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Bruce Everiss Vs Stuart Campbell


Swainy
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I can only assume you had a magic copy, choddo. Stonkers crashed in every game - it was quite simply impossible to play.

Aha, from wikipedia

The game was plagued with bugs and early versions crashed after a few minutes of play. Despite this, it was awarded the title "Best Wargame" by CRASH in 1984 [1].

I must have had a later version, luckily

I'm playing it now, it's a nightmare scrolling the screen to where you want your units to go

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I wasnt aware i'd even typed the word "correctly", let alone misspelled it.... :)

In fairness, i wasnt the one bothered about punctuation, until duncan decided to be an arse and make a sarcy comment about my spelling...

Man, damn this forum for actually making me even care about something this stupid and trivial! :blink:

I wasn't making a comment about your spelling! I was just making a joke at angel's expense!

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I must have had a later version, luckily

I'm playing it now, it's a nightmare scrolling the screen to where you want your units to go

Oh man, I wish I'd have known that when I was twelve, or whatever. How does it bear up now apart from the scrolling? I'm tempted to give it a go on World Of Spectrum, but I've kind of banned myself from going there, as I always get my rosey memories shattered when revisiting Spectrum games

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Thanks for posting this - it's great reading!

The games industry has whined that “piracy is killing us” for the last 30 years. So how come it isn’t dead yet? How can it be that, in fact, it’s about 100 times the size, even though piracy is easier and more widespread than ever thanks to the internet and BitTorrent?

The answer is the same as it’s always been - if you make games that people want to buy, they’ll give you money. If you churn out crap and run your business badly, you’ll go bust. And Imagine was, by its own admission, thoroughly guilty on both counts. It’s embarrassing to see an industry figure so senior and supposedly wise still trying 25 years later to blame it all on little kids in playgrounds.

This.

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Oh man, I wish I'd have known that when I was twelve, or whatever. How does it bear up now apart from the scrolling? I'm tempted to give it a go on World Of Spectrum, but I've kind of banned myself from going there, as I always get my rosey memories shattered when revisiting Spectrum games

It's certainly been done better by StarCraft, probably best to leave it at that.

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Hi,

Stuart Campbell really took me by surprise.

I didn't even know who he was before this.

I write my articles. People can read them if they want.

Maybe comment if they have anything to add.

Stuart Campbell got into a relentless, agressive personal attack.

And he was consistently wrong. Just as he was over Lara Croft physics.

I am not a keyboard warrior. Whereas he is world champion at this discipline.

So I found it difficult lowering myself to his level.

Now I have written an article explaining piracy in some depth.

With lots of links to backing evidence.

Bruce

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One of Stuart's comments on my article was this:

Let’s have a look at how sales are doing when measured against ease of piracy:

FULL PRICE SOFTWARE BY FORMAT

————————————

360 (fairly easy to pirate) - 23.1%

Wii (quite hard to pirate) - 18.5%

PC (very very easy) - 17.1%

DS (very very easy) - 16.7%

PS3 (pretty hard) - 16.4%

PSP (definitely the hardest) - 4.2%

BUDGET PRICE BY FORMAT

—————————

DS (easy) - 30.6%

PC (easy) - 21%

Wii (medium) - 16.7%

PS2 (medium) - 12.3%

PSP (hard) - 7.3%

360 (hard) - 6.2%

Well, that’s odd. By and large, it’s the vastly-easiest-to-pirate DS and PC (requiring no hardware or firmware modifications whatsoever) that are selling the most games, and the much-more-difficult-to-pirate PSP (which requires all sorts of specialised peripherals and scary messing with the firmware) is trailing in last, miles behind everything else. How very strange.

This is just complete bollox. He even contradicts himself in it.

I am surprised the nobody pulled him up on it.

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Hi,

Stuart Campbell really took me by surprise.

I didn't even know who he was before this.

I write my articles. People can read them if they want.

Maybe comment if they have anything to add.

Stuart Campbell got into a relentless, agressive personal attack.

And he was consistently wrong. Just as he was over Lara Croft physics.

I am not a keyboard warrior. Whereas he is world champion at this discipline.

So I found it difficult lowering myself to his level.

Now I have written an article explaining piracy in some depth.

With lots of links to backing evidence.

Bruce

That's a beautiful piece of poetry, man.

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Stuart has his own forum for a handful of sycophantic acolytes. On it he deletes anything that doesn't make him look good.

Here is a complete load of lies and rubbish he posted on it:

It's only now that I've had a look at the actual article Bruce uses as the starting point for his blog post (the bandwidth on the site where it's hosted has been killed dead), and it's extraordinary. I've posted it here for everyone to see:

http://worldofstuart.excellentcontent.com/pics/bruce.jpg

It's an incredible tissue of total lies from start to finish - not entirely a surprise from a marketing man, whose job after all is to bullshit for a living, but a pretty odd thing to draw people's attention to now as some sort of evidence for a ropey "piracy was to blame" diatribe.

QUOTE

Bruce Everiss is... Imagine's operating director

Odd. Bruce would have us believe that he was a humble marketing man sat around helplessly while the directors recklessly ran the country into the ground, but "Operating Director" sounds a lot more involved.

I said in my original article that I was a director and repeated the point in many comments.

So this from Stuart is just an outright lie.

Or he didn't even read my article.

QUOTE

We've got three more titles on the way over the next month or so. Cosmic Cruiser's a space game and BC Bill's a cutie game about a prehistoric guy who lives in a cave and has to catch his food. The thing that both games have in common is very good graphics and sound.

Cunningly avoiding any mention of the gameplay, there. And let's take a moment to admire the "very good graphics" of Cosmic Cruiser:

QUOTE

So what's the best-seller on Spectrum?

Well, it's always the latest title. We've just brought out Pedro and it seems to be getting into some people's charts. Overall I think Arcadia is the biggest.

So is Pedro or Arcadia the biggest? Even in 1984, it was hard to nail Bruce down to the truth. And "seems to be getting into some people's charts"... wow, there's faint praise and there's faint.

So why were Imagine's great new games supposed to be reduced from £5.50 to £3.95, but then not?

Back then there were no real sales based charts. Just lists made up by the magazines.

Hence my comment.

As to the price decrease, that is explained correctly in my article.

QUOTE

We knew that dropping the price would increase sales, but what we hadn't bargained for was the industry reaction - which was universally unfavourable, from both the distributors and other software houses. The feeling was that if we did do it, it would upset the marketplace to such a degree that it would put many smaller software houses out of business.

It's got a lot to beat, but this surely gets the prize for the most gobsmackingly amazing thing Bruce has ever said. Imagine abandoned plans to cut their prices in order to keep their competitors in business? Wow.

On the megagames:

QUOTE

No-one's even seen them yet! [True enough about Psyclapse, of course.] They're so secret that most people at Imagine know nothing about them. Even the people who are working on the project only know sufficient to do their own piece of the work - we give them information on a 'need to know' basis.

We now know, of course, that according to Bruce EVERYONE at Imagine was working on the megagames, to the exclusion of everything else.

Why did the Marshall Cavendish deal collapse, eventually dragging the entire company down with it?

QUOTE

The idea was that each fortnight [input magazine] would have a game on it for several machines. But the original concept was that these should be average run-of-the-mill games. As we started developing the games, we put them out to be play-tested - which involves comparing them against the reviewer's favourite game. So the games were enhanced and enhanced and so on, so that in the end they became so good that it wasn't worth our while putting them through Marshall Cavendish.

Did you get that, folks? The reason the deal fell through was that despite their entire staff actually being devoted to the megagames, Imagine were at the same time knocking out multi-format games every two weeks that were TOO GOOD to be given to Marshall Cavendish in return for their £11m! (Though given that Pedro, Cosmic Cruiser and BC Bill are generally regarded as complete shit, these must have been some entirely different games that never got released. What a tragedy for the Spectrum market - don't suppose you've still got the master tapes, Bruce?)

I don't know where he got the idea that we received £11 million.

I think that it is a made up Stuart figure.

In those days that would be an absolute fortune, enough to run Imagine for several years.

The actual advance was iirc £200K, one 55th of what Stuart is claiming.

I'll leave some of the rest of the feature for you to discover for yourselves. Put a cushion on your desk before you start, so you don't bruise your jaw. Whenever you read anything that Bruce says, remember that we're dealing with a man who's spent the last 25 years as a professional liar.

So I have spent 25 years as a professional liar.

This is typical of his agressive personal attacks.

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The thing about this whole episode is that I was there throughout the life of Imagine.

I was a main board director.

I know the information we had, the discussions and the decisions.

I wrote the piracy letter to the press.

I came up with the megagame names Psyclapse and Bandersnatch.

Stuart never, ever even visited Imagine.

He was a schoolboy copying games at the time.

Yet he knows more about Imagine than I do.

This is patently absurd.

What we have is a Stuart world view where he is always right.

So his admitted 8 bit game piracy did no harm. It was victimless.

Whereas the reality is that it decimated game publishing.

Even Ultimate gave up because of it.

My new article goes through everything in a clear and logical way with links to lots of backing evidence.

But Stuart will still say that it is wrong.

That everyone else is wrong. Except him.

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I have heard that Stuart has been invited to CERN to throw the switch on the large hadron collider.

They considered Stephen Hawking but having read Stuart's expertise at Lara Croft physics they realised that his expertise was unparalelled.

In fact the reason why Stuart doesn't write very many articles isn't because he spends 99% of his life being a keyboard warrior.

It is because he has been working on theoretical physics.

The Campbell Boson is like the Higgs Boson but with less charm and sociopathic traits.

It really is a catharsis writing stuff like that about Stu.

I know how thousands of members of countless forums feel.

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Im gonna gra b popcorn on the way to work, with any luck Stu will have turned up by then.

Yeah, this is some Godzilla Vs Mothra shit right here...

Its like when neither party can fight their wars on their own forums, lets bring it on to rllmuk!

We're like Switzerand!

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Its not that intresting. Its old details no longer relevent....

Personally, I only liked Imagine because they had Galway doing some music and did Terra Cresta and G. Beret, which i DID buy but Ocean were far better. As were Elite.

its taken a turn to the depressing, and as RSC doesnt even post here (as himself), a turn for the pointless. the blokes a wind up merchant.

He can be persuaded sometimes.

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obviously RSC has his issues but he's already kicked this blokes entire credibility into a hat. a retread doesnt appeal, especially with someone incapable of acknowledging any opposing viewpoint. stu's mad as a balloon but bruce is just a mental case. read some of his articles to see how unhinged, out of touch and plain rude he is.

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Are you copying and pasting this onto all videogame forums?

No.

Who do you think I am? Stuart Campbell?

Unlike him I have a life.

One of my friends has a new hillclimb car I am looking at this morning.

So I am far too busy to waste too much time on the interweb.

I am here because lots of you guys visted my site.

And I like it when people visit my site because I write an article every weekday.

Started last August and there are 260 of them now.

Covering everything about games from the view of a publishing insider.

For instance this coming Friday I have written an article about what games of the future will be like.

I hope Stuart reads it.

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obviously RSC has his issues but he's already kicked this blokes entire credibility into a hat. a retread doesnt appeal, especially with someone incapable of acknowledging any opposing viewpoint. stu's mad as a balloon but bruce is just a mental case. read some of his articles to see how unhinged, out of touch and plain rude he is.

It is a pity this forum doesn't have those "thank you" buttons.

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