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What can we do to save PC gaming?


LewieP
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I just checked the rules, and I didn't see anything about rules against linking to your own blog, as long as it's relevent, I hope this isn't against the rules...

I just wrote a blog post looking at the PC games industry, and what we as gamers, customers, and consumers can do to help prevent the doom and gloom predictions some people inside the industry have been making recently.

There has been a lot of talk recently about how PC gaming is 'dead', and that there is going to be an increasing shift away from big name games on PCs as publishers and developers seek higher revenue and profits from console markets. There is almost certainly some truth to this.

I, for one, love PC gaming, and would hate to see an industry in 10 years time with far less PC centric games like Realtime Strategies, Turn-Based strategies, First Person Shooters, Graphical Adventures and RPGs. Sure, lots of these games can be played on consoles, but there are a whole bunch of advantages that the PC platform provides.

As customers, we have several options. What kind of things can be done to improve the situation for PC gamers?

See the rest of the post here.

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I can see it being dead from a retail perspective, but gaming on a pc is still very much alive.

Edit: As for the talk recently of PC gaming being dead, well that's just Cliffy being arsey because no one bought his clone of the previous UT with prettier graphics and no decent game modes, plus no one bought gears PC because it's a buggy piece of shite that was thrown together with sticky tape and turds(plus I'd played the 360 version).

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save it? why? let it die...

Well...why would you want it to die, whether or not you enjoy PC gaming, surely you can see lots of other people do, and if PC gaming literally died tomorrow, and no more PC games were released, then the reduction in competition would increase prices and decrease innovation in console gaming too.

Don't spend time reading/writing blogs. Play a PC game instead!

I lol'd way more than I should have done, pretty poignant remark for me.

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If the traditional PC gaming industry wants me to buy its games, it should make them work properly on my perfectly reasonable PC. It really is as simple as that. I've got nothing against PC games besides that. There is no discussion to be had as far as I am concerned.

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I can see it being dead from a retail perspective, but gaming on a pc is still very much alive.

Yeah good point, buying & playing commerical games on the PC is dead in the water; but theres plenty of life in homebrew/emus/ports etc. but I don't even consider that side of things as "PC gaming" really

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Well...why would you want it to die, whether or not you enjoy PC gaming, surely you can see lots of other people do, and if PC gaming literally died tomorrow, and no more PC games were released, then the reduction in competition would increase prices and decrease innovation in console gaming too.

I lol'd way more than I should have done, pretty poignant remark for me.

1 - if lots of people enjoy it why is it dying?

2 - if it died tomorrow, there would be little or no impact on console gaming - console gaming isn't in competition with PC gaming. And a decrease in innovation? Hardly - we'd get less beardy RTS's and resource heavy FPS's. oh noes.

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1 - if lots of people enjoy it why is it dying?

Lots of reasons, I suggest you read the blog post I link at the top to see more of my thoughts on it.

2 - if it died tomorrow, there would be little or no impact on console gaming - console gaming isn't in competition with PC gaming. And a decrease in innovation? Hardly - we'd get less beardy RTS's and resource heavy FPS's. oh noes.

I don't know if you have read the full blog post, or what level of understanding of business you have, but honeslty, this is not the case. There is a great deal of overlap in the console/PC gaming industry, hell, a lot of individual games exist on both console and PC platforms. Removing a big chunk of the market moves the industry closer to a monopoly.

The closer to a monopoly any industry (without massive regulation) get, the more prices rise and the more stagnant products get, it's pretty basic economics.

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I don't know if you have read the full blog post, or what level of understanding of business you have, but honeslty, this is not the case. There is a great deal of overlap in the console/PC gaming industry, hell, a lot of individual games exist on both console and PC platforms. Removing a big chunk of the market moves the industry closer to a monopoly.

The closer to a monopoly any industry (without massive regulation) get, the more prices rise and the more stagnant products get, it's pretty basic economics.

I have a fair handle on 'pretty basic economics' and also a fair level of understanding of business, thanks very much.

If the PC market didn't exist - where would the designers / innovators from that market go to - the console market. The idea that the PC market in isolation is responsible for innovation isn't right - all that would happen is any innovation that surfaces initially in the PC market would shift to innovation in the console market.

I would be interested to see a rational argument that the collapse of the PC market would lead to price rises in the console market, given the differences in demographics between the 2 areas.

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The closer to a monopoly any industry (without massive regulation) get, the more prices rise and the more stagnant products get, it's pretty basic economics.

True but PC gaming isn't really in competition with console gaming anymore, purely because the PC gaming market is so small. And in terms of basic economics if PC gaming did die tomorrow console gaming wouldn't become a monopoly because there is still huge competition in the console gaming market between three massive companies.

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If the PC market didn't exist - where would the designers / innovators from that market go to - the console market. The idea that the PC market in isolation is responsible for innovation isn't right - all that would happen is any innovation that surfaces initially in the PC market would shift to innovation in the console market.

I honestly don't feel that is true. While consoles do seem to be making big improvements in the area I still don't feel that consoles would be anything without the PC to build upon. A risk taken in the PC industry is still a whole lot safer than a risk taken in consoles. For me, Orange Box was the biggest 'risk' in gaming last year. Without the PC it just wouldn't have existed.

Ultimately, PC gaming has been 'dying' on and off for the past 12 years. It will be dying again for the next 12. It's making the brave changes that it needs to, see Steam, Stardock, WoW etc... I think the issue we are talking about here is the presence of PC gaming within mainstream retail. Good fucking riddance to that I say. It's the past.

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The best thing a dev company could do is stop releasing buggy unreliable pieces of crap onto the market and expect PC gamers to love it. I'm not talking stuff incompatible with other things, I'm talking dev's not going through their god damn game and making sure it actually works the way it should if I shoot this or finish this mission.

Vampire the masquerade would have been brilliant if the damn thing worked the way it should. Another example is STALKER's encyclopaedia entries returning to an unread state for no apparent reason meaning you can't actually see what's new and what's not, that sort of trouble is endemic in PC gaming and to be honest it would make me warn someone off a game.

Edit: I do love steam though, not having a CD in the drive and not having to "fix" the .exe is a blessing.

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I just checked the rules, and I didn't see anything about rules against linking to your own blog, as long as it's relevent, I hope this isn't against the rules...

I just wrote a blog post looking at the PC games industry, and what we as gamers, customers, and consumers can do to help prevent the doom and gloom predictions some people inside the industry have been making recently.

See the rest of the post here.

PC gaming has been dying for about the last 10 years or so, it is hardly a new thing. And besides which - in the UK at least - it was second only to the Wii (IIRC) in terms of sales and/or market share at Game. Some of the strongest cards the PC market holds are the much-longer shelf-life a title can have, a far-better and robust budget market, greater range of genres and better avenues for digital distribution.

Chuck-in things like mods, ample other user-generated content and there is more than enough out there to keep gamers happy.

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I think PC gaming will be fine. My prediction is that the next wave of consoles will be home to more 'casual' games than anything else and, for the 'hardcore' gamers, the PC with GFW/Steam will be the next-gen platform of choice. The PC guys need to stamp out the piracy thing first though

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Yeah the problem is as mentioned in one of the links up there, that most games nowadays are designed with only the top PCs being able to run well. Why more companies dont attempt to make good games that will run on lower spec PCs I don't know. Things like WoW and The Sims fall into this catergory and are phenomenally successful. Whilst Crysis is probably a critical success, even my PC gaming friend with a pretty high spec who was raving about it can't play it on high settings so is waiting to upgrade. Does anyone know the sales figures Crysis got?

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If the traditional PC gaming industry wants me to buy its games, it should make them work properly on my perfectly reasonable PC.

This.

Releasing games that don't work on anyones computers isn't a very clever way to increase sales.

Steam's the best hope for PC gaming. GFW seems to be dying on its arse. Thye shouldn't complain too much though the Xbox brand gets most of the stuff that would previously have been PC-tastic.

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Does anyone know the sales figures Crysis got?

Over 1 million worldwide

So pretty well, and I imagine it will have legs, and continue to sell well over the next 6 months, never mind money they will make from licensing the engine.

So yeah, Crysis has been commercially successful, so it looks like high specification requirements alone won't stop individual games being successful.

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I For me, Orange Box was the biggest 'risk' in gaming last year. Without the PC it just wouldn't have existed.

I think you might need to explain that one? Surely the orange box was the LEAST Risky thing ever?

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So yeah, Crysis has been commercially successful, so it looks like high specification requirements alone won't stop individual games being successful.

It could have sold no copies and they'd still have made their money back from engine licenses.

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