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Wow, disappointed with your critique there. I absolutely loved it and thought it stood way up there with shivers and videodrome. Sure its simpler and less ambitious but I loved the way it hinted at a world I knew nothing about with its mysterious hand gestures, tattoos and untranslated spoken russian. I thought Naomi watts was brilliant as the righteous but dowdy heroine and I was fully committed to the emotional journey that Viggo's character went on. I really loved it.

:lol:

You made the same mistake Shoes and me did when we watched it a while ago. One of the subtitle options on the DVD/rip translates the Russian. You're supposed to understand it all; a lot of it is critical to the plot.

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:(

You made the same mistake Shoes and me did when we watched it a while ago. One of the subtitle options on the DVD/rip translates the Russian. You're supposed to understand it all; a lot of it is critical to the plot.

Erm, but I saw it at the cinema dude :lol:

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I was going to watch a few minutes of Annie Hall on Sky before the football started yesterday but ended up watching it all. Man, when Woody Allen was good he was untouchable. It’s definitely in my top 3 Woody Allen films. I’ve seen Scoop and Match Point and thought they were dreadful. I haven’t taken a chance on Cassendras Dream, it only lasted about a week in the cinema here. Has anyone here seen it? It got some fairly painful reviews.

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I saw it first at the cinema too. The Russian dialogue was fully subbed.

I saw it at the cinema twice. once at a multimedia and once in the Odeon Camden town. both times it was about 90% subbed. All the main dialogue was subbed, but some of the biting comments between the ncle and viggo, and between the father and son were not.

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Watched Dead Man's Shoes last night. Not as hard hitting as it should have been, but the final third was mostly brilliant. It's hard to talk about it without spoiling it.

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Sunday - Watched Police Academy on DVD - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087928/

Still funny film, and it is about a group of rejects joining Police Academy in New York after change of policy from Mayor.

Cadet Carey Mahoney was good character as rebel, Lt Harris was funny daft and pathetic.

Hightower was a florist now a very tall cop.

You also see young Kim Cattrall (Samantha in Sex in the City) in it, and beautiful Sgt. Debbie Callahan who is your ideal PE Teacher (Leslie Easterbrook) (I wonder if she related to Dirty Harry Callahan) :lol:

There is lot of pranks and light heart comedy.

Recommended, but it probably a bit out of date comedy but who care. DVD is ok for picture quality.

Tonight I watched Blades of Glory on HD DVD - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0445934/

It is about 2 male figure staking got banned after a massive punch up in front of crowd, then they team up after 3.5 years to do figure staking pair with two male. Will Ferrell done his role very well, but he seem to be too big and old for the role. His (Chazz) role was bad boy rock star type. The other guy Jon Heder (Jimmy) did very well and he is artist type with lot of grace. They have to compete with evil brother and sister pair. the other sister Katie fall in love with Jimmy. Jenna Fischer is not bad looking (Katie) and she look like a young Abby in ER.

Excellent picture and sound. Film is fun to watch but felt it is 10 minutes too short. I like the film, but it is not a masterpiece.

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Police Academy's great and all but Police Academy 2 is where the real action is.

I never thought I'd see a modern-day appraisal of Police Academy, let alone one so positive.

Hightower was a florist now a very tall cop.

This needs to be part of a song.

Hightower was a florist now a very tall cop.

Officer Hooks had to learn to shout "STOP!"

Lieutenant Harris had a dance at the Blue Oyster Bar

And Hightower ripped the door off a car

Monsignor Larvelle Jones made a roar from a cough

And Tackleberry scored and then his gun went off

Mahoney played a trick with Harris' shampoo

Reached through the window and replaced it with glue!

Fackler was the clumsy one, Clouseau's equal

There was no Bobcat Wilder though, he was in the sequel

There were johnsons as far as the eye could see

These are my memories of Police Academeeeeeeey.

  • Upvote 4

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Brilliant, Rowan Morrison, BRILLIANT. :lol:

Saw Once Upon A Time In The West yesterday. It was especially gripping in the first halve hour, almost perfect film making. I also enjoyed the rest of the film, each scene was brilliantly shot and the soundtrack was phenomenal, but the pacing and structure didn't quite match it. It was more a collection of beautiful scenes than something that really worked as a whole, but it is easily forgiven. :( I always thought I was going to love westerns and this certainly proved me right.

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Tonight I watched

HOME OF THE BRAVE on Blu Ray - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0763840/

I just bought this film to watch as I like Jessica Biel.

The film was about 3 soldier and a surgeon who return from Iraq to Spokane in USA (No idea where)

One was injured as she lost her hand. Other got injury on his leg but heal ok, and a troubled mind soldier after shooting down an innocent lady, and a surgeon who have a nightmare after finishing 12 hours shift to deal with a crisis with several death and several limbs severed from other soldiers (losing arm/leg)

This is film which follow their lives on return to Spokane. It is not a happy or fun film to watch due to seriousness of dealing life after war.

Samuel Jackson done well as a surgeon, and lovely Jessica Biel did well on her role dealing with losing her hand. She is a young mom who got divorced and had a child and lost her hand. There is one funny moment in the bedroom when undressing.

The film is 3 star out of 5 for me. Blu Ray disc is good picture and sound, but extra is very thin as there is 3 advertising trailers, and a commentary that all. I would rent the film if I were you.

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M. Night Shyamalan's new movie, The Happening.

This guy had one great movie in him (Sixth Sense) and a couple of good ideas (Unbreakable, Signs). The lack of a twist ending really shows up what a boring storyteller Shyamalan is. About thirty minutes into the movie, someone suggests a theory that's accepted by Mark Wahlberg (high school science teacher, and apparently the smartest man on the East Coast) and is thus correct. For the next hour-and-something you'll watch Marky Mark and his boring wife run away from the wind. Seriously.

Absolute rubbish. Even the early scenes before it's obvious what the threat is are boring. How do you make mass suicide in the middle of New York this boring, Shyamalan? How do you do that! In summary: boring.

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I went to see Jules et Jim this afternoon. It’s the story of 2 friends, one French and one Austrian, and the way their friendship is affected when they meet a girl. I didn’t know much about it before I went to see it other that that it was one of the famous films from the French new wave.

I really enjoyed it. It was funny and quite sad in places. The friends are very different to each other, Jim is outgoing and confident while Jules is more introspected. Jules meets Catherine an outgoing, free-spirit and promptly falls for her. He knows his friend is going to dig her and at one point he asks him not to take her from him. 1914 rolls around and the friends head off to war, fighting on opposite sides. They both survive and when they return Jules and Catherine leave Paris and set up home in the French country side. When Jim comes to stay the love triangle tensions kick right in.

It’s very well acted and directed. There’s loads of interesting camera work and editing techniques, zooms and freeze frames and that. The characters are very well written but I just wanted Jules to man up and fight for his woman and to stop letting people push him around. I think it’s on some kind of limited release and is definitely worth taking in at the pictures.

I also watched In Bruges which was excellent , The Bank Job which was instantly forgettable and Marathon Man which I’d never seen before and it was fantastic. Dustin Hoffman was superb and the famous torture scene was as horrible as I was expecting. Sky have been showing a season of 1970s movies, a lot of them have been conspiracy theory themed films; Marathon Man, The Conversation, All the President's Men etc and I’ve enjoyed them all. I remember a thread on here ages ago where someone suggested the best ever decade for films was the 70’s and from the few I watched last week I can dig that.

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The BFI has restored many of David Lean's films. Rather than Brief Encounter or Great Expectations I was keen to see "The Passionate Friends", as David Thomson in his Biographical Dictionary of Film (which has been my bible for the last couple of months) thought it was most worthy of re-discovery. He much preferred his earlier films, as he felt his later epics like Lawrence of Arabia or Dr Zhivago were epic, but empty of ideas.

The film was a love triangle (or is that a love rectangle, I forget?). For reasons that I don't entirely understand Anne Todd decided not to marry her true love Trevor Howard. She said something to the effect that she didn't want to belong to anyone, she wanted to belong to herself. He retorted then her life would be a failure. Instead she ends up with a rich banker who she doesn't love, played by Claude Rains, who was excellent. As her life falls apart towards the end of the movie there was a remarkable moment on a tube platform.

Almost in an ecstasy, she tries to leap in front of a train, only to be caught in her husband's arms.

And it was another movie about divorce! They were obsessed back then.

Another thing I've noticed that I love about black and white films: a shining tear, brightly lit, welling in a woman's eye. Both in this movie, and in Claudette Colbert's eye in It Happened One Night. Beautiful.

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Well, let's see. The most recent film I absolutely loved was No Country for Old Men and I'm a big fan of the works of Kim Ki-Duk, David Lynch and Charlie Kaufman. I hope you can do something with this list, the must be enough hidden gems to be found.

Bizarrely enough, bizarrely enough one of the reccomendations I'm about to give you can be found in this very thread,.

The Seventh Seal, which Graham_S already reccomended, is extremely close to No Country for Old Men thematically. I'm a whisker away from writing an essay comparing their interpretations of chance and death within cinema as a form of exam procastination. They also use the device of two different characters showing two contrasting views on death, although this is much stronger in No Country for Old Men and only really applies to my interpretation of it. Someone posted once (it was probably Graham) about similarities between the dialogue Chigurh from NCFOM and Death from The Seventh Seal. Although they're thematically extremely similar and so result in much of the same dialogue, I doubt this was intended given the faith of NCFOM to the novel it is based on. Hence I see it as drawing on the same sources rather than any kind of homage. Anyway.

Rear Window strikes me as a very strong inspiration for a crucial element of one of No Country for Old Men's cinematic techniques - showing something through a characters eyes, then showing that characters facial reaction to it. It's also a great film that hasn't aged much.

I can't strictly reccomend any past Coen films because I haven't seen any others! But from what I've read, a few of their other films use similar devices and ideas.

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I appreciate that the paradox that I perceive to be a deliberate part of Vertigo's structure probably isn't enough to dispel your doubts about the rather convenient and artificial way in which the film's plot proceeds, so I'll concede that the qualities of Hitchcock's narrative - that is to say the manner in which the plot of Vertigo is told - doesn't include a strict respect for the natural viability of its story; I only differ from you in that I don't perceive that as a problem, but as a virtue. Still, each to their own; I'd advise you, though, to give a wide berth to Marnie if you're unwilling to forgive Hitchcock for trespassing into altered states of consciousness and the border between sanity and madness!

In summary, for Beitel to appreciate Vertigo he needs to watch it like he'd watch a Lynch film?

And to be honest, Vertigo donates more than a little to Mulholland Dr.!

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Bizarrely enough, bizarrely enough one of the reccomendations I'm about to give you can be found in this very thread,.

The Seventh Seal, which Graham_S already reccomended, is extremely close to No Country for Old Men thematically...

Rear Window strikes me as a...

I can't strictly reccomend any past Coen films because I haven't seen any others! But from what I've read, a few of their other films use similar devices and ideas.

I've seen The Seventh Seal (the local cinema will show a lot of his films in the following months by the way, so I can see some of his other works) and I can see the similarities, but the reason I love No Country is because of the way it is filmed. The closest I've seen so far are the opening scenes from Once Upon A Time In The West: so incredible subtle and powerful, but then stretched for the rest of the movie. Rear Window sounds more like that, but I haven't watched it yet since both Vertigo and Psycho haven't really aged that great. But I'm not going into a discussion about those films again before I've given them another viewing and I think I've explained myself quite enough so far.

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In summary, for Beitel to appreciate Vertigo he needs to watch it like he'd watch a Lynch film?

And to be honest, Vertigo donates more than a little to Mulholland Dr.!

I've said the same thing myself about Lynch and Hitchcock (indeed, I recall that, in another place known to us both, I marked out Shadow of a Doubt as a Lynch before Lynch, along with Secret Beyond the Door and The Lady from Shanghai, IIRC). Still, talk of viewing Vertigo whilst in a Lynchian frame of mind begs the question of what that would be, with The Straight Story at one extreme and Inland Empire at the other (with Twin Peaks spread along the breadth of that range) - strong connections between all of them, certainly, but it's a compliment to Lynch that he has brought forth such diversity). I cannot help but feel that it is somewhat counterproductive to analyse works as rich, distinguished and individual as Hitchcock's through those of another (notable and idiosyncratic) filmmaker, but if I were pushed I'd say that Vertigo rests just in the balance between realism and expressionism, and so Blue Velvet would be the corresponding film in Lynch's oeuvre. (Although I am discounting some of the more subjective flourishes in Vertigo, which might well shift it slightly closer toward the IE end of the spectrum.) Putting to one side what I've just said, however, Lynch, as a contemporaneous filmmaker, is a timely reminder of what fictional films at their very highest reach can be, ecstatic visions which, however nightmarish or grotesque, captivate the viewer,* making them glad witnesses, happy to swear that all the lies and absurdities they've witnessed are perfectly true; so, if a Lynchian frame of reference were to imbue the work of Hitchcock, or any other director, with sufficient intrigue to overturn a previously held antipathy toward them, I'd say I was all for 'counterproductive' analyses.

Oh, and whilst I'm making reference to mutually acknowledged threads, have you made any progress towards seeing Andrei Rublev? Your reiterated admiration for The Seventh Seal reminds me that you'd probably get a great deal from Tarkovsky's epic, another period allegory.

*Though I am discounting, for the sake of my gushing, those directors who use distancing techniques so as to nurture consciousness of a viewer's status as a foreign observer (Pasolini, Akerman, Haneke, et al.)

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The BFI has restored many of David Lean's films. Rather than Brief Encounter or Great Expectations I was keen to see "The Passionate Friends", as David Thomson in his Biographical Dictionary of Film (which has been my bible for the last couple of months) thought it was most worthy of re-discovery. He much preferred his earlier films, as he felt his later epics like Lawrence of Arabia or Dr Zhivago were epic, but empty of ideas.

The film was a love triangle (or is that a love rectangle, I forget?). For reasons that I don't entirely understand Anne Todd decided not to marry her true love Trevor Howard. She said something to the effect that she didn't want to belong to anyone, she wanted to belong to herself. He retorted then her life would be a failure. Instead she ends up with a rich banker who she doesn't love, played by Claude Rains, who was excellent. As her life falls apart towards the end of the movie there was a remarkable moment on a tube platform.

Almost in an ecstasy, she tries to leap in front of a train, only to be caught in her husband's arms.

And it was another movie about divorce! They were obsessed back then.

Another thing I've noticed that I love about black and white films: a shining tear, brightly lit, welling in a woman's eye. Both in this movie, and in Claudette Colbert's eye in It Happened One Night. Beautiful.

I liked you noticing this shining tear, it's very true and very beautiful in both films

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This morning I watched

Music and Lyrics - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0758766/ on HD DVD (Bought it for 4.99)

Basically it is a romance comedy film with Hugh Grant and Drew Barrymore.

Hugh played as Alex who is a 80s has been musician who have a talent for writing music, but not words. He was asked by a latest Teen star to write a song with those words in it and was given a few days to do it. He met Sophie (Drew) who came to water the plant in his apartment and was discovered by Alex for her talent in lyrics. Then the usual romance relationship blossom and overcome difficulty.

The music is fine and the girl who sing as Cora made me laugh.

The film is fine and worth the money, and it is a bit different role for Hugh Grant. (When is he going to do a action film or sci fi :ph34r:) Drew Barrymore is still lovely. The film is fun to watch unlike some romantic comedy. If you like Hugh Grant films, you will like it. 4 stars out 5

HD DVD disc is fine and excellent picture and sound.

I also watch Ratatouille on Blu Ray this afternoon - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0382932/

This is first animation film I have seen on HD DVD or Blu Ray.

Basically it is about Remy the rat-chef who discovered his talent and passion for fine food and cooking. He got lost in Paris sewage by taking wrong turn.

He met his human protégé, Linguini who had no talent and his late father was a legendary chef who own the restaurant which is top one in Paris. Linguini was given a job at the restaurant to annoyance of head chef. Then there is lot of stuff happening including a new relationship between Colette and Linguini.

It is a wonderful animation film and story. The Blu Ray disc is very good as well. I think it is 2nd best animation from Pixar as The Incredibles get the vote for best one. It is an original film.

5 stars out of 5.

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La Dolce Vita. My second Fellini after the brilliant Otto E Mezzo. This one doesn't reach the same heights but is definitely worthy of anyone's time. The film mirrors it's main character: it's almost three hours filled with parties and a bit of real life once in a while without really fleshing it out. But you get that with a character that tries to hide from his doubts and problems by going from one party to another. Marcello Mastroianni is always watch able, one of the most charismatic actors of all time.

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Charlie Wilson's War

I'm still in two minds about this film. Whilst an enjoyable film it does feel half finished and too slight for its subject matter. At no point does the film really get under the skin of Wilson or the people around him. It feels superficial and light and more like a caper movie than a film about a genuine political event of historic importance. Now I'm not saying it has to be dour and serious but it just felt like a waste of the talent involved (and that includes cast and crew). Sorkin's script is decent and breezy and he manages to get in a number of his usual corridor walk-and-talks in to the film whilst Nichol's is always a director you can rely on. The star of the show is Philip Seymour Hoffman though. In many ways he is the moral core and he also gets all the best lines.

La Jetée - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056119/

Chris Marker's short film that inspired Twelve Monkeys is still a powerful experience almost 50 years on. Shot in stark black and white and exclusively using still images the film has a hypnotic and poetic beauty that gets under the skin but is hard to describe why. Twelve Monkeys essentially uses La Jetée's plot (the population move underground after a future world war and experiment with time travel to gain resources. Prisoner/lab rat travels to the past and is linked to a woman from his past only to appear in an airport where

his past self as a child witnesses his future selfs murder

). This film strips everything down to the basics but is perhaps more powerful because of its simplicity and the romance is more truthful and immediate. Some will probably find it up its own arse a bit but it is such a unique experience everyone should give it a try.

The Pied Piper - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069086/

Greed, corruption, ignorance, and disease. Midsummer, 1349: the Black Death reaches northern Germany. Minstrels go to Hamelin for the Mayor's daughter's wedding to the Baron's son. He wants her dowry to pay his army while his father taxes the people to build a cathedral he thinks will save his soul. A local apothecary who's a Jew seeks a treatment for the plague; the priests charge him with witchcraft. One of the minstrels, who has soothed the Mayor's daughter with his music, promises to rid the town of rats for the fee. The Mayor agrees, then renigs. In the morning, the plague, the Jew's trial, and the Piper's revenge come at once.

This months Sight and Sound highlighted this forgotten Jaques Demy movie and gave it a pretty glowing review so I decided to import the DVD as they have often steered me in the direction of some less well known gems. Not this time. Considering the people involved I am shocked that this is as bad as it is. Admittedly Demy can be patchy but I thought I was in safer hands with the man responsible for The Umbrellas of Cherbourg. The film is, obviously, a retelling of the story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin with added evil church folk. Folk icon Donovan plays the titular Piper and even provides three insipid songs. The rest of the cast is pretty strong on paper with a young John Hurt in a key role along with Donald Pleasence (the only one who comes out looking good), Diana Dors and a smattering of respected British character actors. Unfortunately they are all terrible and some performances border on the embarrassing. The Bishops even evoke memories of Monty Pythons Spanish Inquisition sketch although they aren't helped with their ridiculously large and puffy costumes. The film also suffers from some of the worst ADR I've ever seen/heard. It isn't an element I normally notice in a film but it sticks out like a sore thumb here. The script doesn't help proceedings either and I did feel sorry for some of the actors as certain lines were excruciating. I'm thinking of asking Sight and Sound to give me my £10 back.

I also watched The Orphanage again for a second time. I actually think this might be the best horror film of the last 15 years. It isn't the scariest by any means but much like Rosemary's Baby it works on more than one level and takes you on a far greater emotional journey than most recent horror films do. It rarely resorts to using cheap scares yet adheres faithfully to the conventions of a ghost story whilst not suffering from niggling plot holes (something that does seem to affect modern horror). It looks beautiful and Belén Rueda's performance as Laura is brilliant.

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La Jetée - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056119/

Chris Marker's short film that inspired Twelve Monkeys is still a powerful experience almost 50 years on. Shot in stark black and white and exclusively using still images the film has a hypnotic and poetic beauty that gets under the skin but is hard to describe why. Twelve Monkeys essentially uses La Jetée's plot (the population move underground after a future world war and experiment with time travel to gain resources. Prisoner/lab rat travels to the past and is linked to a woman from his past only to appear in an airport where

his past self as a child witnesses his future selfs murder

). This film strips everything down to the basics but is perhaps more powerful because of its simplicity and the romance is more truthful and immediate. Some will probably find it up its own arse a bit but it is such a unique experience everyone should give it a try.

I'm not a fan of Twelve Monkeys (I have the idea that Gilliam didn't know what he was doing half of the time, which seems to be case after watching the documentary), but La Jetée is one of my favourite films ever. Simple, yet extremely powerful. And with some beautiful imagery.

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This morning I watched The Game Plan on Blu Ray - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0492956/

It is about an american football NFL superstar quarterback called Joe Kingman (played by Dwanye "The Rock" Johnson) for Boston Rebels. He was a single guy who life was shaken up with new arrival. He had a girl visitor (Peyton Kelly) who went to his apartment and told him he is the father of her.

She ran away from her ballet school while her aunt went aboard for holiday. While Joe Kingman and Peyton bond. They did things like going to ballet school in Boston. Did a ballet play in School and many more stuff. The ballet school teacher Monique Vasquez (played by Roselyn Sanchez) is gorgeous.

If you ever want to see Dwayne doing ballet watch the film.

There is lot of things happening in the film I enjoyed as it is very funny. It is about overcoming the odds and reaching the goal.

The acting is good as well. Dwayne have done very well even he have to learn how to play as a quarterback as he played for defensive linesman in University of Miami in the past. Mrs Kevin "Kyra Sedgwick" Bacon was a sport agent and her character is crap.

I love the film. Everything is spot on apart from the sport agent. It is very family friendly film. I give it 4 stars out 5. Blu Ray disc is excellent and it have entertaining extras as well.

Random thought

Why do American Football and Baseball films are fantastic to watch when football films are crap in comparison.

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You, The Living.

you-the-living.jpg

It's a Swedish film by a Swedish guy, Roy Andersson, who mostly directs adverts with a distinctive downbeat style, many of which can be caught on youtube (can't provide links as I'm at work).

It's a series of something like fifty short vignettes to a static camera, like a photograph or a tableaux, linked together by mood, some repeated ideas, the oompah-ing of a jolly tuba and its brass band mates on the soundtrack, and the occasional vague inter-connection between characters. They sometimes seemed like clever adverts in need of a product to promote. The post-war Swedish interiors look beautiful, and the strange faces and bodies of his actors are all arresting. I'm not sure I enjoyed the film throughout it's length, but there were some visual ideas that I won't forget in a hurry. Some good jokes that would have played well with a silent movie audience. I might have a look at "Songs from the Second Floor", his preceding movie in a similar style.

As some examples:

A man relates a dream where he's at a dinner party, and does the tablecloth trick, send the crockery crashing down, and is sentenced to death for the crime.

A group of commuters shelter from a rainstorm under a bus shelter. Another guy runs up, but there's no room for him and he's left out in the storm

A rejected woman has a dream where she marries her lover, which has a visual coup that I won't spoil

ff20080418a4a.jpg

A tired psychiatrist relates how he's given up on listening to people. People are just mean and selfish. You can't make them happy. He just prescribes ever stronger pills.

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A man relates a dream where he's at a dinner party, and does the tablecloth trick, send the crockery crashing down, and is sentenced to death for the crime.

The coup de grâce of that joke being the reveal of what was hidden under the tablecloth!

Did you see it at the NFT yesterday, Graham_S? Not to intentionally freak you out or anything, but I was also in the audience for You, the Living.

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The coup de grâce of that joke being the reveal of what was hidden under the tablecloth!

Did you see it at the NFT yesterday, Graham_S? Not to intentionally freak you out or anything, but I was also in the audience for You, the Living.

No I missed what was under the cloth at the time, but the reviews I read last night clued me in. I left to catch my train as the credits rolled, but one review made me fear that I'd missed some sort of conclusion after the credits. Were the

bombers flying over the city

the last things on screen?

Yes, it was at the NFT. I was in the back row. I'd sneaked out of some godawful hip-hop thing at the QEH for a bit, and an impromptu "You, The Living" seemed like a good way of playing truant from that cacophony. Hopefully I'll get the chance to buy you a drink after a film some time.

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No I missed what was under the cloth at the time, but the reviews I read last night clued me in. I left to catch my train as the credits rolled, but one review made me fear that I'd missed some sort of conclusion after the credits. Were the

bombers flying over the city

the last things on screen?

They were the last things on screen before the credits, yes.

Yes, it was at the NFT. I was in the back row. I'd sneaked out of some godawful hip-hop thing at the QEH for a bit, and an impromptu "You, The Living" seemed like a good way of playing truant from that cacophony.

I think you made the right choice. I was sat in the front row; far too close to the screen, but late comers have to be happy with whatever they can get.

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I caught Hors de Prix/Priceless at the local cinema earlier this week. I knew very little about it going in; I'd only really seen the poster, which just screams 'AWFUL FLUFFY LIGHT SENTIMENTAL TOSH'. However, I came away very pleasantly surprised. Audrey Tautou plays a gold-digger flitting from one sugar daddy to the next in search of one big score to set her up for life. She saunters down to the bar of the hotel she's staying at late one night, only to mistake one of the staff for a wealthy patron. He's infatuated, she's after some spondoolicks and that's pretty much it. Given such a light premise, it really shouldn't be that worthy, but I really enjoyed it. Tautou does well to bring a certain sense of likeability to her character, which is some feat seeing as she's a complete and utter bitch for a large portion of the film. Gad Elmaleh is superb as the infatuated barman, and the chemistry between the two main characters is perfect. It's entirely predictable, of course, as the majority of romantic comedies are, but it's just got a special something that lifts it above the mire.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0482088/

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