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Atomiswave and Naomi Thread


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Could you buy a 2nd hand DC and use the part for GD rom and so on.

Funnily enough, if my GD drive busts, I can rip the drive out of a DC. The hardware part number is exactly the same between the two (daughter board with the drive mech/laser+pcb). So instead of a £40 spare, it's £15 for a DC

Getting my Atomiswave tomorrow. Just thought I'd share my excitement with the rest of the forum...

what/where did you get?

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Yay! Somebody else cares!!

I wish I had room for a cab. I don't even have room for a motherboard, to be honest, but that's what I've got. It's hooked up with my supergun. Got 5 games:

Knights of Valor

NeoGeo Battle Coliseum

KOF Neowave

Rumble Fish

Guilty Gear Isuka

I can throw some impressions and piccys up (like the Hyper 64 stuff I did before) if people are interested.

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  • 1 month later...

I was thinking of getting an Atomiswave board, but then I thought real hard about it and decided that the only two games I really wanted that couldn't be had on the PS2 were Dolphin Blue and Knights of Valor. That sushi puzzle game that never materialized looked like it could have been fun though.

If I could get the motherboard for $75, I'd go for it tho.

What puzzles me is why did Sammy make the Atommiswave in the first place? Wouldn't it have been better to make a JAMMA version of the NAOMI? You can't be telling me that the extra 32 Meg of RAM in the NAOMI ROM system would make it cost prohibitive.

That way the system would have had the NAOMI library as a selling point and wouldn't have split arcade developers between the two platforms. It's all the more baffling when you consider that new NAOMI ROM games are still being developed and released.

There's an untold story of sorts here. Dreamcastmaster, do you have any insight on this puzzle?

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Sega Sammy didn't start until 2004. When the Atomiswave was released, GD-ROM was the defining format (roms have only come back into being because GD's were getting to expensive to produce without the DC around) . Atomiswave is also modular, whereas the Naomi requires seperate I/O boards for gun/driving games and additional wiring from the main I/O to them. Also, although the Naomi was made as a JVS system, it was designed to be used with jamma as well, Sega produced several Jamma adapters, and Capcom made their own for their six button titles. Additionally Awave is between Dreamcast and Naomi. Both have more sound ram then DC, but only Naomi has more video ram. I expect production costs were probably higher for the Naomi at the time, and the initial Awave games were all by Sammy. I expect the saving on software licensing paid for the hardware licensing.

I've never understood the need for the system myself, but it's not as straight forward as you suggest. it's a strange system thats for sure, most of the big name titles can be had for a fiver on ps2 (and play pretty much identically), and often have more features then the arcade versions (KOFXI for example has characters that were crazily not included in the arcade release). The exception seems to be Metal Slug 6 (the version in the Collection isn't amazing), but at £250 without the motherboard, it can go jump

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The exception seems to be Metal Slug 6 (the version in the Collection isn't amazing), but at £250 without the motherboard, it can go jump

I wonder if the stand alone PS2 version is any different.

Re the Atomiswave, I'm still sure they could have achieved all of that using a Naomi compatible system rather than re-inventing the wheel, but what you say makes sense.

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  • 11 years later...
On 13/02/2021 at 18:34, Grey Fox said:

Pretty much all playable on Dreamcast now too.....

 

There are more perfect Atomiswave conversions on Dreamcast now than previously known Atomiswave games (!?) including a few unreleased boards like the aforementioned Sushi Bar someone mentioned eleven years ago. It's wonderful madness.

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Are all of the conversions playable on a real Dreamcast? I recall seeing comments a few months ago that there were freezes/slowdown due to GD-ROM drive access speeds (which is obviously slower than the arcade ROMs), as well as concern it would eventually kill drives due to the continuous data access.

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2 hours ago, knightbeat said:

Are all of the conversions playable on a real Dreamcast? I recall seeing comments a few months ago that there were freezes/slowdown due to GD-ROM drive access speeds (which is obviously slower than the arcade ROMs), as well as concern it would eventually kill drives due to the continuous data access.

 

Only a few of them work properly as burned, converted CDI files read by a stock GD-ROM drive.

 

Generally thought they're meant to be played using an ODE like a GDEMU or a MODE. Many users like to use adaptors that use the serial port too (which despite the slower read times appear to work fine).

 

Freezes can be avoided by making sure the SD card has been defragmented. In my case - out of about 25-odd Atomiswave conversions - I've only experienced freezing in two exceptionally data hungry games: Metal Slug 6 and Fish of the North Star. However, since I reformatted & defragged the card I run them off I've had no problems.

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