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Mozerella Meatballs in a roasted pepper sauce


Mortis
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After using a good few of the recipes in the Ultimate's section I realised how much I missed the old step by step guides we used to get here so after making this and posting a pic in the my dinner thread I decided to give the whole thing a go.

Comments/improvements welcome.

This feeds 3-4 people but if you have too much you can just freeze the meatballs and gravy left over.

The Ingredients

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For the meatballs

500g of lean beef steak mince

50g of breadcrumbs

2 crushed cloves of garlic

1 tablespoon of oregano

some chopped flat leaf parsley

1 teaspoon of salt

1/2 teaspoon of pepper

75g of Mozzarella cheese

3 tablespoons of olive oil

For the Sauce

1 onion - chopped finely

200 ml of beef stock

2 tablespoons of tomato puree

1 jar of roasted peppers

juice of 1 orange

1 tablespoon of balsamic vinegar

Making the meatballs

Put the mince, crushed garlic, breadcrumbs, parsley, salt, pepper and oregano in a bowl and mix well (damp hands works best)

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You should end up with a nice patty of ingredients

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Divide this up into 12 golf ball sized pieces

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Chop your mozzarella into 12 pieces and flatten out the meatball - place the cheese in the centre and then pinch it round to seal and reform into a ball

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Put 3 tablespoons of oil into a frying pan and over a moderate heat fry the meatballs for about 10 mins - turning often to avoid them burning

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Remove from the pan and place to the side.

Making the sauce

Next add the chopped onion to the juices in the pan and fry until it starts to soften. Drain the oil from the jar of peppers - discard the oil and add them along with the juice from the orange, the beef stock, tomato puree and balsamic vinegar and bring to the boil over a moderate heat.

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Using a small hand blender lightly purée the mixture.

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Place the meatball back in the pan - reduce to a low heat and simmer for 25 mins - turning the meatballs and making sure the sauce doesn't stick to the pan.

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You should end up with something like this.

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I like to serve on a base of spaghetti but you can serve with whatever suits your taste.

The finished article (now eaten and enjoyed)

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mmmmmmmm

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Yeah he's a massive loss to the forum but I think as a group we can at least keep his legacy alive by posting our best recipes in here. His format was superb as it gives anyone that's not experienced a decent idea of how the meal should look in various stages. As well as providing some mouth watering pics for everyone :hmm:

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you can just leave some bread in a tray until it starts to dry out a bit and then chuck it in the food processor. It means a bit of preperation in advance though - you should find breadcrumbs in the supermarket near the fish dressing etc.

Shamelessly nicked from a cookery site -

Use your food processor to make dry breadcrumbs. Leave the leftover bread in an uncovered container until it has completely dried. Keeping the bread uncovered will prevent it from becoming moldy and unusable. Before grinding the bread into crumbs, check that it's completely dry. Bread that's brittle on the outside with a soft spot in the center may cause the blade of your food processor to jam - a good way to burn out the motor. It's a good idea to break the bread into smaller pieces before grinding it. Put the pieces of dried bread into the work bowl of the food processor and grind it into even crumbs. A steel blade will produce coarse crumbs, while the grating blade will yield fairly fine crumbs. If you prefer very fine breadcrumbs, grate the bread first and then pass the crumbs through a colander. If you don't have a food processor, a box grater will work, though this method is obviously a lot slower. Store your dry crumbs in an airtight plastic container or zip-lock bag. They'll stay fresh for up to 2 weeks.

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In the end there wasn't much in the way of 'balls'. Anyhow, who cares, it tasted superb!! Will certainly be making this again and trying to improve it. The orange is what makes it I think, it works really well with the peppers. Thanks for a great recipe Mortis.

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Glad you enjoyed - to be fair the 1st time I made it the same thing happened with the meatballs. My best tip is to be quite forceful when resealing the meatball and don't be worried about applying too much pressure. The less little cracks and openings in the patty you can see when it's rolled around the cheese the less likely it is to split open.

Still looks damn tasty though :D

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Looks a delicious recipe!

Just as an idea, any one who wants to make their own roasted peppers instead of buying a jar...

Half some peppers and put them under a hot grill (skin side up) until the skin blackens and blisters. Remove them, then put in a bowl and cling film the top (the moisture will help lift the skins from the flesh). Wait a few mniutes then peel off the skins, chop and enjoy the sweetest peppers ever!

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you can just leave some bread in a tray until it starts to dry out a bit and then chuck it in the food processor. It means a bit of preperation in advance though - you should find breadcrumbs in the supermarket near the fish dressing etc.

Shamelessly nicked from a cookery site -

Use your food processor to make dry breadcrumbs. Leave the leftover bread in an uncovered container until it has completely dried. Keeping the bread uncovered will prevent it from becoming moldy and unusable. Before grinding the bread into crumbs, check that it's completely dry. Bread that's brittle on the outside with a soft spot in the center may cause the blade of your food processor to jam - a good way to burn out the motor. It's a good idea to break the bread into smaller pieces before grinding it. Put the pieces of dried bread into the work bowl of the food processor and grind it into even crumbs. A steel blade will produce coarse crumbs, while the grating blade will yield fairly fine crumbs. If you prefer very fine breadcrumbs, grate the bread first and then pass the crumbs through a colander. If you don't have a food processor, a box grater will work, though this method is obviously a lot slower. Store your dry crumbs in an airtight plastic container or zip-lock bag. They'll stay fresh for up to 2 weeks.

I just blend toast.

I made this tonight. I didn't follow the recipe just nicked the idea of putting mozzerella in meatballs. Bloody loverly.

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