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Good cinema experiences you'll never forget


Capwn
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Actually, The Matrix was a big one for me. I remember going with my little sister and my father to the cinema a while after it came out, and they wanted to see Ang Lee's "Anna and the King". I had little or no interest seeing that particular film, so my father bought me a ticket for The Matrix, after making the ticket clerk think that he was going to see The Matrix, while my sister and I would go and watch Chow Yun Fat prance around, pretending to be Yul Brynner. So, I went into the (practically empty) screen, utterly ignorant as to what the film was about. At the moment the first bullet-time shot appeared on the screen (Carrie-Anne Moss kicking the policeman in the chest), my notions of what was possible in the world of cinema were completely flipped upside down - my 12 year-old mind was truly blown.

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40 Year Old Virgin, on my own. I think I was a virgin at the time too, and it seemed quite likely to me that I would end up being a virgin into my 40s.

The cinema was nearly empty, save for what I took to be a genuine 40 year old virgin man sat right in the middle of the front row on his own, and a young couple sat at the back on the left, kissing and fondling each other. I heard the boy yelp a couple of times with what I took to be tremendous sexual pleasure and I've never felt so alone in my entire life.

I think you misunderstand the title of the thread, Adam old boy.

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3. Watching Independence Day on Independence Day in a NY cinema. Normally, I hate "interactive" audiences, but I have never experienced anything like seeing the whole theatre rise and roar their approval at the end of the film.

Yeah I saw it in the States too. It was quite an experience. We cheered when the White House blew up. Got a few glares from people nearby.

As for my best experience...When I was 18 we used to go to the pub and then go see midnight screenings at the local cinema. One week we went to see what was on and there was this new release that nobody had heard much about other than it was supposed to be good. So we went in not expecting anything much and came out completely blown away. The film was The Usual Suspects. Its one film I'm so pleased I saw not knowing anything about.

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I can't even remember which film I was going to see - I was in the small local cinema with a mate when we were about 12 or 13...and one of the trailers was for Back to the Future 2. I can still vividly remember the clip with the holographic shark and when Marty bursts through a door in the 1950s, knocking his earlier self unconscious.

BTTF was one of my favourite ever movies I didn't even know they were bringing out a sequel. I'm not kidding, I nearly shat myself with excitement.

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Good topic.

I'll throw in my hat with Jurassic Park. Incredible spectacle. Couldn't believe what I was seeing. Same goes for The Matrix. Astonishing on first viewing.

We ran a series of films at our local indie cinema when I did a National Diploma in Media in '92, and we put on fa series of horror films - The Thing, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, Dance of the Vampires, Dawn of the Dead and American Werewolf. We did all the marketing and guff and we got quite a decent audience for all of them. I remember Dance of the Vampires was one of the worst prints I had ever seen at the cinema. I'm sure someone had been physically sick on it. God knows where it had been resting when it ras requested from the BFI or wherever it came from. The Thing and American Werewolf were particularly excellent though - after only being used to seeing them on crappy old VHS, seeing them massive in really good condition was like watching them for the first time. Brilliant. Dawn of the Dead, unfortunately, was the viewing that really put me off the film. It was the 120 minute version so almost all the gore had been excised, and what was left was just a really dull film about zombies. To this day, I still never understand what people see in it. And Henry was interesting. Really slammed the audience in their seats and at the end no one moved for quite some time. Had a real effect on people that sat there - really showed how much more effective and powerful a film can be when seen on the big screen and in a proper setting, rather than at home in comfort.

Which also reminds me of Man Bites Dog. I remember everyone giggling and stuff at the beginning, but by the end, it was just silence. Another one where it took time for anyone to move.

Lastly, I'm gonna have to throw in Twister. It's not that great now, but on a massive screen with sound that literally shook the theatre, when that F5 is just filling the screen at the end of the film... It was like being forced back in your seat. Never experienced anything like it before or after.

Oh, yeah, Rocky IV. In Grimsby Odeon. People were stood up, cheering him on against Drago. Crazy. But brilliant.

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The last one I had is probably the most emotional of all the great cinema experiences I've had.

I went to see 'Dancer in the Dark', and I think I was the only male in the entire room. Right at the end where Björks character is hung, at least 70% of the audience just started to cry, proper crying with snot and tears and sulking...it was so powerful I was actually dragged along, shedding quite a few tears myself.

I watched the movie again a couple of years later, and the same scene did nothing for me, it didn't move me in the slightest, so surely the mood in the theatre had a lot to do with my enjoyment of the film, and overall experience of watching it in the cinema.

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Rocky IV

Along with my brother and a friend or two I was dropped off at the local cinema every Saturday afternoon while Mum and Dad went shopping. It was a golden time where I witnessed such classics as Ghostbusters, Top Gun, The Goonies and Back to The Future. It was the first Saturday matinee of Rocky IV that I will remember most fondly. This was an old style cinema with only 2 screens, a large one and a small one in back. The large had at least 1000 seats and the small maybe 100-150. This was also in the days when queuing around the cinema was a regular occurence before getting in. This afternoon was packed out with schoolkids from across town. Thanks to VHS, the A Team and more likely really wobbly pirate ciopies of Rocky 3, the fourth installment was a guaranteed cine filler. Anyway the picture I'm trying to paint is that the place was full with kids under 14.

Fast forwarding to the Apollo fight and we now have 500 kids with very little doubt in their mind as to who the bad guy is. So when it finally comes time for the big fight, the one where despite him being the underdog and coming through 3 times before there's no way Rocky can possibly win against this man mountain that is Ivan Drago. Maybe if the entire audience offered vociferous vocal support we can help Rocky fight this man, and we did. "ROCKY, ROCKY, ROCKY" from the moent he stepped in the ring everyone in the cinema is on their feet, cheering screaming stamping their feet. Actually drowning out the film. Utterly amazing scenes, but not the reason I remember this screening with such fondness or the most memorable part of that day. That comes when The Siberian Express appears on the screen.

If I thought the support for Rocky was overwhelming it is nothing, nothing compared to the hate and vitriol that this audience has in store for Drago. Kwenchy cups are thrown at the sceen as he makes his entrance, followed by bottles, ice lollies, cans. Once every kid in the room has emptied their pockets some start to look for other things to throw at the screen. By the time the fight is over and Rocky has won there are at least 10 cinema chairs lying on the stage below the rising credits. When he lights come on you can see spaces like missing teeth in a boxer's mouth all across the auditorium. One kid is even up on the stage looking for the shoe that was either thrown by him or someone close enough to take one off him.

these days I can't imagine an audience actually being that dragged into into a film so much that a small scale riot occurs and that kind of saddens me a little.

I actually went to see Rocky IV again later that same evening with my dad and unsurprisingly there were a whole bunch of new rules in that cinema regarding what you could take in with you. :angry:

Menace II Society

I dogged a psychology lecture at Uni to nip into Glasgow and catch this at the only cinema it was playing at. I got in as the adverts were showing and not long after a couple of old ladies easily in their 60's came in and sat down in front of me. Initially I was annoyed at them as you get when someone sits right i front of you in a near empty cinema, but then I'm thinking surely they aren't in to see a gritty portayal of life in the Hood with excessive violence and I was right. The thing about the start of Menace is that from the very first seond, even before the New Line logo is finished being displayed it's all "Muthafucka, bitch, fuck, bitch, nigga etc...." So I got a good laugh as these two old dears made a run for the door realising that this wasn't Mrs Doubtfire they had wandered into.

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Oh shit yeah. RockyIV at the cinema was a riot...
Oh, yeah, Rocky IV. In Grimsby Odeon. People were stood up, cheering him on against Drago. Crazy. But brilliant.
Rocky IV

these days I can't imagine an audience actually being that dragged into into a film so much that a small scale riot occurs and that kind of saddens me a little.

I don't think there's been a film since that did this on such as scale.

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Matrix was a definite one for me. I had no idea what the film was about, other than it had Keanu Reeves in it and was an action film. Needless to say my expectations were low, and I was absolutely stunned.

Fight Club, for almost exactly the same reason. I was working at a cinema at the time, and had not really been interested in the film as from the title and promo shot of topless Brad Pitt it hardly looked cerebral. But hey, I had some free tickets to use and I might as well give it a shot, right? From the opening shot of Edward Norton with a gun in his mouth and his inner monologue I was hooked. The twist caught me unawares and made for probably my most fondly remembered cinema experience.

On a lesser not, I would add Gods and Monsters and Pi. In keeping with my above reasoning, I had little prior knowledge of the films and went to see them due to me having free tickets and time to kill. Pi was incredible, and firmly put Aronofsky on my radar. Gods and Monsters stunned me most with Brendan Fraser proving that he could actually fucking act! I was expecting him to be really shown up by Ian McKellen, but he is awesome in that film. At one point there is some gayness and you can see a willy. My friend I went to see it with said he was going to leave as a male penis obviously made him feel uncomfortable. I told him that if he walked out that he should not bother coming to see films with me in the future, as I was damned if I would go to the cinema with someone who would walk out of such an amazing film on the basis that he can not handle a half-second shot of a naked bloke. He stayed, in obvious homophobic discomfort. Anyone who has not seen the film should hunt down a copy, a real undiscovered gem.

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The Happening, at the Cornerhouse in Nottingham.

Saw it with my girlfriend, I thought it was brilliant, the rest of the audience loved it and people actually clapped at the end. Later on I found out that the rest of the planet thought it was one of the worst movies of all time, which made the cinema experience all the more sweeter. There's not many people who liked the film, but by some chance of fate, all those who did happened to see it at the same time and in the same place, and it made for a pretty great collective experience.

Also, the bit in the middle with the massive jump moment was brilliant cos the entire cinema actually screamed and went 'aaaah!!' (including me).

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i really enjoy the cinema anyway. if i go to an odeon with my mates i will pay the extra quid for all of us to use the fancy seats as the extra bit of comfort makes it a more relaxing experience.

the best eperience i had was down to south park the movie. it was during the days of dial up so internet spoliers had yet to permeate my cinema going life and i was totally unprepared for the level of swearing in it. what was great was that everyone in that showing was of the sime mind set, and during the uncle fucker song routine everyone was in hysterics and really really struggling for breath. i have never laughed like that since.

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In order of viewing dates

Star Wars - 1978 reshowing, first cinema experience and instantly bown away

Superman- 1979? Cardiff Queen Street ABC the queue alone freaked me out, and the film was amazing.

Ghostbusters- 1984(IIRC) amazing scenes and singing along with the theme music(I was only wee)

LOTR Trilogy- Made me excited every Christmas for 3 years.

Beowulf in RealD - Made me realise it can be worth going to the cinema again.

Bad cinema experience Reservior Dogs on LSD- not a good call that one.

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In order of viewing dates

Star Wars - 1978 reshowing, first cinema experience and instantly bown away

Superman- 1979? Cardiff Queen Street ABC the queue alone freaked me out, and the film was amazing.

Ghostbusters- 1984(IIRC) amazing scenes and singing along with the theme music(I was only wee)

LOTR Trilogy- Made me excited every Christmas for 3 years.

Beowulf in RealD - Made me realise it can be worth going to the cinema again.

Bad cinema experience Reservior Dogs on LSD- not a good call that one.

Oh fuck yes. I was in London and made whinging faces at the thought of going to 'a show', must have done a good job cos I got my way so we saw this in Leicester Square. When the theme kicked in it was so loud my parents faces were like a bulldog licking piss off a nettle. It was brilliant.

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I saw a load of classic films in the cinema over the last year; Bladerunner, Raging Bull, Terminator, A Matter of Life and Death and a few more. They all pretty much blew my mind, Bladerunner especially. It was a digital presentation and looked incredible.

For new releases my best recent memory was The Dark Knight. I was really looking forward to it once the cast was announced so I steered clear of all threads, virals and trailers so I went in knowing pretty much nothing about it. I bailed out of work early on the day it opened and got tickets for the biggest screen here. Got there nice and early and bagged a great seat; bang in the middle and the right distance from the screen so it filled my screen of vision completely. It totally blew me away. The audience clapped and cheered a few times and when I left I bought tickets for a show the following day. Amazing.

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I went to Star Wars Episode III with my dad. I didn't quite realise how bad the prequels were at the time, and neither did the hundreds of Star Wars fans equipped with lightsabers (it was the day after the première or something). After a while I started to realise how shockingly bad it all was, but the proof came right at the end. At the infamour "Noooooooooooooo..." bit, my dad and I looked at each other and couldn't stop laughing until the credits.

Other fond memories are that of Night of the Hunter, which looked absolutely amazing on the big screen, and No Country for Old Men. I expected some of it, but it was exactly the kind of film I wanted to see.

And of course Solyaris, the original. I fought for hours to keep my eyes open, but all in all it was a great nap.

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Probably the last great expeience would be the LOTR Trilogy.

Fellowship I pretty much didnt know anything about but my mate was well into it. Enjoyed it but it was only during the YOU SHALL NOT PASS bit I started to realise just how great this film was. Saw that another 4 times in the cinema and then in the cinema field at glastonbury.

Two Towers and Return of the King were different affairs. In the meantime I had read all the books watched fellowship another few times on DVD and then Extended edition on DVD. Bought tickets for the first night WEEKS in advance and queued up for about three hours to get decent seats. Those two were the only time I have experienced the "american" style of cinema watching with everyone laughing at the funny bits cheering and clapping not just at the end but after various set pieces(Legolas Vs the Oliphant being the only one I can directly remember.

Reading that back it looks like I was about 10. I Was actully 21 when fellowship came out.

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Star Wars (1978) in the ABC in Clydebank. I was only five at the time but the opening for that still stands out in my mind. Sitting there as a 'real' huge spaceship passed over the screen, the doors blasting open and Vader walking in to shot after a barrage of laser gun fire.

Going from what sci-fi I'd seen before to that was like going from a ZX81 to a 360/PS3, you couldn't quite believe how good it was.

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Flash Gordon - First time I'd ever been to the cinema and it was utterly epic. We went to a 7.30 showing and I remember we parked on the street and not a car park. The film even had an intermission and they swore! I was in awe by it all.

Superman II - First film I saw that my dad took me to and it was equally brilliant. I can't remember being amazed by the sense of scale, though I must have been, but what sticks in my mind is when Superman returns and floats outside the window. Brilliant.

Fourth Protocol - Average film but I always remember it because there was me, my mate big Ste and some old bloke in the entire theatre (we used to go every Saturday, regardless what was on) and this guy had bought a fucking picnic's worth of food. He just kept eating through out the entire film.

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Dead Man's Shoes at the local indie cinema.

I was with a different lass at the time and because the movie took forever to start, she got bored and decided to take liberties with my knob instead. Not that I was complaining, mind you.

The movie wasn't bad, either.

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