Jump to content
IGNORED

Sci Fi recommendations


marlonharewood
 Share

Recommended Posts

I think I must be the only one unmoved by Enders Game. A solid piece of sci-fi but nothing special was my opinion after reading it (And the rest of the series). But then I can't talk. I love late era Heinlein.

I thought it was above average, but not the best Sci-Fi novel ever by any stretch. The denuoement was blindingly obvious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a heads up. The Zones of Thought omnibus is listed at £4.99 on amazon. I ordered mine a few days ago and it arrived today. It's a meaty fucker and contains both books in the series so far, A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky. There were some positive reviews earlier in the thread about it but I was hesitant because of the price at the time. £4.99, however was just too good to pass up. Bargainalicious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone got any good cyber punk style recommendations? I've read all the Richard Morgan books, most of Gibsons's books and was wondering what to try next. Please no Iain M Banks tho I really can't stand his writing.

Snow Crash? Not sure it's technically cyberpunk, but if you liked Morgan's work you may enjoy Stephenson's. He's nowhere near as visceral, and his tongue is often near his cheek but he's great at conjuring up fantastical future settings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Snow Crash counts, and it's a good one to read if you're familiar with the genre as he took the piss out of a lot of the conventions (which of course was completely lost on me as I read it before reading any Gibson or Sterling books).

The Star Fraction by Ken MacLeod is a cyberpunk-esque novel set in a future Britain fractured by war (featuring talking guns and AIs, so I guess that covers some of the cyberpunk bases).

Avoid Neal Asher. He does write cyberpunk, but his writing is terrible and so are his stories.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone read Eon by Greg Bear? I picked it up over Christmas as it's in the Sci Fi Masterworks list and figured it would be worth a go, but a few pages in and it's already ticking some of the bad cliché boxes of hard sci-fi - stilted dialogue and unbelievable characters whose backgrounds are given ridiculous amounts of exposition. Usually I would just stick it out, but as it's just shy of 500 pages I'm not sure if I can be bothered, especially after recently reading Tau Zero, which had similar faults.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone read Eon by Greg Bear? I picked it up over Christmas as it's in the Sci Fi Masterworks list and figured it would be worth a go, but a few pages in and it's already ticking some of the bad cliché boxes of hard sci-fi - stilted dialogue and unbelievable characters whose backgrounds are given ridiculous amounts of exposition. Usually I would just stick it out, but as it's just shy of 500 pages I'm not sure if I can be bothered, especially after recently reading Tau Zero, which had similar faults.

It's got all that, but once he moves past the exposition and the story kicks in it gets a lot lot better. I reckon it's worth sticking it out, at least until KEY PLOT POINT occurs a few chapters in and the story turns on its head. You'll know it when it happens. If you're still bored after that, then drop it and move on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Avoid Neal Asher. He does write cyberpunk, but his writing is terrible and so are his stories.

Wash your mouth out. Neal Asher writes great space opera. I'm not really sure why you think he's a cyberpunk writer mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wash your mouth out. Neal Asher writes great space opera. I'm not really sure why you think he's a cyberpunk writer mind.

Gridlinked?

Having said that, I did think that Cowl was a pretty decent time-travel yarn and much better than Gridlinked but not so much that I wanted to read more (his political views are fairly abhorrent and didn't help matters, much like Orson Scott Card).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apart from the name it's about as far from Cyberpunk as it's possible to get. The entire series is space opera.

And oh yes. We can agree totally about his political views. It's like Bruce decided to write sci-fi and move to Greece. I have his blog in my RSS reader since it's handy to find out about his new books but his political posts are painful.

It's quite amusing reading the Cormac series in order. Up until the last few books he doesn't really let his politics colour the books to any real visible degree but then the ruling AIs basically become Labour.

*Edit*. I didn't actually like Cowl that much. It was pretty good but it didn't grab me like the Polity stuff. I'm a sucker for ships so big they can't go near planets slugging it out. For me he's like Iain Banks without the literary wanking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone got any good cyber punk style recommendations? I've read all the Richard Morgan books, most of Gibsons's books and was wondering what to try next. Please no Iain M Banks tho I really can't stand his writing.

Maybe more steam punk than cyber punk but I enjoyed The Windup Girl from Paolo Bacigalupi.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a heads up. The Zones of Thought omnibus is listed at £4.99 on amazon. I ordered mine a few days ago and it arrived today. It's a meaty fucker and contains both books in the series so far, A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky. There were some positive reviews earlier in the thread about it but I was hesitant because of the price at the time. £4.99, however was just too good to pass up. Bargainalicious.

What do you mean "so far"? There's only two of them, from over a decade ago, and they're only very tenuously linked anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Ah Sci Fi, enjoyed perusing this thread and have just ordered a book as a result thanks :)

I think most of the books I would recommend have already been mentioned to be honest but heres my list anyway :)

Unmissable:

Dune series, the daddy.

Endymion series. Magnificent, and influential.

Banks culture books (start with Consider Phlebas and read in publication order). Sublime.

Anything by Alistair Reynolds. Gritty , imaginative and vast in scope.

P.F. Hamilton. great stuff but all flawed in some way still hugely enjoyable.

Silver Star, these are still really good books :)

Richard K. Morgan , brutal and action packed.

Ringworld series , again amazingly influential.

Hothouse , B aldiss. Pretty ahead of his time with regards to environmental issues lol , really odd and interesting book.

Chaga by Ian McDonald. again really interesting read.

Dragons Egg. R.L.forward. I read this a long time ago and LOVED it.

If anyone can recommend anything else on a par with this stuff I would love it, everything else I read tends to feel pale in comparison, I will admit I need to read william gibsons stuff so that's on my list already. Just reading Spinward Fringe series, brainless. Read the Progenitor (first two), readable but not great. Read Some Ben Bova and Niven which is fine i guess. Red Mars *yawn*, etc etc lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Friday (heinlein)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Friday-Robert-Heinlein/dp/034530988X/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1320282284&sr=1-2

and if you like sci-fi comedy, Illegal Aliens (foglio) (yes, the same phil foglio who penciled the "what if?" comics in the dragon magazine, the original starblaze adaptation of "myth adventures" by robert asprin and currently "girl genius")

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Illegal-Aliens-Books-Nick-Pollotta/dp/0880387157/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1320282226&sr=8-18 (best to find a used copy, new copies apparently go for silly money these days)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Highly recommed the Paratwa trilogy from Chris Hinz. The first one Liege-Killer is available second hand or ebook from Amazon.

My link

Basically near future, Earth orbital colonies terrorised by mind-linked assassins. Some lovely tech and a great, pacey plot. The subsequent two books up the ante significantly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been reading Philip Palmer's Version 43 after recommends on here. It's pretty odd! Quite amusing too. But yeah, oddly inconsistent in tone, seemingly deliberately so. I can't quite grasp if I should think of it as a comedy or a drama or what sometimes. Anyway, worth it. Also, my first book bought from the comfort of my bed. A milestone.

I wish Alastair Reynold's dialogue wasn't so awful, I enjoyed all his books apart from that. Gonna be looking for my next sci-fi fix soon I think, maybe I'll check out some of those classics that just got re-released on Kindle format.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone read The Cold Commands?

If so, can someone explain what the heck the following was:

Where did the sorcery stuff come from? I don't remember that at all in the steel remains, or the Hjel dude. Or is it assumed he's learned it in the grey places? And they apparently allow you to go back/forwards in time?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah Sci Fi, enjoyed perusing this thread and have just ordered a book as a result thanks :)

I think most of the books I would recommend have already been mentioned to be honest but heres my list anyway :)

Unmissable:

Dune series, the daddy.

Endymion series. Magnificent, and influential.

Banks culture books (start with Consider Phlebas and read in publication order). Sublime.

Anything by Alistair Reynolds. Gritty , imaginative and vast in scope.

P.F. Hamilton. great stuff but all flawed in some way still hugely enjoyable.

Silver Star, these are still really good books :)

Richard K. Morgan , brutal and action packed.

Ringworld series , again amazingly influential.

Hothouse , B aldiss. Pretty ahead of his time with regards to environmental issues lol , really odd and interesting book.

Chaga by Ian McDonald. again really interesting read.

Dragons Egg. R.L.forward. I read this a long time ago and LOVED it.

If anyone can recommend anything else on a par with this stuff I would love it, everything else I read tends to feel pale in comparison, I will admit I need to read william gibsons stuff so that's on my list already. Just reading Spinward Fringe series, brainless. Read the Progenitor (first two), readable but not great. Read Some Ben Bova and Niven which is fine i guess. Red Mars *yawn*, etc etc lol

Adam Roberts is interestingly different... try Gradisil for starters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been reading Philip Palmer's Version 43 after recommends on here. It's pretty odd! Quite amusing too. But yeah, oddly inconsistent in tone, seemingly deliberately so. I can't quite grasp if I should think of it as a comedy or a drama or what sometimes. Anyway, worth it. Also, my first book bought from the comfort of my bed. A milestone.

He seems to be experimenting with tone quite a lot. He's also rattling off the books at a cracking pace. Artemis is out in December. Debatable Space was pretty harsh with Red Claw being set in the same universe but with a smaller focus. Hellship has a heavy focus on non-humans and really ups the scale and also the timescale.

I'm really looking forward to Artemis

Artemis McIvor is a stone-cold killer and a bibliophile. Raised on the library planet of Rebus, she has a love of books in a future where reading is a lost art. But unfortunately, her story doesn't end there. Artemis has been sentenced to incarceration for multiple murders and she's innocent of these, but guilty of many more which haven't yet come to light. Within days of arrival Artemis is planning her escape, but behind this is a darker strategy. She needs freedom to take revenge on those who have wronged her - and her vengeance is mighty indeed. Yet when she is recaptured, she is faced with a surprising choice that turns out to be no choice at all. She'll have her liberty if she becomes a guerrilla warrior, fighting rebels targeting Earth. Despite being part of a motley crew of criminals and psychopaths, she'd be one of the good guys for the very first time, fighting a war that is all that stands between civilization and depravity. Or if she says no, it'll be the last decision she ever makes.

I'm also a big fan of Neal Asher's books. Gridlinked is the perfect place to start with later books in that series ramping up the scale every book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.