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Bruce Everiss Vs Stuart Campbell


Swainy
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So, my plan worked.

Keeping the usual suspects venting their spleen on here has allowed intelligent, sensible people to build up a body of worthwhile comments on today's blog article.

Winner.

Bye bye. :o

And yet you keep linking to it in a desperate attempt to get us to read it.

You can fuck right off with your condescending bullshit.

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and then SeanR seconded a ban request for you. :o

What, for calling an idiot an idiot? And then for telling him to kill himself? On the internet? I think you need to relax, I mean you've even started talking in third person!!

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I think Brataccas was based on the theme of Bandersnatch.

Those large sprites would have only been possible on a 8 bit machine with our add on.

It took a 16 bit machine to implement it without.

Ah ok. So was the game going to play like that or it's just the futuristic theme which they only have in common? Just really curious as to what a supergame would have looked like.

I think Amiga(ish) quality games on a Spectrum may have sold massively.

Well, I guess they would have sold well, at the same price point. We'll never really know since there were no supergames released but what market research did Imagine do with regards to the demographic who would be willing to buy a £50 Spectrum game? It just seems out of whack with the trend at the time where the demographic of games buyers was much younger (And hence had less access to disposable income). Companies struggle to make a profit now with the same price point and the market is much bigger. Either your profit margin would have been huge or you would have needed so super-sales numbers. What was the plan behind it?

And obviously the value of the pirated games was many times the cost of the rents.

Why is this obvious? Again, serious question. Given the price point of games back then I'd imagine the profit on each sale was pretty small. You'd need a pretty large number of actual lost sales per week, for months, to make up the cost of the unused buildings and other costs.

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It's also worth pointing out that John Gibson (writer of Bandersnatch) gave an interview a few years ago saying that the game still wasn't complete at the time of liquidation, but they'd already filled the expansion ROM to its limits. So there would had to have been a few compromises to get it out even if Imagine had kept going...

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Ah, point taken. When your game doesn't sell and you're looking around for a reason then noticing that a load of people copied the game probably leads you to add two and two to get five.

You don't want to consider that it might be the product you have released.

Well, we've had several high profile PC games of late that have been critically lauded and sold terribly (even when previous games in the series/from the developer or console versions have done fine), so I think it's reasonable to make a correlation. Sometimes.

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Well, we've had several high profile PC games of late that have been critically lauded and sold terribly (even when previous games in the series/from the developer or console versions have done fine), so I think it's reasonable to make a correlation. Sometimes.

But there's also been a recession as of late and a slump in buying things across the board, and possibly a decline in PC gaming generally although I might just have imagined that. There are lots and lots of other correlations that make more plausible causes, I'd say. But this really is something that would need actual research to say anything reasonable about, I think.

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Completely off topic, but I keep on wanting to write something about Dark Sceptre.

KG

You know you should.

Could never get on with the game, but the clashing sword sound effect that alerted you to combat was lovely. As was all the technical gubbins, but I remember that one thing, most.

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So, my plan worked.

Keeping the usual suspects venting their spleen on here has allowed intelligent, sensible people to build up a body of worthwhile comments on today's blog article.

Winner.

Bye bye. :o

Oh noes! He tricked us all! How on earth will we live this down! Oh wait. Easily.

Every time Bruce has posted in this thread I've become more and more convinced that we're not talking to Bruce. I think we're talking to a 12 year old he's paid to post for him on the internets. It's the only thing that would explain why he still thinks acting like a teenage AOLer from 1998 picking a fight with someone smarter than him somehow makes him seem intelligent.

Or am I the only one hearing his posts in the style of Kevin the Teenager?

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Oh man this is special, I've been watching along since whenever Bruce spammed <another forum> with the article and not actually commented yet. Mainly because everyone else has said everything possible already.

The only thing I can think of to add is: Old people on the internet, lol.

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But there's also been a recession as of late and a slump in buying things across the board, and possibly a decline in PC gaming generally although I might just have imagined that. There are lots and lots of other correlations that make more plausible causes, I'd say. But this really is something that would need actual research to say anything reasonable about, I think.

I can't think of anything at the moment that's a bigger disincentive to PC developers than the fact that you can get any game for free with zero effort. There probably are other factors, but, well, that's a pretty big one in itself.

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I can't think of anything at the moment that's a bigger disincentive to PC developers than the fact that you can get any game for free with zero effort. There probably are other factors, but, well, that's a pretty big one in itself.

Psychologically, perhaps, yes. But whether that tranlates to a loss in sales for published games is an entirely seperate argument, surely? If anything that would mean published games should do better, as they have less competition due to other games not being made due to the perception that piracy would make doing so less than worthwhile.

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So let's get this straight.

Marketing man Bruce Everiss writes a blog that is not read by many people. By chance, he writes a revisionist history article one week that attracts the attention of the Reverend Stuart Campbell, who decides to take this revisionism to task. He does so very thoroughly. Due to the fact that people love a Rev Stu-fuelled flame war, Everiss' blog gets many more readers than he has ever seen before. Interest in the article and flame war dies out when Campbell stops posting. Everiss writes another article, and notices that this one has gone back to the usual small number of readers. Marketing-man Everiss then hatches on a plan to boost readership again, by flaming Campbell on fora where he can detect a sniff of interest in The Rev.

Have I got that right?

Mods: Bruceongames has insulted one of our members, Rev.Stu Campbell and should be banned. Similarly, Rev.Stu Campbell has insulted one of our members (Bruceongames) and should be banned. Cheers!

So, my plan worked.

Keeping the usual suspects venting their spleen on here has allowed intelligent, sensible people to build up a body of worthwhile comments on today's blog article.

Winner.

Bye bye. :o

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Bruce, if the crux of your argument - piracy damages the games industry, and is currently more rife than ever - is correct, then it must follow that the industry's best sales would have fallen between, say, 1993 and 1997, yes? That would be at the tail-end of 16-bit consoles (cartridge-based, and therefore practically impossible to pirate) and prior to both widespread PS1-copying and the advent of file-sharing on a mass scale. Therefore, the majority of games-players at that time would have had to legitimately buy their games, as there'd have been little option but to do so.

It pains me to apparently come to the defence of a madman, but that doesn't follow at all. Not least of course because the size of the market has increased substantially in the last 10/15 years.

It may well be true to say that the size of the 'pirate economy' relative to the size of the legitimate economy was at its lowest in the timeframe that you mention, but you're going to have to do the research on that one yourself.

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The blog article is quite interesting - not saying that because I think he is right, he's wrong, in my opinion, on some of the things he says once again but surely blogs are all about opinion in the first place? It's not like he's posting it up as "conclusive proof". Decent read though.

The popcorn got munched about 9.30 this morning, forget a fuel crisis, this thread has lead to a popcorn shortage!

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Hang on...

Did he really point out that GTA IV has been pirated in an effort to prove his contention that piracy stops games companies making money?

My god, he couldn't have undermined his own argument any more thoroughly.

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What, for calling an idiot an idiot? And then for telling him to kill himself? On the internet? I think you need to relax, I mean you've even started talking in third person!!

Yeah, you have read the rules, right?

Specifically the no abuse one, the part requesting that we be courteous to other members?

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