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Let The Right One In


lordcookie
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I finally watched this last night and thought it was pretty shit all in all. Yeah, the cinematography was nice, the ambiguity of their relationship (and realising that the old dude probably met her when he was 12 too) and some of the acting wasn't too bad, but overall it was just boring. I was waiting for something to happen, but it never really did.

Why's it had so much praise? I just can't see anything that good about it.

Just looking back up the page, who decided she was a boy? I never got that from the film at all, just she didn't want them getting close because she was a vampire.

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Did you fall asleep?

I wish I had gone to bed instead of bothering, to be honest.

So, why all the praise? Everything I've read, everyone I've spoken to have been raving about it, but it did nothing for me.

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Just looking back up the page, who decided she was a boy? I never got that from the film at all, just she didn't want them getting close because she was a vampire.

I've yet to read the book, but someone who has read it told me that there was no reference to Eli being a boy.

As an aside to this, the same writer's new book "Handling the Undead" is superb.

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I was waiting for something to happen, but it never really did.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1139797/synopsis

If I'd had a few weeks like that, I'd say they were pretty eventful really. The bit with the cats alone would make it a fairly memorable year.

Unless you mean you didn't like the denouement. I thought it was quite nicely resolved without resorting to banal convention - and, as others have said, a large part of the appeal is in its ambiguity - but if you didn't like it, fair enough. However, it's not true to say that nothing really happens.

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The vampire asks if it can come in when it's at the window at the start of that earlier scene, and makes it clear that an invite has to be made. Oskar then gives his express permission.

So, (1) I just missed that? And (2) it is one entry per invite, not one invite equals permanent access? Hmm. Not sure I like that take on it. Guess I need to watch it again. Darn...

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http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1139797/synopsis

If I'd had a few weeks like that, I'd say they were pretty eventful really. The bit with the cats alone would make it a fairly memorable year.

Unless you mean you didn't like the denouement. I thought it was quite nicely resolved without resorting to banal convention - and, as others have said, a large part of the appeal is in its ambiguity - but if you didn't like it, fair enough. However, it's not true to say that nothing really happens.

You know what I mean, of course something happened, I wasn't watching a blank screen for two hours. I suppose what I meant was that I found it boring and the pace seemed way off. I know in my first post I said it was shit all in all, but that doesn't mean I hated it. I just didn't find it entertaining. I can imagine the book's decent enough, as there was definitely something good trying to get out.

I didn't particularly mind the ending either. It tied up dverythi g and reinforced what I thought about Hakan, so it did its job.

I just don't get the praise and I'd love to hear why people like it so much. I'm genuinely intrigued.

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I've yet to read the book, but someone who has read it told me that there was no reference to Eli being a boy.

As an aside to this, the same writer's new book "Handling the Undead" is superb.

As said above, the book is

utterly explicit in explaining that Elijah is a boy before becoming Eli

. And I completely agree about Handling the Undead. It's as if Lindqvist wrote a book to suit the melancholic mood of the film of Let the Right One In, rather than the brilliant but schlocky original. Really enjoyed it and would fully recommend it to those in here who enjoyed the film.

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Is there a dedicated thread for the remake? I did a quick search but couldn't find anything.

From Comingsoon.net

Kodi Smit-McPhee, Chloe Moretz and Oscar-nominee Richard Jenkins will headline the cast of Let Me In, Matt Reeves' adaptation of Let the Right One In, when principal photography begins this fall in New Mexico. The announcement was made today by Hammer Films Co-CEO's Simon Oakes and Nigel Sinclair, as well as Overture Films CEO Chris McGurk and COO Danny Rosett.

Director Reeves (Cloverfield) has cast Smit-McPhee (The Road) and Moretz ((500) Days of Summer) in the two lead adolescent roles of Owen and Abby for the eagerly awaited horror feature. Jenkins will play the lead adult character known as Hakan in the original film.

Based on the bestselling Swedish novel, "Lat den Ratte Komma In," by Swedish author John Ajvide Lindqvist, Let Me In is a contemporary vampire tale about a young boy who befriends a girl new to his neighborhood. The film is a remake of the highly acclaimed Swedish film, Lat den Ratte Komma In, also known as, Let the Right One In.

Hammer acquired the remake rights to Let the Right One In at the 2008 Tribeca Film Festival where the film took home the Founders Award® for Best Narrative Feature, and has fast-tracked the film for a November 2009 start date. The film is a Hammer Films production with a projected 2010 release in the U.S. by Overture Films. Exclusive Film Distribution is handling worldwide sales and distribution of the film.

Producing the film are Hammer's Simon Oakes, Guy East and Nigel Sinclair and Oscar®-winner Donna Gigliotti. Hammer's Alex Brunner and Tobin Armbrust will executive produce along with John Ptak, Philip Elway and Fredrik Malmberg. Overture's Robert Kessel, EVP Production & Acquisitions, will oversee production for the studio. Swedish producers John Nordling and Carl Molinder, who produced the original film, are also involved as producers on this remake.

The Australian-born Smit-McPhee, 13, stars alongside Viggo Mortensen in The Road, a film festival favorite due out in November. He previously earned the AFI Young Actor's Award® in 2007 for his role in Romulus, My Father.

Moretz, 12, will star in the much–talked-about Kick-Ass next spring and previously appeared in (500) Days of Summer and The Amityville Horror. She has been nominated each of the past three years for a Young Artist Award®.

Jenkins first worked with Overture on The Visitor, for which he earned a Best Actor Oscar nomination last year. His recent work includes Burn After Reading, Step Brothers and television's "Six Feet Under." He is due to star in several upcoming projects including the much-anticipated The Cabin in the Woods, Dear John and Eat, Pray, Love.

It was announced last year that Reeves will write and direct Let Me In. In addition to the box office hit Cloverfield, Reeves' directing credits include the comedy The Pallbearer, starring David Schwimmer and Gwyneth Paltrow, and the hit television show "Felicity," starring Keri Russell, which he co-created and executive produced along with partner J.J. Abrams.

"Kodi, Chloe, and Richard are my absolute dream cast," says Reeves. "I couldn't be more excited to be working with them."

Let Me In is the first film in a two-picture co-production, financing and distribution agreement between Overture Films and Exclusive Media Group, the parent company of Hammer Films and Spitfire Pictures.

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  • 1 month later...

Just watched this last night, and I loved it. It's so refreshing to have a film that doesn't hold your hand all the way through, and leaves you to discover things yourself.

Though I can't believe it took me until the end to figure out that

Oskar is just repeating the cycle. It wasn't until the end that I recalled the little things like how Other Dude asked her to stop seeing Oskar.

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Just watched this last night, and I loved it. It's so refreshing to have a film that doesn't hold your hand all the way through, and leaves you to discover things yourself.

Though I can't believe it took me until the end to figure out that

Oskar is just repeating the cycle. It wasn't until the end that I recalled the little things like how Other Dude asked her to stop seeing Oskar.

Did you really figure it out thought?

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For the purposes of the film, yes.

Not really, i don't think it's quite that black and white, thats what i love about this film. You can see things in different ways, but how is

Oskar supposed to do the things for Eli that Hakan could, afterall he is only a child himself, is he going to go out and kill for her (it showed that he didn't have it in him to kill) provide shelter for the two of them?

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It can definitely be interpreted in different ways (and you're right, that's part of the beauty of the film), but the only way you can say that faf's interpretation isn't valid is if you start citing things from the book that aren't relevant in the story as presented in the film. That's all!

I agree, i suppose it is driven more to the conclusion that faf came to, i can't really argue that. I love films that make you think long after you've watched them.

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  • 3 months later...

Very late to the party but saw this last night and loved it. One of the most beautifully shot films I've seen in a long time.

As regards the ending, I read the thread and I had also considered that this was not a happy ending i.e. Oskar would now be taking the place of Hakan. Whilst this is of course totally open to interpretation, in one of the special features on the DVD the director states that he doesn't see it that way. He sees it as a happy ending...this may of course be simply politics given his comments may well have come after the author's attempt to clear up any ambiguity. Personally, I love the fact that it's up for grabs.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

Watched this last night, and I liked how it was shot and how the 'horror' aspect was treated. However, having only just read the book, the turn of events in that were too fresh in my mind to appreciate the film's adaptation as much, insofar as the pacing seemed quite off with what I was expecting. That's my fault, I reckon, because a lot of the branching storylines in the book were clearly not suitable for the film's particular adaptation.

In fact, the one thing that really wasn't handled well (unliked the Oskar-Eli relationship) was

Oskar's bullying. In the book there's a very clear build up to the end scene in the pool, with the bullying being a lot more severe and frequent and Oskar's fighting back getting more drastic. In the film Oskar hits Jonny over the ear and suddenly they want to murder him for it - nothing in between.

I think that was a little drastic.

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  • 4 years later...

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