Jump to content
IGNORED

Dune - Denis Villeneuve to direct!


womblingfree
 Share

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, K said:

I wouldn't class Dune as hard SF (I hate the term too). The story is focused on the social and theological upheavals on the planet, and the abuse of the idea of a messiah - all classic territory for social science fiction. I guess you could make an argument that the book pays a lot of attention on the carefully worked out ecology of Dune, but for the most part, it's just background detail. The various technologies in the book like the ornithopters are completely implausible, and things like the mentats taking the place of computers are nonsensical as well - how could you build and organise a culture like that with only a handful of highly trained specialists to use for any kind of calculation a normal human couldn't do? How would a recon satellite work without computers? How could you build something as big and complicated as a spice harvester?

 

Not that any of this matters of course, and most so-called hard SF is just as implausible as Dune when you get down to it, but I don't think it's part of that sub-genre. In practice, I think hard SF mostly just means "space fiction where they don't use FTL to travel between planets".

 

I hadn't even thought about the fact that the book casually talks about weather satellites... how the hell would that be possible without autonomous computers? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saw it on Friday evening and thought it was fabulous. Up there with Star Wars and Jurassic Park for movies that have that amazing ability to capture the imagination and bind you with their movie magic spell. The visuals were incredible - the effects, the sets, locations, the wardrobe - my god, the wardrobe! - everything felt expensive and really weighty. I couldn’t see the joins at any point, it felt entirely cohesive. 
 

I haven’t read Dune, or seen it in any of its previous guises, and I didn’t know what the story was about, so I went in completely cold, and actually I felt it totally worked as a piece that stood on its own and it didn’t require any pre-reading. Spice is incredibly valuable because it enables interstellar travel - boom, done, we got it within the first 60 seconds. Harkkonen are bad bastards and the empire is a dangerous place of murky political subterfuge - the movie sets all this stuff up and respects the audience enough to get it without beating them over the head.
 

(The only thing I didn’t quite get was why they don’t use guns, which I assume is because they’re ineffective against personal shields, but then we do see gun-type weapons used in the movie, to significantly high effect.)

 

The performances were all brilliant, particularly TC who carried the weight of the whole movie on his shoulders. I liked the way Villeneuve spends the first act of the movie establishing the grave peril facing the Atredies faction, which gradually ratchets up until reaching a crescendo later on. Special mention to Javier Bardem, who completely stole the scene he was in early doors, and Jason Moma was a great bad-ass. 
 

Delighted to know that the second part has been greenlit. I think there are a few ways in which this Dune can be compared to Star Wars, and I think it has all the makings of an all-time classic sci-fi adventure saga. As much as I enjoyed Arrival and Blade Runner, they both feel in hindsight like job applications for Dune, and it’s by far the director’s most authorial of the three - particularly Blade Runner, which will always be overshadowed by the peerless original. With Dune, he’s not only made a great film, but done so where others have tried and failed. Hats off to him. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This corridor crew vid mentions a lot of the differences with the 1984 version so if you've not read the book and/or seen that version, it should be eye opening as to how much things got toned down (as well as what is infinitely improved). I would've liked to have seen a truly fucked up guild navigator tbh. I think the nearest we got was the Emperor's entourage who I think were hotboxing spice in their helmets. Do we know who's playing the Emperor for part two? Presumably he's going to make an appearance? Donald Sutherland? :lol:

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Popo said:


 

(The only thing I didn’t quite get was why they don’t use guns, which I assume is because they’re ineffective against personal shields, but then we do see gun-type weapons used in the movie, to significantly high effect.)

 

 

 

 

If you'd like to know, it's not that they're ineffective against shields, it's that they are actively dangerous against shields. That goes for the shields around the city or ships as well. From a Wiki:

 

https://dune.fandom.com/wiki/Shield

 

Quote

However, if a lasgun beam hit a Holtzman field, it would result in sub-atomic fusion and a nuclear explosion. The center of this blast was determined by random chance; sometimes it would originate within the shield, sometimes within the laser weapon, sometimes both.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

19 hours ago, Number 28 said:

This corridor crew vid mentions a lot of the differences with the 1984 version so if you've not read the book and/or seen that version, it should be eye opening as to how much things got toned down (as well as what is infinitely improved). I would've liked to have seen a truly fucked up guild navigator tbh. I think the nearest we got was the Emperor's entourage who I think were hotboxing spice in their helmets. Do we know who's playing the Emperor for part two? Presumably he's going to make an appearance? Donald Sutherland? :lol:

 

 

The miniature work on the ships in the original 1984 film is just :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Davros sock drawer said:

 

 

If you'd like to know, it's not that they're ineffective against shields, it's that they are actively dangerous against shields. That goes for the shields around the city or ships as well. From a Wiki:

 

https://dune.fandom.com/wiki/Shield

 

 

 

 

I think they mean guns in general, rather than lasers - and it's a fair question, since in the film there seems to be a gun that fires a dart that slows when it hits a shield so it can still get through.

 

You'd think the opposing armies would invest in a few thousand of those rather than mess about with swords. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the shots have to be relatively slow moving, so anyone that's hit would have a chance to remove the shot unless it's at the targets back.

So an army would just learn to have a buddy system to swat bullets away as they hit the person next to you.

 

Doesn't Aquaman swat a bullet away that's fire at him for instance ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, taurusnipple said:

Was this shot quite lean? There a chance of an extended cut in the future? 

 

 

There is more footage of Mentat stuff, the banquet, Yeuh's story.  When asked about a longer cut, Villeneuve's said that what we see is his cut.  Not quite an all out no, but probably a no.

 

I wouldn't expect it to happen before part 2 if they do it.  They'll be in a rush to get filming within 12 months. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, monkeydog said:

There is more footage of Mentat stuff, the banquet, Yeuh's story.  When asked about a longer cut, Villeneuve's said that what we see is his cut.  Not quite an all out no, but probably a no.

 

I wouldn't expect it to happen before part 2 if they do it.  They'll be in a rush to get filming within 12 months. 

Ridley Scott said a similar thing about Gladiator, but he qualified his comment saying he doesn't like the term "director's cut" because the original theatrical version released in cinemas was, as far as he was concerned, his director's cut. Didn't stop him releasing an extended cut. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Thor said:

Ridley Scott said a similar thing about Gladiator, but he qualified his comment saying he doesn't like the term "director's cut" because the original theatrical version released in cinemas was, as far as he was concerned, his director's cut. Didn't stop him releasing an extended cut. :)

 

Same with James Cameron and Aliens. He released the Special Edition for fans but said he had final cut on the theatrical version.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found this really frustrating. Great visuals and audio but the story and characters left me completely cold. I'm glad I saw it at the cinema as the spectacle just about kept me engaged. Watching on a small screen I'm not sure I'd have made to the end.

 

There's some great set pieces but I just never felt the movie gave me a reason to care about anything that was happening. I felt very distant and detached, never forming any connection to the characters or care for the story. I'd be vaguely interested in seeing a sequel at the cinema but almost entirely just for the sensory experience. I don't care one jot what happens to the protagonist or all these different races.

 

The second half of the movie in particular, I found tiresome as it skittered from one set-piece, to the next, to the next. Now they're being shot at, now they're trapped in a sandstorm, now they're being chased by a giant worm, now they've been ambushed....it seemed like they were just aimlessly stumbling from one misfortune to another and I got bored. I started craving some decent character writing and downtime to make me care about them, their journey and their fates.

 

The first half was somewhat better at this. I do think it's a very emotionally cold movie on the whole but the first half was more rounded. Never read the book or seen Lynch's adaptation so no idea how they compare and if that's just the way the book is too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Majora said:

I do think it's a very emotionally cold movie on the whole but the first half was more rounded. Never read the book or seen Lynch's adaptation so no idea how they compare and if that's just the way the book is too.

 

"Emotionally cold" describes the book pretty well. There are moments when characters have strong emotional reactions to events, but they're generally accompanied by step-by-step descriptions of the characters' thoughts as they analyse why they're having those thoughts and emotional reactions, and urge themselves to stay calm and rational. The most emotional bit of the book is probably the Duke's "They have tried to take the life of my son!" scene, because that phrase is repeated several times in that chapter.

 

The hand-to-hand fight scenes in the book are similar. The prose doesn't breathlessly focus on the effort and exertion of the fights. Instead, there are lots of analytical descriptions of characters' thought processes as they perform feints, that their opponents know are feints, in order to disguise their real attacks. (This is why the fight scenes in the book are great. :wub:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Nick R said:

The hand-to-hand fight scenes in the book are similar. The prose doesn't breathlessly focus on the effort and exertion of the fights. Instead, there are lots of analytical descriptions of characters' thought processes as they perform feints, that their opponents know are feints, in order to disguise their real attacks. (This is why the fight scenes in the book are great. :wub:)

 

The closest we get to them in films is Downey's Sherlock Holmes fights.

 

I am not in any way advocating Guy Richie's Dune as a good idea.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Nick R said:

 

"Emotionally cold" describes the book pretty well. There are moments when characters have strong emotional reactions to events, but they're generally accompanied by step-by-step descriptions of the characters' thoughts as they analyse why they're having those thoughts and emotional reactions, and urge themselves to stay calm and rational. The most emotional bit of the book is probably the Duke's "They have tried to take the life of my son!" scene, because that phrase is repeated several times in that chapter.

 

The hand-to-hand fight scenes in the book are similar. The prose doesn't breathlessly focus on the effort and exertion of the fights. Instead, there are lots of analytical descriptions of characters' thought processes as they perform feints, that their opponents know are feints, in order to disguise their real attacks. (This is why the fight scenes in the book are great. :wub:)

 

That's interesting, and obviously incredibly difficult to translate to the screen I imagine.

 

Now that I think about it, I do perhaps care somewhat about what happens to the mother (I'm dreadful at remembering character names, sorry). I'm not sure if it's because she's any better written than the others or simply because the acting was so good that it gave her some emotional depth and humanity I didn't particularly get from many of the other characters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So glad I went to the cinema to see this last night. Such an immense sense of scale. The worms!

 

Arrival is one of my favourite films of recent years, and I was supremely grateful that Villeneuve didn’t bollocks up Blade Runner. So I was really glad that this is builds on both of those. 
 

I could just bathe in the world that is presented here for hours. I just loved it, and I think the slightly repressed emotions of the characters suits the tone. 

 

Some of the criticisms here are valid. The film is long, and does feel it in the second half. However, I get the sense this film will reveal more with additional viewings, especially now I already know the structure. I get something new from every time I watch (the original) Blade Runner, and I hope this becomes one of those films for me. 
 

And boy, once Part 2 is out, that’s gonna be a hell of a marathon viewing. And maybe the slightly episodic structure of the second half of the movie will make more sense in that context. 
 

But in short: HURRAH FOR A SPECTACULAR, BEAUTIFUL SPACE MOVIE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Will be able to watch this via digital download from the 17th January. Then on the 31st January the physical media version launches. The 4K disc will include:

 

The Royal Houses

Filmbooks: House Atreides

Filmbooks: House Harkonnen

Filmbooks: The Fremen

Filmbooks: The Spice Melange

Inside Dune: The Training Room

Inside Dune: The Spice Harvester

Inside Dune: The Sardaukar Battle

Building the Ancient Future

My Desert, My Dune

Constructing the Ornithopters

Designing the Sandworm

Beware the Baron

Wardrobe from Another World

A New Soundscape

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6th of December for premium streaming! 🥳

 

https://entertainment.ie/movies/movie-news/dune-stream-from-home-504184/

 

Quote

'Dune' will be available to stream via PVOD from December 6, meaning the film can be viewed at a cost from the likes of Google Play, Amazon Prime, YouTube and others.

The film will be available to download digitally on January 17, 2022, and on 4K, Blu-ray and DVD release from January 31, 2022.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.