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Games Workshop, An Appreciation Thread


Lorfarius
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I've only recently started to get into them, even re-reading some of the stuff I read in my youth, but as part of a 5 star review series here's my brief thoughts:

WH40K: Assault On Black Reach **

WH40K: Deathwing ****

WH40K: Heroes Of The Space Marines ****

WH40K: Space Hulk **

Both Black Reach and SPace Hulk just felt like scenarios rather than stories - there was no jeapardy, even as the Space Hulk novel went weird. There was some nice background stuff in there but it didn't really work for me. Deathwing is well regarded anyway as a set of short stories and it still holds up well. Heroes Of The Space Marines was weird in that it's mainly about evil forces, which kinda confused me. It's bookended by some good pieces and was an an interesting read in a non-chapter way.

I'm just a short way into the first Horus Heresy book and it's way above and beyond any of these though. The quality of the prose and characterisation is pretty damned superb.

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But, at 21 quid for 5 weaponless marines, another tenner for 10 umbra-pattern bolters, and a further tenner for the heavy weapons, that's a lot of wedge for 5 marines.

They are lovely but expensive. You are probably better off trying to get the originals on ebay IMO.

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Well I was thinking of the metal ones:

astro50c100marines-01.jpg

How many do you get in the box for £80? If it is a new box that makes 30 that is probably cheaper than GW's current range never mind Forge World.

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30.

A vanilla marine tactical squad is now £23, so £69 all-in for the same amount of marines as an RTB01 box. so buying new works out cheaper. just.

as far as the metals go, though, It's possibly heresy to say so, but I never liked them. the RTB01s were pretty good, and the metal-with-plastic-arms that became the norm from about about 1990 I liked, but that first batch of Rogue trader marines? no thanks. They just don't look right to me any more.

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idespair - that fire looks gorgeous. Well, they all do, but that fire especially.

The fire effect is really easy to copy, as the flames are nicely sculpted. Allow time for paint to dry after each step.

1. Undercoat the flames with a light brown.

2. Paint over the top with white, although not too thickly. Make sure there's solid coverage near the base leading to almost none at the top. Don't worry about getting into every crack.

3. Mix a yellow/orange (Privateer Press' Heartfire is perfect for this) paint roughly 50:50 with water, and wash it heavily over the whole flame section. It should naturally pool in the recesses - this is fine, just take off any extra which threatens to run off the bottom onto the rest of your figure.

4. Use a stone or bone colour (GW Deneb Stone, PP Menoth Base) to highlight a few edges.

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I love that picture, the first time I think any of the artists had attempted the Emperor properly (aside from the odd sketch or pic of him as a skeletal husk surrounded by tubes)

horus_vs_emperor.jpg

The best version I can find.

I treasure my copy of Lost and Damned

I seem to remember Mike McVey doing a very impressive diorama of that scene.

And idespair those ogres are fantastic. I received the battalion set for my birthday and I hope they turn out as good as yours.

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I need some help. I painted all of the parts of this terminator separately before assembling. To make it easier to handle I left part of the sprue attached to the feet and so it wasn't until I tried to glue the figure to the base that I realised that the angle is such that it looks like he is falling over. Does anyone have any suggestions how I can fix this?

6741757467_f913bf1a9c.jpg

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The only relatively easy solution I can think of would be to alter the base - to be more precise, give him some sort of sloped object to rest his feet on; some sort of ramp. As it's 40k, I imagine some sort of rubble would be most appropriate, but beyond that I'm not sure what to suggest. I know that GW sell pots of assorted universe-appropriate rubble, which could well hold something suitable to have him run up.

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To me it looks more like he is charging in to combat, but that might just be the angle the photograph is taken from............

It's more obvious from the side like almost 45%. :(

The only relatively easy solution I can think of would be to alter the base - to be more precise, give him some sort of sloped object to rest his feet on; some sort of ramp. As it's 40k, I imagine some sort of rubble would be most appropriate, but beyond that I'm not sure what to suggest. I know that GW sell pots of assorted universe-appropriate rubble, which could well hold something suitable to have him run up.

Sounds good. I think I can use some green stuff for that.

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Whilst we are getting nostalgic this year is the 25th anniversary of rogue trader. To celebrate there will a limited edition release of the crimson fist space marine holding the ork head from the cover art. Oh yeah and lotr is finally some new releases. All good except I've already used the gw vouchers I got for my birthday last week :( the lack of advance notice for gw releases is very frustrating.

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Sounds like they're relegating WOTR to specialist game status, sadly - guess that means more big packs of plastic are out. Still, more models for the LOTR range are always welcome, even if they're all pricey finecast models.

Poor, wonderful WOTR, a shame to see their greatest system ignored.

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Aye, as it's still played with the LOTR models (i.e. 28mm, slightly smaller than the 'heroic' scale of 40k/WHFB), the scale isn't up there with Warmaster or Epic 40k, but it plays a little more closely to those than to WHFB or 40k in the way that it treats units as, well, units - formations divided into companies, with formations automatically destroyed upon the last company reaching half-strength. Heroes are important, but not in the same way as the other GW properties - they buff units and give them the opportunity to act out of turn (and some are geared towards assassinating other heroes), but they sit around in formations and are killed when the formation they're in is destroyed. There's also no magical equipment or such to worry about - formations can be given a few extra men (banner-bearers, hornblowers etc.) but you don't see people spending hours working out which amulet to give that bloke over there.

All of which leads to a refreshingly tactical game, especially when combined with the phase-based structure - rather than having a turn each, the phases are played out in turn - so I move, then you move; I shoot, then you shoot; I charge, then you charge etc. That, combined with the fact that units with characters in have the potential to act out of turn (e.g. charge in the opponent's charge phase), and the fact that positioning is desperately important (cavalry do 400% more attacks (and, with lances, those attacks have a significantly higher chance of piercing the enemy's armour) on the charge, and that being flanked means losing 3 or 5 dice per company of retaliatory attacks, which stacks)* means that clever manoeuvring means everything.

Unfortunately, the armies were released somewhat unbalanced, and never updated - while most are competitve, some (Angmar and the Elves) are desperately underpowered - and not in a power-building sense, in a 'every one of their basic units is overpriced and ineffective' kind of a way. Other than that, though, it's an incredibly elegant game, and it's damned shame that none of GW's other core games have borrowed its ideas.

*which, when a company of infantry gets 8 attacks to start with...

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Pictures from this months White Dwarf have started to filter though - some of the new LOTR stuff is looking lovely, and the first wave seems focused on bulking out the forces of Moria (my main evil army). DakkaDakka has a thread which is filling up with images (and bile from non-LOTR players), so I won't link them all here.

321406_md-.jpg

321483_md-.jpg

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Aye, as it's still played with the LOTR models (i.e. 28mm, slightly smaller than the 'heroic' scale of 40k/WHFB), the scale isn't up there with Warmaster or Epic 40k, but it plays a little more closely to those than to WHFB or 40k in the way that it treats units as, well, units - formations divided into companies, with formations automatically destroyed upon the last company reaching half-strength. Heroes are important, but not in the same way as the other GW properties - they buff units and give them the opportunity to act out of turn (and some are geared towards assassinating other heroes), but they sit around in formations and are killed when the formation they're in is destroyed. There's also no magical equipment or such to worry about - formations can be given a few extra men (banner-bearers, hornblowers etc.) but you don't see people spending hours working out which amulet to give that bloke over there.

All of which leads to a refreshingly tactical game, especially when combined with the phase-based structure - rather than having a turn each, the phases are played out in turn - so I move, then you move; I shoot, then you shoot; I charge, then you charge etc. That, combined with the fact that units with characters in have the potential to act out of turn (e.g. charge in the opponent's charge phase), and the fact that positioning is desperately important (cavalry do 400% more attacks (and, with lances, those attacks have a significantly higher chance of piercing the enemy's armour) on the charge, and that being flanked means losing 3 or 5 dice per company of retaliatory attacks, which stacks)* means that clever manoeuvring means everything.

Unfortunately, the armies were released somewhat unbalanced, and never updated - while most are competitve, some (Angmar and the Elves) are desperately underpowered - and not in a power-building sense, in a 'every one of their basic units is overpriced and ineffective' kind of a way. Other than that, though, it's an incredibly elegant game, and it's damned shame that none of GW's other core games have borrowed its ideas.

*which, when a company of infantry gets 8 attacks to start with...

That's a shame - sounds like fun.

I'd never want want to get into it though because I hate finecast.

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Heh, well LOTR is still their best system if you genuinely hate Finecast, as its second-class status has meant most of it still hasn't been converted from metal :lol:

(That's changing, of course, much to my happiness - I actually quite like Finecast, if not the price tag attached)

Still, if you ever see it cheap I'd recommend picking up the rulebook - as it's all played with models on generic 25mm bases, adhering to historical/fantasy norms, there's nothing you couldn't easily proxy with some other company's models.

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Heh, well LOTR is still their best system if you genuinely hate Finecast, as its second-class status has meant most of it still hasn't been converted from metal :lol:

(That's changing, of course, much to my happiness - I actually quite like Finecast, if not the price tag attached)

Still, if you ever see it cheap I'd recommend picking up the rulebook - as it's all played with models on generic 25mm bases, adhering to historical/fantasy norms, there's nothing you couldn't easily proxy with some other company's models.

Thanks. A couple of friends and I are looking at starting Legends of the Old West which is based on LOTR with some Necromunda thrown in. So I like the basic rules.

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LOTR and WOTR are very different games, mind - LOTR is a more traditional skirmish game (hence its being pillaged for LotOW), while War of the Ring is an unusually refined* game of massed battles. It's also a lot cheaper to get the rules for WOTR, as they're confined to a single book, rather than spread across a tone of supplements!

*in the "elegant rules" sense, not the "game to bring out at a fancy soirée" sense. Though, having never been to a fancy soirée, I suppose I could be under a misapprehension there...

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