been reprinted since its original publication in Crisis, 2000AD's attempt at a more mature comic, in the late 80s. The first issue came out in September 1988 just before I started university so it's very strongly associated with strident student politics for me, helped of course by Mills' "you can never be too on the nose" writing. I haven't started reading it yet but just flicking through takes me right back.

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1781087512/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

*it kind of is though, because one of the main characters in this story later showed up in his own (not especially good) series in the prog.

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4 hours ago, Darren said:

It's not strictly 2000AD I know*, but the first volume of Pat Mills and Carlos Ezquerra's Third World War is out now. Apparently it's the first time it's ever been reprinted since its original publication in Crisis, 2000AD's attempt at a more mature comic, in the late 80s. The first issue came out in September 1988 just before I started university so it's very strongly associated with strident student politics for me, helped of course by Mills' "you can never be too on the nose" writing. I haven't started reading it yet but just flicking through takes me right back.

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1781087512/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

*it kind of is though, because one of the main characters in this story later showed up in his own (not especially good) series in the prog.

 

Comixology also have this if digital is your thing. 

 

I had never heard of it before i really can't wait to give it a read. 

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Are you sure it's on Comixology? I just checked the UK site and they don't even have Rebellion listed as a publisher. I even checked Titan just in case someone else had the digital license (Since they do Hookjaw) but nothing.

 

Got a link? I wish Rebellion would come on Comixology. I really don't like their app.

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10 hours ago, Flub said:

Are you sure it's on Comixology? I just checked the UK site and they don't even have Rebellion listed as a publisher. I even checked Titan just in case someone else had the digital license (Since they do Hookjaw) but nothing.

 

Got a link? I wish Rebellion would come on Comixology. I really don't like their app.

 

Apologies same name but completely different book, good job that you questioned it or i would be reading a Euro title instead. 

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I'd buy the living shit out of Rebellion titles on Comixology. I'd certainly move my 2000AD and Meg sub there.

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You know what I'm loving at the moment? They've finally gotten robot Judges working, Dredd has accepted them *and* they've made them all individuals and good, funny characters in their own right. And it all felt natural.

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The best thing about Dredd is things like this, slow character development across multiple storylines.  He hated the idea of robot judges for YEARS, and now he's slowly coming round.  As a regular reader you go on the same journey as the character, over the same time periods.  I can't think of anything else that works in this way.  Nothing else in 2000ad does this, and when I used to read US superhero comics, nothing worked the same way due to the regular changes of creative teams, and shorter, self-contained story arcs.  Nothing in any other medium I can think of does this either (long running newspaper strips, or cartoons like The Simpsons, keep the characters the same forever.  TV soaps could potentially do this, but don't, as far as I'm aware). 

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Enjoying the current Devlin Waugh story. Yes. That's a demon dildo

FE75EB98-04CE-40EC-B040-8AFF69F8DC46.png

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I started (re)reading Third World War today - Pat Mills managed to go a whole two panels before getting in a not-so-subtle dig at his other employer!

 

1025092185_Screenshot2020-01-28at16_06_16.png.b9428c464998ad115908b4b916f230bf.png

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Is that a dig or a compliment? Maybe both, Pat is definitely generous with both. And it was the same employer, Steve McManus was even the editor of Crisis. 

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Yes it was basically OTT to 2000AD’s Tiswas (80s references ahoy) but I definitely read it as a dig. Maybe a bit of both, Pat’s always been one for enthusiastically biting the hand that feeds.

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On 12/03/2018 at 09:17, Rowan Morrison said:

I've started reading Mills' memoir about the 2000AD days (the Kindle version is nicely priced), and so far it might as well be called I Was Right and They Were Wrong. It's entertaining, though, and he has some interesting theories on what makes a good story (and why it rarely happens, except when he does it, unless he's been hobbled by "the Suits", which he does actually capitalise). It's a bit Citizen Smith, but if anyone in UK comics has earned the right to write a book like this, Mills is the man.

 

I started this over the weekend and it's really great. I'm only 3 or 4 chapters in but he's dropped an Alan Partridge-esq 'Needless to say I had the last laugh' twice so far; the first one was about a guy who suggested 2000AD be more like Heavy Metal magazine and ended up homeless and the second one about some guy who drowned in a swimming pool. Ice cold stuff from Mills!

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I haven't read this week's prog yet but I just read something about the Dredd story on Bleeding Cool. Shocked (not shocked in the slightest). I said it was a shite death and didn't feel right :)

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I downloaded the rebellion app and have stated with the original run of Judge Dredd, loving the art and, admittedly, straightforward stories. Remember reading them in the 80s and loving them too looks like it's going to be a long, and moderately expensive exercise to get through the whole lot.

 

If there's any standalone Dredd stuff that doesn't impact the time line per se that folks recommend I'd love the advice.

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5 hours ago, lolly said:

I downloaded the rebellion app and have stated with the original run of Judge Dredd, loving the art and, admittedly, straightforward stories. Remember reading them in the 80s and loving them too looks like it's going to be a long, and moderately expensive exercise to get through the whole lot.

 

If there's any standalone Dredd stuff that doesn't impact the time line per se that folks recommend I'd love the advice.

 

If I was going to read a load of Dredd stuff from the start the way you're doing it is exactly the way I'd do it. The idea is it's every Dredd story so ultimately there shouldn't be anything you'll miss. Except maybe the DC crossovers with Batman.

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Are you buying the Case Files? General consensus is that it really starts kicking off around Vol 5. That has Block Mania, The Apocalypse War and Judge Death Lives. That is some absolute peak Dredd, wow. Wagner and Grant on top form with the absolute masters on art duties - Ezquerra, McMahon, Smith, Bolland...

 

 Outside of that, it's kind of hard to give you a steer. A lot of stories impact the time line a little bit, but you wouldn't avoid them because of that. On top of that, loads and loads of great  (and hilariously funny) stories are one or two episodes and done, so even if we recommend some epic tales, you'll miss out on them. So while you should grab some collected epics, don't ignore the case files as they collect all the smaller stories too. 

 

One thing I will say is, I would hold off on Origins until you read a lot more Dredd. Hits much harder when you really get to know Dredd.

 

Off the top of my head, these are the big stories I've enjoyed the most that I haven't mentioned:

 

Any Chopper stuff

America (wait a while to read this)

Cursed Earth

Judge Child

Anything with Total War

The Pit

Tour of duty

Mutants in Mega City One

PJ Maybe stories 

Otto Sump stories

Day of chaos (leave this til much later)

 

I'm not mad on the Dark Judges, but the first storyline with Bolland on art is mint.

 

Couple of one offs - Bury my knee at wounded heart, The Runner

 

In general, John Wagner with or without Alan Grant writes the best Dredd stories. They worked under some aliases frequently: John Howard. T.B. Grover, Mike Stott, Keef Ripley, Rick Clark, Brian Skuter

 

 

 

 

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Do the case files collect the stuff from the annuals?  There were some brilliant colour McMahon Dredd stories in the early annuals that are amongst my favourites.

 

Early stories that really stuck with me are Requiem for a Heavyweight and the Uncle Ump one (so sad!).


I would suggest it's best to just read them all in order, as one of the unique aspects of Dredd is that he slowly changes over time, over the years, across multiple stories, rather than as part of discreet 'arcs' as in American comics. 

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2 hours ago, Don Rosco said:

Are you buying the Case Files? General consensus is that it really starts kicking off around Vol 5. That has Block Mania, The Apocalypse War and Judge Death Lives. That is some absolute peak Dredd, wow. Wagner and Grant on top form with the absolute masters on art duties - Ezquerra, McMahon, Smith, Bolland...

 

 Outside of that, it's kind of hard to give you a steer. A lot of stories impact the time line a little bit, but you wouldn't avoid them because of that. On top of that, loads and loads of great  (and hilariously funny) stories are one or two episodes and done, so even if we recommend some epic tales, you'll miss out on them. So while you should grab some collected epics, don't ignore the case files as they collect all the smaller stories too. 

 

One thing I will say is, I would hold off on Origins until you read a lot more Dredd. Hits much harder when you really get to know Dredd.

 

Off the top of my head, these are the big stories I've enjoyed the most that I haven't mentioned:

 

Any Chopper stuff

America (wait a while to read this)

Cursed Earth

Judge Child

Anything with Total War

The Pit

Tour of duty

Mutants in Mega City One

PJ Maybe stories 

Otto Sump stories

Day of chaos (leave this til much later)

 

I'm not mad on the Dark Judges, but the first storyline with Bolland on art is mint.

 

Couple of one offs - Bury my knee at wounded heart, The Runner

 

In general, John Wagner with or without Alan Grant writes the best Dredd stories. They worked under some aliases frequently: John Howard. T.B. Grover, Mike Stott, Keef Ripley, Rick Clark, Brian Skuter

 

 

 

 

 

Looks like you maybe the person to ask this, what was the name of the giant T-Rex character in 2000AD do you know?

 

I'm trying to find out exactly what it was same as a Polar Bear i remember too?

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Satanus wasn't it?

Actually a quick Google reveals it was Old One Eye first. Satanus is the offspring. 

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