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17 hours ago, Totoro said:

Homemade gyoza courtesy of my wife. Me and my son try to help, but it's not so easy!

We make them in bulk so it takes ages, but get to enjoy them for a few days after.

 

 

 

 

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Those looks amazing

 

I make my own. No where near as smart looking as your wife's and with premade wrappers but they are so tasty 

 

Does she also make the dough?

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58 minutes ago, emerald fox said:

 

Those looks amazing

 

I make my own. No where near as smart looking as your wife's and with premade wrappers but they are so tasty 

 

Does she also make the dough?

 

Nope, we get the premade frozen ones. She's had a lot of experience!

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On 10/01/2022 at 18:10, Gotters said:

Not usually a fan of tacos, delicious filling in either a midget fajita wrap or something that shatters as soon as you breathe on it. The taste of these though makes it worthwhile and can use the mince for whatever you want.


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The lime juice pickled onions are great addition and the spice mix is well worth the up front effort.

 

Recipe is well written and key is taking your mince past any moisture being left to almost sawdust, before rehydrating in spicy stock mix. 
 

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/next-level-minced-beef-tacos


Just made these, bloody nice:

 

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Thanks for the inspiration!

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So I finally figured where I was going wrong with my dumplings.

 

For some reason, I think because when I first saw them for sale they were in the freezer. I've been buying the wrappers from the refrigerated section and putting straight into my freezer, and then leaving them out to defrost which of course dries out the edges

 

Despite this I managed to salvage a decent batch, but I'm looking forward to doing it properly next time 

 

Screenshot_20220203-103453~2.png

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1 hour ago, emerald fox said:

So I finally figured where I was going wrong with my dumplings.

 

For some reason, I think because when I first saw them for sale they were in the freezer, I've been buying the wrappers from the refrigerated section and putting straight into my freezer, and then leaving them out to defrost which of course dries out the edges

 

Despite this I managed to salvage a decent batch, but I'm looking forward to doing it properly next time 

 

Screenshot_20220203-103453~2.png

Those look great!  I was inspired to make momo's after a holiday in Nepal and am now inspired to have another go at them or similar type of dumplings next time I am in my local Chinese shop and can get some premade wrappers 😋

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37 minutes ago, ScouserInExile said:

Falafel and shwarma recipes, please!

 

no probs, both Tin Eats (she's not as flash or high end as other places but really does hit the mark for high quality home cook recipes that work as described.

 

Shwarma is great, only thing I had to search for was ground cardamom (eventually found it in Morrisons and Amazon), cooked in a non stick pan and came up a treat.

 

Falafel is also a great recipe to start with (I may tweak slightly) - I think the key part is how you process the rehydrated chickpeas and other bits, last time I used my Thermomix and it tasted brilliant but was slightly more dense than the best falafel I've had from specialist places. Doing again today and a tip I've researched since then is lots of places use a meat grinder to process the chickpeas. I think this helps stop them get over blitzed and will give the texture I'm aiming for.  

 

Both taste great, hope they work for you.

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1 hour ago, Gotters said:

 

no probs, both Tin Eats (she's not as flash or high end as other places but really does hit the mark for high quality home cook recipes that work as described.

 

Shwarma is great, only thing I had to search for was ground cardamom (eventually found it in Morrisons and Amazon), cooked in a non stick pan and came up a treat.

 

Falafel is also a great recipe to start with (I may tweak slightly) - I think the key part is how you process the rehydrated chickpeas and other bits, last time I used my Thermomix and it tasted brilliant but was slightly more dense than the best falafel I've had from specialist places. Doing again today and a tip I've researched since then is lots of places use a meat grinder to process the chickpeas. I think this helps stop them get over blitzed and will give the texture I'm aiming for.  

 

Both taste great, hope they work for you.

I have always used chickpeas when I make falafel but a lot of the good falafel vans I used to go to seemed to use broad beans. I want to try that and see what the difference is.

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1 hour ago, Lovelyman said:

I have always used chickpeas when I make falafel but a lot of the good falafel vans I used to go to seemed to use broad beans. I want to try that and see what the difference is.

 

I know I've tended to think of it as a chickpea dish but as soon as you read about the origins and variations that different places prefer the term falafel is about as descriptive as sausage or pie.

 

I want to get my chickpea method and version nailed then will move on and try some others - I like using the totally unnecessary falafel scoop I've had up in my spare room unused kitchen tool dumping ground for years

 

Stoeckel-Falafel-F_ml.jpg

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Using the coarse setting meat grinder attachment on my stand mixer made a world of difference to the falafel.

 

Identical recipe and cook but they were so much better, lighter inside and perfect outers. Just a little harder to work with raw as not as adhesive as the finer mix the week before, but tasted way better and the texture was perfect. 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Japanese fried chicken, karaage. Quite a clever technique in that you marinade the chicken thigh in liquids (mirin, sake, soy etc) then coat in potato starch, then you leave it in the fridge to set up a bit and turn the dry starch into a dry-ish batter that is absorbing the flavour and marinade. Crunchiest lightest batter I've ever made and great flavour.

 

step 1 ready to fry

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after first 2m fry

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after second fry

fry2.thumb.jpg.21841ed4e3eea0f61535b57a38611e24.jpg

 

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Nice.

 

I saw the video when he posted it and was going to try it out but my local health shop only had massive bags of potato starch in stock so gave it a miss.

 

How messy is it compared to a more traditional fried chicken preparation? I like fried chicken but it's so messy to make.  

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1 hour ago, iknowgungfu said:

My takeaway was closed. Much to my horror so decided to make my own:

 

Aren't you going to introduce us?

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  • 1 month later...

Korean fried chicken. Bitesize bits of boneless thigh fried in potato starch, but never has a pic done such injustice as this does to the sweet/spicy gochujang based sticky sauce, which was delicious.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Brown stew chicken with rice and peas. I’ve never really had any exposure to Caribbean food, and only previously attempted a fairly unpleasant jerk chicken once before.

 

This was much better though, really moreish and tasty without being too spicy, and the pimento/allspice gives it a unique flavour

 

Followed this pretty closely, though i did use a little cornstarch and aggressive reduce at end to thicken up the sauce

https://www.myforkinglife.com/brown-stew-chicken/

 

 

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