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Games Workshop, An Appreciation Thread


Lorfarius
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So after playing Space Marine (the computer game) I'm in a bit of Games Workshop crazy mood. I've always liked the idea of painting miniatures but usually don't get very far before getting annoyed about how my skills just aren't anywhere close to what 'Eavy Metal people and the like can do (which isn't a surprise given they spend a lot of time doing it and I struggle to paint a single model in a decade!). So I dug out my box of remaining miniatures and paints and as usual given the time between these painting bouts I was surprised by the contents. I thought I just had a box of tactical marines that I hadn't even got round to fully assembling but discovered I also had a squad of ratling snipers, a space marine scout squad, a catachan sergeant, some Necromunda guy with a heavy stubber, an Executus assassin, and an assortment of semi-painted plastic terminators and space marines that for the life of me I don't know how I came by them (or even if I'm the 1 that painted them). Inevitably all my paint was pretty solid but seemed salvageable (which makes a change) and my plastic glue seemed to have solidified completely.

Anyway I actually managed to paint a whole space marine (I probably should have assembled the rest of the marines and painted them all together but I'm not clever like that) and then came across a problem I always have. How the fuck are you meant to get those fiddly little transfers to settle nicely onto space marine shoulder pads? They always end up creased and never want to stay still when you try to massage them flat. The 1 person I know with any experience of this kind of thing said I should just free hand whatever it is I want there but all thats likely to happen if I try that is an extra large shoulder pad due to many layers of painting over shit attempts.

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I imagine there're quite a few people here who play 40k quite often. What's the scene generally like for these in store game nights?

I'm thinking about getting the boxed set, but I know none of my friends or family would ever play it with me.

I'm 28 I don't know if I can bring myself to go if all the game nights are populated entirely by thirteen year olds

It does very a bit from store to store but generally speaking if you can get yourself down to the "veterans night" then you should be ok as they are geared towards the 16+ and usually have a lot of people over 18 playing games and stuff. Try and avoid the beginners events if at all possible as they will be full of 10-13 year olds.

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I'm not in Herefordshire, nor do I play 40k, but just to support what Benji said: in my experience most of the gaming nights are generally a good mix of adults and young 'uns, who usually end up playing one another, so unless you're very unlucky I'd expect the same to go for your local.

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So I finally finished my Genestealer test paint jobs, ahead of doing the 22(!) for Space Hulk at some point. These 3 fellas are from Space Crusade.

The first one is earlier in the thread, so you can see him there. Purple carapace and flesh coloured skin and it worked ok, but the contrast between the two colours wasn't strong enough.

I decided to do a test on a traditional Genestealer paint job:

post-2339-073192000 1316610956_thumb.jpe

post-2339-085770100 1316610948_thumb.jpe

The purple has come out a little too dark - I probably should have dry brushed it over similar to the previous one, but I'm surprisingly happy with it in the flesh. It took a fucking long time to do in comparison though, so if I go this way I think I'll need to suss out a faster way to do things.

Then I decided to go back to the bone Genestealer that the first one looked "horrific" as, something a little more alien.

post-2339-095351700 1316610941_thumb.jpe

post-2339-046068800 1316610934_thumb.jpe

The green didn't work at all until I chucked some Badab Black on it to tone it down, but it's come out pretty nice. Certainly the easiest of the three to paint - it is just bleached bone with Devan Mud across 90% of it - but something's not quite right. I think it's the green.

I'll probably have to do some more testers - none of the 3 works perfectly, and right now I'm torn between the traditional (with a speeded up paint method) and the Bonestealer but with light purple skin instead, I think.

They all look better in person than they do in these photos btw, though the eyes are universally shit unfortunately.

post-2339-045939900 1316610979_thumb.jpe

The great thing is, it's such an easy way to learn. I'm already better with brushes, already know I'll NEVER undercoat from a spray can again (I've destroyed the detail on some of these Space Crusade figures, unfortunately) and I'm not going to get too hung up on these marines as they're shit models that I can't do much at all with.

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already know I'll NEVER undercoat from a spray can again (I've destroyed the detail on some of these Space Crusade figures, unfortunately) and I'm not going to get too hung up on these marines as they're shit models that I can't do much at all with.

:o Madness. You must just be holding it too close or holding the nozzle down for too long. Undercoating with a brush isn't something i'd even consider.

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Yep, speed is the main loss - particularly if you ever go for any metal models, which normal paint will have a hell of a time sticking to. That said, undercoating and priming are different things - the undercoat would be the base colour you apply after priming the model; you prime with spray paint, you don't undercoat.

But, er, anyway: if you're using any of the sprays designed for models (e.g. the Army Painter or Games Workshop sprays) then you should get good results, so long as you follow the instructions. But the main thing to bear in mind is that as you're priming, not undercoating, you don't need a thick layer - just enough for any successive layers of paint to adhere to. Just a light layer of whatever colour you're using. Black, white or grey are the typical base colours, and will have an effect on the tone of any colours layered on top of them (white unsurprisingly leads to more vibrant colours, black to duller), though there may be occasions where you actually want the primer colour to be naked on parts of the model (e.g. me and my warriors of Minas Tirith, which were spray painted with Army Painter platemail, which I then painted around, leaving their armour the colour of the primer (well, with some Badab Black wash applied to weather it)), but those are the exception rather than the rule.

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Heh, undercoating is priming, what you're talking about is basecoating where you start putting on a base of a certain colour. The problem with applying an undercoat or primer with a brush and using a thin layer is that the paint doesn't have anything to stick to. It will naturally run into the deep areas of the model and pool there resulting in those areas having a decent amount of paint and arguably the areas that need the undercoat most largely free of paint which means that successive layers both will be harder to apply and will rub off more easily.

The colour of the undercoat is largely irrelevant too unless you're using it to save time such as that in the case mentioned above with the metal or in my own case of trying to paint yellow space marines. It used to be a case that white was better for vibrant colours as those were the colours that were harder to paint over black (such as yellow) so it required a lot more coats to get the same effect. By contrast a black undercoat allows you to be more lazy as it allows for less work to get shading and you can easily leave parts unpainted and it won't be as obvious as with a white undercoat. In these days of foundation paints and the like though it's not as much of an issue. In fact i've been switching between black and white for my last few armies and I think you'd be hard pressed to actually tell what undercoat was used. I could probably use bright pink and it wouldn't matter.

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Busy painting up this guy...

IMG_0145.jpg

Cannot tell you what fun he is. Really fun figure, but an absolute wonder from a technical point of view as far as I'm concerned - the way it's been sculpted with total regard for the plastic mould is brilliant. It fits together absolutely perfectly, with very little work to do.

This is a good thing indeed :)

3 hours work so far. I'm a speedy bugger when I'm enjoying it.

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Heh, undercoating is priming, what you're talking about is basecoating where you start putting on a base of a certain colour.

What do you mean, I should know my terminology by now? ;)

You're right about foundation paints rendering primer colour largely irrelevant, but that does rely on you using foundation paints in the first place - for some colours I do, for others I don't, so I still tend to consider what I'm painting before priming.

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Heh, undercoating is priming, what you're talking about is basecoating where you start putting on a base of a certain colour. The problem with applying an undercoat or primer with a brush and using a thin layer is that the paint doesn't have anything to stick to. It will naturally run into the deep areas of the model and pool there resulting in those areas having a decent amount of paint and arguably the areas that need the undercoat most largely free of paint which means that successive layers both will be harder to apply and will rub off more easily.

That's not an issue if you use a proper primer rather than skull white/chaos black. I use vallejo white primer and even when slightly thinned I need only one coat. Brushing on the undercoat the mini gives me more control and a minimal amount of detail loss. Ideally, I'd use an airbursh with black followed by a directed white for some preshading but the cost and noise is excessive at the moment.

3 hours work so far. I'm a speedy bugger when I'm enjoying it.

Amazing stuff as always.

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Busy painting up this guy...

IMG_0145.jpg

Cannot tell you what fun he is. Really fun figure, but an absolute wonder from a technical point of view as far as I'm concerned - the way it's been sculpted with total regard for the plastic mould is brilliant. It fits together absolutely perfectly, with very little work to do.

This is a good thing indeed :)

3 hours work so far. I'm a speedy bugger when I'm enjoying it.

Is it wrong of me to want to pop all those spots and boils?

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As of last night, my Gondorian army is finished. 204 models painted to a standard I'm happy with, with 173 of them painted after June 17th (17 of which I'm not actually using). I'm quite pleased with myself! I'll post pictures later, once I've got the figures lined up ready to pack for transport.

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Congratulations on finishing them off, and good luck for the weekend. I kind of wish I was going, as they're going to be selling Tamurkhan (the Forgeworld fantasy campaign book) at Games Day. Sadly, I don't think the wife fancies the drive followed by the wait just so I can queue for a book.

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Would you like me to look up this book and then regale you with stories of how wonderful and amazing it was, and how you should have come? ;)

(of course, as the tickets are sold out already, I imagine getting in would be something of a challenge for you even if you did travel up)

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It'll be available to buy online within the month, I'm sure, but until then - yes, go forth and bask in its magnificence, as it takes Warhammer Fantasy in the direction GW would have gone were they not a publicly traded company. Essentially, it's the first book of the Warhammer universe's apocalypse and contains the rules for the Chaos Dwarf army amongst other things (such as a flying demonic bull).

baletaurus9.jpg

As for sold out? Wouldn't have been a problem - I'm sure I could have persuaded a small child/vulnerable adult to give up their ticket...

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Well, if you want the book sooner I don't mind picking a copy up for you if I get the chance - I'm heading down to Slough next weekend, and will probably be heading to London to drink in Ravenscourt Park on the Saturday (if not, I'm sure I can convince the GF that we should visit a museum in London on the Saturday or Sunday), so you'd be welcome to come and grab it off me. Of course, this relies on the book not selling out before I get to the Forge World stand ;)

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Thanks for the offer, but I can't really countenance asking you to stand in the notorious Forgeworld queue for me. It's been known to turn into a scrum version of the Asda deli queue, so I can probably hang on for a few weeks without too many ill effects. Appreciate the offer, though.

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If you're sure! I've covered warscomputer game and comic conventions you know, I'm used to crowds of overexcited nerds pushing and grasping for precious items ;)

(though the worst I've ever experienced was no convention - but a day-long sale at a tiny anime and manga store in Adelaide; at a push, it could hold about four people before getting crowded. Over 100 people showed up before it had even opened that day - police actually ended up coming and calming the herd. Was quite the thing)

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