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Let The Right One In


lordcookie
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Whilst the relationship is most certainly doomed I think there is conflict between her need for a helper and her affection towards Oskar. I don't think she is quite as calculating as others here and whilst she is much older than her years she still has a child look curiosity (the way she plays with the Rubiks cube and reacts to the music Oskar plays in the apartment). Rather than just luring him in I think she is unsure of her feelings.

Yeah, until he starts growing stubble and losing that innocence she's initially drawn to. Then he's fucked, just like all the others who preceded him. Until the next one.

I do like the fact I'm being the most optimistic in this thread though as usually I'm called a cynical bastard.

Women, innit?

Dandelo is right. Let this be a lesson to you, young cookie: learn it now, or repent at your leisure later.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Perhaps there might be some mileage in

her feeling something for Oscar throughout their meeting, some twinges of what used to be what you'd feel with new love, but I didn't think personally that that was what was driving her. And I didn't think there was much that pointed towards her being changed by Oscar. I saw him being led through the whole film. He's a 12 year old boy, she'll mould him over time, was what I saw. That was the beautiful tragedy of it I thought. He found his amazing and unique love but it's utterly doomed and he doesn't know it.

You're being too hopeful I think.

lordcookie should get a warn for not being cynical enough. ;)

I liked the way they (deliberately?) left it fairly ambiguous as to Eli's true intentions for Oskar, in an American remake they'd probably have something like a flash-forward 50 years to spell it out for you. My personal feeling at the end of the film was definitely that Oskar would end up going the same way as the other guy who was helping her: grow too old to be useful and eventually be drained and discarded

Good film though anyway, even the missus who normally hates horror films seemed to quite enjoy it :(

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Jesus, they're appalling.

I was just thinking of ordering this as well, so I guess I should thank you for the timely intervention. This really has put me off - they're not just a little bit wrong, are they? They're more like the difference between the dubbed and subbed versions of Hard Boiled I saw when it was first released on VHS, and which told almost totally different stories (with one being more a comedy than an action flick).

If that disc isn't, or those scenes aren't, an aberration I'm going to have to steer clear of this one. Bugger!

EDIT: Hmm. I was just wondering there if this might account for lordcookie's different reading of the character relationships, especially as regards the cynical/romantic takes on the ending. Possibly, eh?

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Hmm, from reading that it looks like we might have to try to see this in the cinema anyway - assuming that is that the UK release gets the decent subtitles rather than the dodgy ones. Just from the few clips in that article there's a few things that make far more sense with the original subtitles than they did in the Bluray version.

"I'm trapped"

being one of them - felt like a very clunky line at the time.

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Those subtitles are shocking, the last "Eli" line especially, my god, why change a line that is the same in English anyway?

But yeah, watched this with a friend last night and we both thought it was cracking and were still talking about it when we woke up this morning. Really really good! One question though, what was the story with Oskar's dad? There was a really weird vibe when he was with him and that other bloke came in, think I missed something there.

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Saw the screener of this last night and loved it. God, those BR subs do look awful, and that's with me thinking the screener subs were already a little too over-americanised (unless Swedes do actually call a climbing frame a "Jungle Gym"?). One question though, is it still worth picking up the novel after having seen the film?

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Those subtitles are shocking, the last "Eli" line especially, my god, why change a line that is the same in English anyway?

But yeah, watched this with a friend last night and we both thought it was cracking and were still talking about it when we woke up this morning. Really really good! One question though, what was the story with Oskar's dad? There was a really weird vibe when he was with him and that other bloke came in, think I missed something there.

I thought his dad was gay and Oskar was uncomfortable when his boyfriend joined them.

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Those subtitles are shocking, the last "Eli" line especially, my god, why change a line that is the same in English anyway?

But yeah, watched this with a friend last night and we both thought it was cracking and were still talking about it when we woke up this morning. Really really good! One question though, what was the story with Oskar's dad? There was a really weird vibe when he was with him and that other bloke came in, think I missed something there.

Apparently it's a typical swedish thing where your buddy comes over you instanly break out the booze and everything else goes out the window. It does seem quite awkward but thats how a swedish feller explained it to me. He said the swedish people understood it fine but it seems that most people think that it's a awkward gay moment.
Saw the screener of this last night and loved it. God, those BR subs do look awful, and that's with me thinking the screener subs were already a little too over-americanised (unless Swedes do actually call a climbing frame a "Jungle Gym"?). One question though, is it still worth picking up the novel after having seen the film?
It is worth getting the book it's a good compliment to the film there are some subplots that were not used in the film and it goes into much more detail about hakan much more horror, the film focused on the relationship between eli and oskar and i think worked all the better for it but yeah i think is def worth a read.
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John Ajvide Lindqvist [the author and screewnwriter of Let the Right One In] has written a short story explicitly to counter a reading of book and film which assumes Oskar will grow up to replace Hakan as Eli's beard and procurer- insisting instead that she (the pronoun is unavoidable, despite her "Would you still love me if I weren't a girl?") will turn Oskar into a vampire to preserve their magical, presexual union.
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I think the version that the author acknowledges is the director's vision is more interesting. And obviously, it seems to be one that's implied deliberately by the filmmaker. He seems to accept that even his novel (which I've not read) is a little open ended as regards the fate of Oskar and the nature of the vampire's relationships, hence his post hoc writing of this short story to affect the possible readings of the ending (which I have to say, I find a bit odd really. He's an artist, not a draftsman tightening up a piece of legislation after it's shown to be ambiguous in order to leave less room for interpretation. But still...)

From AIC last October:

The Northlander: A couple of years ago, I got hold of the first version of the screenplay.

JAL: Okay? What, the really long one, the two-parter?

The Northlander: The two-parter, exactly.

JAL: 250 pages or something.

The Northlander: I read it before I read the book, and I read the book immediately after.

JAL: Okay.

The Northlander: ...and what occured to me was that this whole thing with Håkan, Håkan’s background and everything, it was removed even in the first version.

JAL: Very early on, yeah.

The Northlander: My first thought back then was, that you don’t know anything about him. It could be, that he’s been with Eli since he was very little.

JAL: ...and that’s almost implied in the film. The movie ends so that you almost believe that Oskar becomes a new Håkan.

The Northlander: Yeah so that was intended?

JAL: I think that Tomas deliberately left that open. But I know a lot of people recieve it as now Eli has gotten herself a new helper that’s going to follow [her]. That is NOT my version of the end. I’ve written a short epilogue to the epilogue, that is like my version which will come out in a few years. But it’s just 5-6 pages. Until then, Tomas version will reign. It’s a really good ending to the movie. It’s perfect. But it’s a different version from mine. It’s in the book a little bit, Eli picks up Håkan from the gutter when he’s grown up and filthy already.

The Northlander: But yet there are implications in the book, I feel, that you don’t really know if Eli is quite what she says she is, that maybe she... Maybe she’s using Oskar or maybe she isn’t. You don’t really know.

JAL: No. And that’s pretty good. I think it’s pretty good that it’s open like that. But right now, there is so much going on around the book... I like the open ending in the novel. But I would still at some point like to give it my much happier ending.

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So definately a she then?.

In Kermode's S&S feature, he talks about transgenderism which he says was a feature of the novel being largely removed from the film, so I imagine it's more to the fore in the book, which I've not read. My own interpretation of the film was the (androgynous) girl vampire was referring to her vampirism rather than her gender when she said "Would you still love me if I weren't a girl?"

Kim Newman's piece said that the novel contains a lot of backstory "including Eli's medieval origins and unsexing". Whatever that means.

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In Kermode's S&S feature, he talks about transgenderism which he says was a feature of the novel being largely removed from the film, so I imagine it's more to the fore in the book, which I've not read. My own interpretation of the film was the (androgynous) girl vampire was referring to her vampirism rather than her gender when she said "Would you still love me if I weren't a girl?"

Kim Newman's piece said that the novel contains a lot of backstory "including Eli's medieval origins and unsexing". Whatever that means.

In the book Eli is a castrated boy. It even describes the castration when Oskar gets to 're-live' events from Eli's past when they kiss. Oskar starts out assuming Eli's a girl though. In the film you get a short glimpse of the scar, so it's the same I guess.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Wow. The whole transgender thing completely passed me by. I took the whole 'not a girl' 'can't be friend' and deep voice to be vampire based, not male. Plus the muff shot was a 'oh my god I've seen a girls bits' type thing - with the dark stuff being pubescent hair - not a scar.

So yeah. I was paying full attention and everything. Maybe they could have just held the shot a little longer. Or had Oscar comment on the scar in some way. It's a pity, because it really would have given everything that followed an even more odd slant.

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I think he was an alcoholic and his mate probably just makes him worse/ignore Oskar.

This was definitely my interpretation, rather than his dad being gay. I assumed that the alcoholism was the main reason that Oskar lived with his mum.

Saw this at the cinema on Saturday. There were only about 10 people in the cinema (at Leicester Square!) and two people walked out after about twenty minutes, but I thought this was a stunningly thought-provoking film, which was extremely difficult to categorise into a single genre. The orchestral score and the snow-covered scenes of Stockholm worked together to great effect. Visually there were some superb moments, several of which having already been mentioned in this thread, and as a whole the movie was everything that I hoped it would be. And having been to Stockholm several times, it's quite interesting to see those suburban blocks of houses in a different light... :unsure:

Absolutely recommend.

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I saw this last night, it was excellent. Reminded me of anime for some reason, Elfin Lied springs to mind, in a good way. I think I'll get this on dvd when it comes out.

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Just been looking at places to see this in Leeds / Bradford and the only place I can find is the Vue in The Light, but in the search film dropdown there's two entries for the film, one normal and one tagged ST (subtitles) that's only listed as showing in Watford. Does that mean the rest of them will definitely be a dub? And if so, it it any good?

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I saw this last night and it's undoubtedly quirky and interesting. I woke up this morning and immediatedly thought about the film and this is surely a good sign. I've saw it advertised as 'the best horror in years' and that's certainly not an ideal tagline. Still, it's well worth viewing and I fail to see what the apparent remake will bring to the table.

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