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Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Pt 1 & 2


Goose
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I went to see it this morning and pretty much loved it. It's by far the best so far, and such an improvement over 6. There's actually some emotion portrayed in this one, which makes a massive difference.

A couple of questions for those that have read the book...

How did the sword end up in the pond in the forest of Dean? That wasn't explained at all.

And why was the wand buried with Dumbledore? I didn't get that either.

Other than that, it was easy enough to follow, which is another improvement over the earlier films.

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I guess if you're told now, it spoils reveals later in the other film. Still, from memory:

Question 1

Snape hides the real Griffindor sword. The one at Hogwarts is a fake. Dumbledore warned Snape that Voldemort would be after the sword as it can destroy Horcruxes. So Snape plants it near Harry in the forest and sends his Patronus - a Doe, like Harry's Mum's - to lead him to it.

Question 2

Wizards are, I assume, buried with their wands. Wands are bonded to their owners through a selection process, so there'd be no reason to nab it really. No-one knows it's the Elder wand at this point.

As I say, they'll no doubt explain all that in film #2 anyway :)

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So the first 36 minutes of this has been leaked online. I couldn't resist temptation so had a look, and it's by far the darkest film so far. It's worked as a great teaser, I was planning to go and see it this weekend anyway, but I'll definitely be going now.

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Just got back from seeing it and thought it was very good. It didn't feel over two hours long, although it began dragging a little during the hiding/camping scenes. I'm not sure the young kids will sit still during those bits for long. It opens brilliantly and there are some great action scenes. There is also a beautifully animated scene towards the end when Hermoine tells the story of

The Three Brothers and the wand, resurrection stone and invisibility cloak that make up the Deathly Hallows. Although, there seemed to be no reaction from Harry regarding the cloak. I would have thought that one of them would have acknowledged that Harry's cloak was one of the dealthy hallows. I haven't read the book since launch, so can't remember how this was handled. Perhaps someone can remind me.

Thoroughly enjoyed the film and can see why they split it into two films. I can't wait for part two.

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So the first 36 minutes of this has been leaked online. I couldn't resist temptation so had a look, and it's by far the darkest film so far. It's worked as a great teaser, I was planning to go and see it this weekend anyway, but I'll definitely be going now.

Is it even darker than Alien Versus Predators 2: Requiem?

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Yep, just got back myself. Glad to know that I'm not the only one sad enough to go to the 9.45am showing :)

OK, I'll set my stall out from the beginning, I'm a huge HP fan, so I am biased towards the 'world'. If you don't like HP thus far I don't see you coming round to it now. However...

...I have to say that it is the strongest film in the series. Prisoner of Azkaban has been my reflexive favourite because when it differed from the book you could see why and often it wasn't simply a quick-fix. The cuts, the extra scenes, all of it was handled sensitively and was wholly in keeping with Rowling's writing (the message is more important than the means and that is something Cuaron understood). It was also the darkest of the films, which have struggled to find their place due to various factors, not least because it is seen as a series of children's books and thus has been filmed that way at times (which is jarring).

Deathly Hallows is most definitely a dark film and pulls no punches. I was genuinely surprised at some of the content and if we went back a decade it would be a firm 12 rating. This is an empirically good thing: the last book is also the strongest for me and the broad themes it deals with are the big ones and it doesn't shy away from them. I won't spoiler anything because if anyone's tempted to read they'll probably not be as surprised and delighted as I was with some of the choices. Perhaps most importantly of all the book has been translated to script with nary an important moment missing and occasionally with some real, ahem, magic. You genuinely get a greater sense of an epic journey that has previously been sorely lacking.

I also have to say that in terms of art direction it has some fantastic moments. The camping scenes are necessary and were always going to be the hardest to translate to the big screen - it's such a book thing - but the lack of pace is tempered by some stunning photography, contrasting with the rest of the film which is fairly intimate and has an almost claustrophobic feel at times.

In terms of 'the rest', the usual excellent staples of the films are present: the 'adult' cast, the production values, the little graphic design type touches that really bring it all to life were very pleasing. The trio's acting has actually come on (surprisingly). None of them are going to win an Oscar but I didn't wince at all and I have to say I thought Emma Watson had some convincing moments! It's also pretty funny at times and much less self-aware.

It really felt to me that it had no corners cut in making it and I am really looking forward to the next one.

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In response to Tempy's post:

I would have thought that one of them would have acknowledged that Harry's cloak was one of the dealthy hallows. I haven't read the book since launch, so can't remember how this was handled. Perhaps someone can remind me.

In the book there is a lot of discussion about the veracity of said Hallows and Hermione flat-out believes to refuse that any of them exist. It's only a little later on when talking about the physical properties of the cloak that it is noted that it may be one of the Hallows, especially when 2 and 2 is put together and Harry realises that he is a Peverell. I doubt the latter will be explicitly mentioned in the next film but the cloak being one of the three Hallows is an important clue - it's on target/accurate so far.

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Thanks for reminding me of the points in the book Paradigm. I really need to revisit them. There is a nice link on Empire at the moment regarding book moments cut from the films. It reminded me of Azkaban and the meaning of prongs, wormtail etc not being mentioned in the movie which was a nice moment in the book, which I sadly missed from the film. Azkaban still just takes it as my favourite, although this is a very good film. I agree that it felt less corners were cut for this one.

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...I have to say that it is the strongest film in the series. Prisoner of Azkaban has been my reflexive favourite because when it differed from the book you could see why and often it wasn't simply a quick-fix. The cuts, the extra scenes, all of it was handled sensitively and was wholly in keeping with Rowling's writing (the message is more important than the means and that is something Cuaron understood).

That's probably the best recommendation I've seen yet. I also think the 3rd film was only one that came close to be a genuinely "good" film and captured the magic of the novels.

The last 2 were awful in my opinion and this new one is the same director, isn't it? Has he really improved that much he can rival Cuaron? :wacko:

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The last 2 were awful in my opinion and this new one is the same director, isn't it? Has he really improved that much he can rival Cuaron? :wacko:

It's a different film from Cuaron's so it's not a fair like-for-like comparison but my gut feeling was that there was less interference from people concerned with how commercial it would be. I think that and the ability to not have to cram everything in or lose plot strands makes a huge difference. Like I say, I felt Cuaron got the message across really well even though he was always pushed for time - the Lupin/Harry bridge scene always sticks out - and I felt that in DH there was a big emphasis on the darkness that is ever-present in the book. The more I ruminate about it the more I enjoyed it, I'll have to go see it again (which in itself is rare for me to do). It's probably Kloves' best screenplay so far as well.

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Half of my second least favourite book (behind 5, obviously) and I think the movies are generally terrible, but that was a fun enough way to spend a couple of hours. The Deathly Hallows CGI towards the end may be colouring my impression more favourably than deserved however.

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The Harry Potter magic died for me a long time ago. I enjoyed the first four books, the next three books not so much. Especially the last one. It took a huge effort to watch the last boring movie, and if they hadn't split this new one into two parts, I might have thought, "Well, I've seen six of these fuckers. Might as well go all the way!"

But another two movies? No thanks. I'll wait for the DVD. I guess they've got to squeeze that cash cow bone dry. Magical. Utterly magical.

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I did like this, it was pretty ambitious to spend so much time just on the characters in a kids film, and I think they did pretty well. The central trios acting was workmanlike but not jarring. The Deathy hallows sequence was ace - probably best bit of the film. Overall, I think they've done a good job of setting up the evil empire that the last movie is going to go out fight.

Maybe a little too long for my liking, think a bit of the camping could have been cut down.

Also randomly, couldn't help but think during the cafe scene that this was what nightwatch/day watch should have been like - brutal magic fights in a modern setting.

The more I think about it the more I like it.

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I didn't really enjoy this. I have never read any of the books, but seen all the films and at worst thought they were decent.

I thought the first 40mins or so were pretty good, but the middle just dragged and it never really recovered from it. I went it thinking there would be some pretty big revelations in this film, but was really disapointed by the lack of them. Over half the film just seemed rather pointeless to me.

Plus don't get me started on that headache inducing chase scene in the woods...

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Ironically, this had some of the best production of any of the films. They've nailed the tone and really gotten the most out of the actors. The problem for me is that the books themselves get worse and worse after the third, becoming more languid and rambling and clichéd. So, though they did a good job translating this to film (unlike 4/5/6 in my opinion) it was never going to transcend the poor source material. I thought the cinematography was great and there were some excellent sequences, whether action/horror/dramatic/humourous. However, as mentioned it suffers from the same poor pacing and plotting the book does. It's a shame because the film itself is really well constructed, it's the best since the third (which is the only genuinely excellent film in the whole series, and the best standalone book too). I suppose it's a testament to the film that they've made the second best film in the series out of the worst, least interesting, most rambling book. Or half of it, at least.

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There's also the issue that while the book is long and could be cut down, WB have to justify making two films so are probably extending or slowing down things that would otherwise have been cut or shortened if it were just a single film covering the whole book.

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Saw this yesterday as well and really enjoyed it. Like many of you it is one of my favourites of the films and again I'll cite Prisoner of Azkaban as my favourite until now. Not sure it'll top it as yet, mind. Great tone to it, and I was even glued to it during the slow camping bits (which bored me a bit in the books). It even made me jump once - I felt really tense throughout in fact, even though I knew the plot inside out. Compared to the last one, where I was bored pretty much the whole way through.

This film definitely adds to the book experience, whereas some of the other more recent efforts have just plodded their way through the story without much expansion for the big screen at all.

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One thing that I think is a massive shame is the alteration of

Ron's line after he's returned to the others that "Dumbledore must have known I would come back". The book's version, where Ron says "Dumbledore must have known I would leave" to which one of the others replies "no, he knew you would come back" is far more touching.

A small thing, but I don't see any good reason for the alteration.

I thought the film was lovely, I have to say, and much better than I thought it would be considering the last two efforts.

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Half of my second least favourite book (behind 5, obviously) and I think the movies are generally terrible, but that was a fun enough way to spend a couple of hours. The Deathly Hallows CGI towards the end may be colouring my impression more favourably than deserved however.

That for me was a low point. In still images, I would have really liked that bit of CGI, but I thought in motion some bits of it were really ropey. I know it was meant to look like a shadow puppet play, so the movement should be a bit wooden, but I felt that in some parts it did "move" like CGI, not like puppets. I loved the design of it; just not the execution.

Blobcat also thought the house elves looked a bit poor too; they seemed a bit low-contrast and washed out.

Don't want to be negative though; we both liked the film so we'll post some more favourable stuff later.

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It was pretty good up until to the bit in the ministry, and then they spent the entire rest of the film camping and pouting. I lost count of the number of times they sleepwalked into danger and then Neo'd out of it. It's like a fantasy quest novel but with no destination.

Couldn't Dumbledore have just left Harry instructions on how to beat Voldorf on the back of a beer mat or something, and then we could have got on to the fun wizards killing other wizards part quicker?

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Still, Emma Watson though, amirite

The-gangs-all-here....-Harry-Ron-and-Hermione-in-a-scene-from-Harry-Potter-and-the-Deathly-Hallows-Part-I..jpg

Once question - why didn't they

apparate when caught by the snatchers? I mean, they waited all the way until they got bundled in a magical antiapparating room before the idea occured to them.

Did anyone else find Ron's worst fear really, really funny?

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