Jump to content

Games Workshop, An Appreciation Thread


Lorfarius
 Share

Recommended Posts

I’ll bet they’re ridiculously statted. 
Like  minimum T5 across the board, 3+ WS/BS, 2 wounds per infantry model. Probably slow though.  But then bikes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, And said:

They’re going to be absolute tanks I reckon. New starter box with marines then?


I keep on thinking that Squats and Tau would be a nice team-up operation. Both love their tech ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheers. A mate and I were discussing it the other day. We don't play any of the games, and were hoping they might put some BL stuff in there at some point, otherwise there isn't much interest in that side of things. The interface is horrendous anyway though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not over black, but similar-ish technique for necrons and stormcast. Spray silver, contrast, drybrush silver, done. Then just go back and do whatever details want doing. 
 

We’ve sprayed the boys orruks death guard green and will drybrush white then contrast them.  
 

I’ve got a whole load of khorne dudes to paint which have been sprayed white, as they’re all half naked it’s going to be lots of Guilliman flesh but I might get some Nazdreg yellow to try as gold instead of faffing round doing all the armour bits properly. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The great thing about that method is that if you want to apply any further highlights later you totally can. It's the whole basis of Juan Hidalgo's 'Eavy Contrast series (also a chap called Warhipster).

 

It's also of course, how GW recommend doing the capes on these guys:

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 06/04/2022 at 10:05, Captain Novaforce said:

Tempted to give this a go for whatever my next project is. I'm still working my way through my shame pile and want them to be consistent with what I've done so far

 

 

 

I like The Honest Wargamer a lot, I listen to their podcast all the time, and that method he's explaining is pretty good, but why is he trying to brand a technique that people have been using in miniature painting for many years, and in general art for centuries?  :lol:

 

There are some serious flaws to the way Rob is telling us how to do it. Firstly, and this is obvious from the finished model, if you just drybrush over everything to the same level, you end up with a very bland miniature, with every surface having the exact same level of contrast.  Look at the shots of what he ends up with. It looks fine, good even, and certainly good enough for a tournament, but every part of the model has the same level and volume. That's why it looks a bit washed out and pastel-y.

 

The way I do it is to prime black, and then spray grey generally from above to give more of a zenithal highlight. I then go in with a brush and add some highlights to the upper areas of the model with pure white.  That way you get more contrast, and you can also add texture as you're doing this.

 

A couple more things to mention - I don't generally think it's a great idea to use contrast paints on a wet palate as the water changes the properties of the paint. In short, it goes weird. Thinning the paint to use over a grey undercoat results in a look that is very much "thin paint over a grey undercoat." You need decent coverage, so that the areas of shade show through, but not so much the grey colour. Desaturated colours are great, but this ends up being something different.  Also, I'm not sure it stands up as a speed-painting technique, as while applying the paint takes no time, you do have to wait for each area to dry before moving on to the next. Anyone who has used contrast paints knows what happens when you put one contrast paint next to another one that is still wet. They mix together and ruin your model.

 

Here's another video on the technique for if you want to take it to the next level.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

After a couple of weeks of pushing to get a whole bunch of Escher painted, I played my first couple of games of Necromunda yesterday. It's waaaay more involved than Killteam (seemingly), and each game took 90-120 minutes, but we were also finding our way around it. 

 

****

 

First up was a game between 9 of my gangers vs 6 Van Saar (about 1250 credits on each side). My gangers had pretty standard kits - I hadn't realised I should dress them in armour or anything, while the Van Saar had jet bikes and laser shotguns and the like.

 

It didn't start well. I put my heavy stubber and a needle rifler atop of a sniper nest in deployment, but the former got immediately one shotted out of the game on the first go. I avenged this after one of the jet bikers came down the flank without realising my flamer could move across and set them on fire.

 

So she did that, which meant the jet biker was now a jet grill. Then I decided to try and kill them (because every serious injury other than Out Of Action is actually recoverable) by shooting them with poison darts from the sniper nest. It didn't kill them, but they did end up on fire AND poisoned.

 

This had the amusing outcome of actually being better for them than being on fire alone - as the poison meant they couldn't be activated, it also meant they didn't have to do an immediate "Blaze" hit check when activated and then fly around uncontrollably after that for every turn they were on fire. They just sat there, smouldering, with a poorly tummy instead.

 

Over on the other flank, another jet bike was being a prick but got itself surrounded. 4 gangers vs 1 jet bike, and could I kill it? Nope. I shot it point blank in the back with a meltagun but rolled ones, the tosser.

 

Eventually though, a couple of serious injuries and an out of action on his side lead to a failed bottle check, and then his entire gang bar the leader and the flaming jet biker fled the field, and they conceded.

 

****

 

Second game was my gangers vs...uh...my gangers. I had enough figures for two gangs and me and another wanted to play so we did. They brutally murdered me. The main lessons from this were that jumping down from platforms as a result of a failed nerve test when their mate's face just got melted off is A Bad Idea, and that the dice gods don't just hate me, they hate the fact I have ever existed.

 

****

 

Hopefully a few of us can get regular games going now we've popped out cherries. This was great fun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those are amazing. 
 

noon question, I’ve noticed that sometimes my paint is ‘tacky’. So around bases, and I’m just about to paint tyres but I’m not sure how to fix this sticky issue. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a really quality looking army @feltmonkeyI wish I had that level of army painting in me. I'd struggle to even assemble that many models let alone paint them. I noticed siege studios were promoting their ability to paint consistently over several years; I struggle to keep to a paint scheme from one day to the next 😅 I should work on my consistency, it really is the area where I weakest, but I don't have the time to dedicate to it. Even the army stuff I paint like infinity will often have a mix of characters and color schemes so it's more worthwhile having a flexible color system even if there's variation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, @Cocky and @MattKB :)

 

Yeah, painting armies consistently is an important part of painting for Siege, obviously.  Part of the job is making a comprehensive recipe list as you go along, for our own reference as much as anything.  I've only had one return customer so far, the white Ultramarine army with the blue shoulderpads, and I recently had to paint an extra squad for them, almost a year after the first part of the job.  Of course, not having an example of the model in front of me makes it tricky, but I had my recipe list and was able to replicate them.  This was a relief, because if you look at my Dark Angels army, you'd swear they weren't painted by the same person.  

 

I think sometimes you get jobs where a previous painter painted something, and has subsequently left, and we have to replicate the paintjob to match.  I'm not looking forward to that happening!  I don't really belong in the miniature painting company I keep, and the idea of trying to exactly replicate these more talented guys' work is daunting.  I'm in a whatsapp group with multiple Slayer Sword winners and Eavy Metal painters, ffs.  I live in fear of being found out.  :lol:

 

@MattKB I'm not sure I understand what you're saying about the paint becoming tacky.  Is it just when you're painting bases, or near bases?  What kind of paints do you use?  Could it be the basing materials?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, feltmonkey said:

 

 

I think sometimes you get jobs where a previous painter painted something, and has subsequently left, and we have to replicate the paintjob to match.  I'm not looking forward to that happening!  I don't really belong in the miniature painting company I keep, and the idea of trying to exactly replicate these more talented guys' work is daunting.  I'm in a whatsapp group with multiple Slayer Sword winners and Eavy Metal painters, ffs.  I live in fear of being found out.  :lol:

 

 

Mate, you firmly belong in such company. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.