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I hate gamecentral


Oh Danny Boy
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Slowdown here - what the hell's television text?

Beard?

If not, then I'll explain.

On English TV, if your telly supports it (most do) there is a service called "Teletext". You push a button on your remote and up pops a page of textual information. Each channel used to have their own text service. The idea was you started at a contents-page type place, and could tap in 3-digit codes on your remote to get other pages.

In a sense, it was like a primitive version of the internet, or a digital newspaper - but it was created and run entirely by the television companies. Things that it was famous for:

1 - News (you could read the latest headlines)

2 - Sports results (this is before the days of dedicated sports channels)

3 - Lifestyle features (bits and pieces on stuff like cooking, movie reviews and videogames)

4 - Cinema, theatre and concert tickets (basically just listings of what was on and where, as well as box office telephone numbers for you to call)

5 - Weird dating services and phone-in competitions

6 - Programming content complaints letters (I think the BBC did that)

7 - Quiz-type games (though they were a bit crap)

8 - Share prices

9 - possibly amongst the most famous uses, last-minute holiday bookings

Teletext is often joked about because of its necessarily brief and terse nature (there's a limit to how much info can be onscreen). The pages also used to update every 20 seconds or so to the next one so you could read a longer article, and there was no way of scrolling back until it reached the end and started over (Peter Kay joked about this with the holidays pages, that could be upwards of 50/60 pages)

I'm actually surprised it's still around, though I suppose it always did its job. Since the growth of the internet, I'd be surprised if it hasn't taken a beating.

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Beard?

If not, then I'll explain.

On English TV, if your telly supports it (most do) there is a service called "Teletext". You push a button on your remote and up pops a page of textual information. Each channel used to have their own text service. The idea was you started at a contents-page type place, and could tap in 3-digit codes on your remote to get other pages.

In a sense, it was like a primitive version of the internet, or a digital newspaper - but it was created and run entirely by the television companies. Things that it was famous for:

1 - News (you could read the latest headlines)

2 - Sports results (this is before the days of dedicated sports channels)

3 - Lifestyle features (bits and pieces on stuff like cooking, movie reviews and videogames)

4 - Cinema, theatre and concert tickets (basically just listings of what was on and where, as well as box office telephone numbers for you to call)

5 - Weird dating services and phone-in competitions

6 - Programming content complaints letters (I think the BBC did that)

7 - Quiz-type games (though they were a bit crap)

8 - Share prices

9 - possibly amongst the most famous uses, last-minute holiday bookings

Teletext is often joked about because of its necessarily brief and terse nature (there's a limit to how much info can be onscreen). The pages also used to update every 20 seconds or so to the next one so you could read a longer article, and there was no way of scrolling back until it reached the end and started over (Peter Kay joked about this with the holidays pages, that could be upwards of 50/60 pages)

I'm actually surprised it's still around, though I suppose it always did its job. Since the growth of the internet, I'd be surprised if it hasn't taken a beating.

It was a bit of a beard and now you've made me feel like a bit of a dick... ;)

I didn't realise they could backfire like this to be honest. Anyways your post was pretty informative and I'm sure if somebody didn't know what Teletext was they probably do now but I've been using it since the days of Fat Sow and Digitiser. If this isn't some kind of double beard then *man hugs*.

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GC really isnt that bad.

Considering the amount of space they have I think they do a good job with what they have. The reviews on there have been pretty much spot on most of the times and they don’t seem to get too caught up in a lot of the hype that does the rounds.

The "in the middle" section and the viewers article that is on at the weekends are a bit hit and miss, although there was one a few weekends ago from a guy whose son was being bullied at school and he was explaining how gaming had helped him come out of his shell and helped him deal with things in real life, it wasn’t too bad.

There can be some idiots in the letters pages though but that’s not exactly unusual, have to laugh at the moment as after the Mario review the are just being accused of Nintendo bias. Every other week they get accused of favouring one or the other so they cant win.

All in all I like it and it gives me my first bits of gaming info before leaving for work and getting on here to find out the more in depth stuff.

Plus they love Transformers so its all a bag of win really.

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All I know about GC is I was more heartbroken when Steven Bailey stopped doing it, than when Mr Biffo stopped writing Digi. And I loved Digi!

I think it's improved since then myself.

But seriously, I hate Gamecentral with a passion; no matter how many times I ask, they won't tell me the bloody release date for Shenmue 3.

Seriously though... seiously... I don't have a bad word to say. Viewers feature is hit & miss but at least they offer a soapbox for people, which is a good thing.

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