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The Witcher 2 - 360 Footage - Post #1674


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  • 2 years later...

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;)

 

I snagged a free version of this for the 360 way back. I have played it before, at launch on 360 (I actually reviewed it for BritXbox, but the review got lost in a server crash), and really enjoyed it. But it's been over a decade. You know what? Even on 360 BC this is still impressive. Clearly fucking way ahead of its time, with only the Mass Effect series in the same league for storytelling during the last gen. 

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I'd almost forgotten how much shorter this game is than 3. Still, this remains a great game in its own right. For this playthrough I:

 

  • Went with Iorveth at the end of Flotsam - Roche is a colossal twat, and his blue stripes unit are just rapists and thugs. It still amazes me people in this thread big up a Roche as a "bro" like Garrus in Mass Effect. Lolwut!! :lol:
     
  • Went off to help Philippa Eilhart "rescue" Saskia, at the expense of potentially leaving Triss behind. I liked Vergen, and liked Upper Aedirn's lofty ideals. Besides, Yennefer is Geralt's true love, not Triss. ;)
     
  • Let Letho go - but only really because I know he turns up in W3 if you do. 

As for everything else in the game, I'd forgotten all about Radovid's involvement in the final chapter. The end of this game really does lead into Witcher 3 nicely: Redania marching on Temeria, the burning of magic folk, the looming threat of Nilfgaard, and Geralt heading toward Nilfgaard in search of Yennefer. 

 

Time to fire up 3 for another playthrough. :)

 

edit: I'd also forgotten about the post-credits scene. :)

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19 hours ago, Thor said:

I'd almost forgotten how much shorter this game is than 3. Still, this remains a great game in its own right. For this playthrough I:

 

  • Went with Iorveth at the end of Flotsam - Roche is a colossal twat, and his blue stripes unit are just rapists and thugs. It still amazes me people in this thread big up a Roche as a "bro" like Garrus in Mass Effect. Lolwut!! :lol:
     
  • Went off to help Philippa Eilhart "rescue" Saskia, at the expense of potentially leaving Triss behind. I liked Vergen, and liked Upper Aedirn's lofty ideals. Besides, Yennefer is Geralt's true love, not Triss. ;)
     
  • Let Letho go - but only really because I know he turns up in W3 if you do. 

As for everything else in the game, I'd forgotten all about Radovid's involvement in the final chapter. The end of this game really does lead into Witcher 3 nicely: Redania marching on Temeria, the burning of magic folk, the looming threat of Nilfgaard, and Geralt heading toward Nilfgaard in search of Yennefer. 

 

Time to fire up 3 for another playthrough. :)

 

edit: I'd also forgotten about the post-credits scene. :)

 

That came with the extended version and if I remember correctly it shows the Black Ones crossing the Yaruga?

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2 minutes ago, Thor said:

Correct. But the console versions all had that from the start, including the awesome intro showing Letho killing Demavend. I think it's Demavend. 

 

Ah, yes, consoles got the extended one straight away. I haven't played it in a console. How does it look with the BC? Any better anti aliasing, etc?

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  • 1 year later...

Cross post from the 2020 completions...

 

So staying with the cutting edge of PC gaming I turn to a game from um 2011.  Funny thing I have owned/sort of rented (hello Gamepass) at least 3 copies of The Witcher 3, but somewhere along the line I decided I should play this first (boring story - I bought the original PS4 release and didn't get around to it, bought the GOTY version for PC along with this and the first game and it also turned up and indeed left Gamepass whilst I was a subscriber).

 

Anyway back to the matter in hand, I picked up the entire Witcher trilogy shortly after getting my new PC at some point last year for largely buttons (maybe a tenner something like that) having been interested in playing them for well um sometime.  So some consultation of the internet later, it would appear that the first game is these days of somewhat academic interest only, but the second game still holds up and of course the third game remains seminal.  So I resolved I should play the second title first, at yeah some point in the future.

 

And so having recently spent 10 hours in the company of Henry Cavill and Netflix and thoroughly enjoyed the dark fantasy Game of Thrones vibes, I decided it was time to play this.  I was also encouraged to note that this second game was remarked upon for its brevity, which is always something I welcome as a time poor 40 something.

 

Well that last part lied - final game clock was about 44 hours and that was a simple play through without any thoughts of going back to play the second act from the other choice which is by all accounts almost entirely different.  Now some of that is probably down to the fact that The Witcher 2, and lets not beat around the bush here, bloody hard in places, particularly at the beginning where the game does it damnedest to put you off from going any further.  But yeah its not really a short game.

 

Now I must acknowledge that I am here playing the Enhanced Edition, with a prologue to the actual prologue where the game makes an attempt to explain its rather convoluted combat system to you by placing you in the shoes Geralt arriving at a village at midnight before entering an arena fight. Its all rather stilted and seemingly ridiculous complex, with a combat system that mixes real time hack and slash with slowing time down to choose magic spells and thrown weapons, oh and meditating to mix and take potions.

 

I didn't do very well in that opening section perhaps unsurprisingly and the game suggested I play on easy, but you know I spit on such suggestions so I adjusted back to normal as the actual prologue began.

 

And it really does begin as it means to go on.  Awaking by the shapely body of a red haired girl who turns out to be your mage girlfriend, you quickly walk out onto a field of an army preparing for war. And wow did this game really come out in 2011 because it still looks stunning?  That's a line that bears repeating throughout because whatever else you think of the game you can not deny that it remains a serious looker.

 

Anyway as the prologue rolls  you do come to realise that as awkward as the arena sequence was it does at least give you and idea how to play the game.  Without that I don't think I'd have a bloody clue as the game manifestly refuses to explain a great deal to you during what originally was the introduction to the game.

 

So anyway, I played the prologue linearly without too many issues (why would you play it out of order when you have only the faintest idea of what's going on, its fairly clear there is an order).  Having watched the TV show my early questions were where are Yennefer and Ciri?

 

Two questions the game largely fails to answer, having turned Geralt amnesiac at some point in advance of the point the television series is currently up to; all that became clear was that Yennefer was kidnapped by Wild Hunt (yeah dunno beyond spectral riders) at some point before Geralt lost his memory and Ciri, well fuck knows.  I also never got an answer as to why Foltest is so concerned about his illegitimate children as heirs when he has a daughter (an incestuous one with his sister mind) , that I saved from being a monster at some point in the past (actually why isn't she in contention to the throne following his death?).

 

Anyway then game rolls you through a prison break and into the first chapter and a medieval town in the middle of an elven LOTR forest.  And its at this point that you finally get to grips with it.  The fairly gentle pace of chapter 1 gets you used to the crafting and alchemy systems and teaches you that the combat system is built on dodging a lot. It also introduced some really neat side quests that force you to learn your abilities as a character (basically bombs are quite important against mobs of monsters), and also really trust no one. I played Geralt as a fundamentally trusting guy and lacking the prejudice humans but this on occasion blows up in his face (hello elf girl, really I should have killed you given you undoubtedly wanted to do that to me).

 

The combat system gradually develops from being seemingly impenetrable and tricky to actually being quite rewarding, tying directly in with your character levelling up and finally becoming somewhat capable.  It encourages you to throw every ability you have into the mix, mainly as leaping in just with your sword is a recipe to die swiftly.  The game has a rather strange XP system where the story quests give vast amounts of experience and everything else gives somewhat less so - to the extent that by chapter 3 my magic lead Geralt became pretty much unstoppable in a very short space of time  shortly afterwards the game ended, I could have done with a lot more time to play with the skills at the end of skill tree, mainly the with a separate charge bar that only became even vague relevant once I'd applied a couple more skills to charge it

 

Its also not terribly RPG like in that there is not a huge amount of gear around - each chapter basically has a couple of pieces of equipment (mainly armour or swords, my gloves and trousers remained very pedestrian throughout) that give you big leaps that you either find at the end of a quests or craft - pretty much everything else left on the ground is junk only good for sale.

 

I'm skipping around here, so its probably enough to say from the moment I killed the giant sea monster I was gripped and it just got better from there.  The combat goes from being awkward to being empowering once you have a few more vigours and level 2 spell casting skills.  There are plenty of awkward game changing decisions to make and the over arching plot gradually starts to make sense once you read around the various texts left strewn in the environment.  The events of the game all race to a satisfying if perhaps a little quick conclusion although that's more a reflection of the pace of chapters one and two compared to the concluding chapter.

 

Anyway in conclusion I thoroughly enjoyed myself and was satisfied with the spin I managed to place on events.  So quibbles time.  Weight limit, seriously this was just annoying - why give me lots of largely useless loot if I'm not going to be able to carry it - god knows what the game was like before you got storage.  The levelling is slow, slow, slow and then occasionally massively rapid.  I played all the side quests I could and it would have been nice to have some commiserate rewards  - you really don't get enough time to play with late game Geralt and at least one skill tree maxed, which is a shame because those last missions where I cut a bloody path though the Nilfguardian troops and battled a dragon where pure fantasy  power play.  That map is fcukijng awful.

 

Choices wise - I played it fairly simple as a good natured but impatient Witcher:

 

Spoiler

I killed Aryan because he wasn't for yielding easily and so you make your bed and lie in it

 

I let the elf girl go  twice despite her clearly being guilty and then trying to kill me to boot

 

I gave Ivoreth  his sword back because it was the right thing to do

 

But I sided with Roche because I owed him and to be honest Ivoreth is a bit of a dick, even if he's got the right cause.  Roche also might be a sociopath but he

's my sociopath.  And then there's  Vess too

 

I still went back to save Ivoreth because that was the right thing to do and my friend asked me to

 

I let Roche kill the king because he was a twat, a murderer and a rapist.

 

I saved Triss because that was why I was there to start with and well my Geralt is besotted with her and doesn't really owe Temeria anything

 

I let Sie get torn apart because that was more than she deserved

 

I don't kill dragons

 

I let Letho go too because we owe each other and to be honest I can see exactly where he was coming from

 

Bloody great game basically and now I'm itching to play the third one.

 

Game of Thrones / 10

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25 minutes ago, dreamylittledream said:

Two questions the game largely fails to answer, having turned Geralt amnesiac at some point in advance of the point the television series is currently up to; all that became clear was that Yennefer was kidnapped by Wild Hunt (yeah dunno beyond spectral riders) at some point before Geralt lost his memory and Ciri, well fuck knows.  I also never got an answer as to why Foltest is so concerned about his illegitimate children as heirs when he has a daughter (an incestuous one with his sister mind) , that I saved from being a monster at some point in the past (actually why isn't she in contention to the throne following his death?).

First point: the first season of the tv show is based on the first book in a series of 8 books total. The first Witcher videogame takes place AFTER the last book. What happened between the end of the books and the opening cutscene of the first game is what Geralt is trying to find out, since he lost his memory of those events. So Witcher 2 is set well after the season you've watched.

 

Second point: you've seen the exact events Foltest and Geralt are referring to! That's episode 3 of the TV show, his daughter was turned into a Striga, remember? In the first videogame she turned into a Striga a second time.

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I played Geralt as a fundamentally trusting guy and lacking the prejudice humans but this on occasion blows up in his face (hello elf girl, really I should have killed you given you undoubtedly wanted to do that to me).


 

i wonder what happens if you play as book Geralt: basically untrusting and disinterested with the exception of Ciri and getting his end away.

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7 hours ago, Mr. Gerbik said:

First point: the first season of the tv show is based on the first book in a series of 8 books total. The first Witcher videogame takes place AFTER the last book. What happened between the end of the books and the opening cutscene of the first game is what Geralt is trying to find out, since he lost his memory of those events. So Witcher 2 is set well after the season you've watched.

 

Second point: you've seen the exact events Foltest and Geralt are referring to! That's episode 3 of the TV show, his daughter was turned into a Striga, remember? In the first videogame she turned into a Striga a second time.


Yeah I understood that the game is set some time after the show, but it is somewhat confusing to be missing 2 of the show/books central characters; Ciri is basically not mentioned at all, apart from a couple of passing references. Is Geralt supposed to have forgotten about her? 

 

So Foltest’s daughter turned back into a monster again in the first game and that’s why she’s not available to be his heir? Well I suppose that makes sense

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41 minutes ago, dreamylittledream said:


Yeah I understood that the game is set some time after the show, but it is somewhat confusing to be missing 2 of the show/books central characters; Ciri is basically not mentioned at all, apart from a couple of passing references. Is Geralt supposed to have forgotten about her? 

 

So Foltest’s daughter turned back into a monster again in the first game and that’s why she’s not available to be his heir? Well I suppose that makes sense

The first game opens with Geralt having lost his memory because that's also a means to explain the backstory and setting to players who aren't familiar with the books. As Geralt pieces everything together, so does the player. You don't need to have read the books to enjoy the games, but Witcher 2 does assume you're familiar with the plot of the first game - it's a direct sequel. I suspect the questions you have are from having skipped the first game - but it's been so long that I can't recall. If you're curious, the Wikipedia entry summarizes the plot.

 

What I remember is that something happened between Geralt and the Wild Hunt, which relates to his return and amnesia. And also has to do with Yennefer's disappearance. But the mystery isn't fully explained until The Witcher 3 where you finally track down Yennefer and confront The Wild Hunt.

 

The open cutscene is worth watching because it retells the famous story of the Striga from the books. Having watched the show, it's fun to see that the makers of that episode had obviously seen this cutscene (also Henry Cavill basically does videogame Geralt):

 

Plot from the Wikipedia page spoilered for length:

Spoiler

The game tells the story of Geralt of Rivia, a witcher – a genetically enhanced human with special powers trained to slay monsters. The Witcher contains three different paths, which affect the game's storyline. These paths are: alliance with the Scoia'tael, a guerrilla freedom-fighting group of Elves and other non-humans; alliance with the Order of the Flaming Rose, whose knights protect the country of Temeria; or alliance with neither group to maintain "witcher neutrality".

 

In the game's opening cutscene, Geralt is tasked with curing Temeria's King Foltest's daughter, Princess Adda, of a curse that transforms her into a feral monster. Years later, a group of witchers find an amnesiac Geralt unconscious in a field and take him to the witcher stronghold of Kaer Morhen. As he struggles to recall his memories, the castle is attacked by a gang of bandits named the Salamandra. The witchers and sorceress Triss Merigold battle the invaders, but the mage Azar Javed and the assassin Professor escape with the mutagenic potions that genetically alter the witchers. The witchers head off in different directions to find information on the Salamandra.

Geralt looking over Vizima's dilapidated cemetery

Geralt heads south to Vizima, capital of Temeria and where Foltest reigns. On the outskirts, he meets a magically gifted child called Alvin and learns that Vizima is in quarantine. To obtain a pass, Geralt defeats a hellhound plaguing the outskirts, but is arrested upon trying to enter Vizima. Geralt volunteers to kill a monster in the sewers in exchange for his freedom from jail and emerges in Vizima's Temple Quarter. With the help of a private investigator, Geralt pursues multiple leads on the Salamandra and witnesses rising tensions between the Order of the Flaming Rose and the Scoia'tael. After a confrontation with Azar Javed and the Professor, Geralt is knocked unconscious and saved by Triss, who invites him to a party of high-standing officials in Vizima's Trade Quarter. There, Geralt meets Princess Adda and gains several new leads on Salamandra's business front. As the Order and the Scoia'tael grow bolder in their efforts, Geralt finds out more about Alvin's powers and visions while taking down Salamandra drug operations.

 

 

Geralt finally assaults a Salamandra base in Vizima with the help of either the Order or the Scoia'tael and kills the Professor, but finds himself surrounded by royal guards after escaping. Adda, who has been forging royal edicts in Foltest's absence, declares that she must kill him to conceal her treachery before Triss teleports him to a village on the other side of Vizima Lake. Geralt and his friend Dandelion find some unsteady peace while taking care of Alvin, helping with problems surrounding an ill-fated wedding, and negotiating between the village and the inhabitants of an aquatic city. Eventually, however, the conflict between the Order and the Scoia'tael threatens the village, forcing Geralt to finally pick a side or make enemies of both factions. The scared Alvin mysteriously disappears in a flash, and Geralt and Dandelion decide to sail back to Vizima to end Salamandra.

Foltest finally returns and retakes control of his castle, but at the same time civil war has broken out. The Scoia'tael have caused an uprising, and the Order of the Flaming Rose has responded by killing non-humans with little concern. Depending on which side Geralt took in the previous battle, he must either help the knights or the elves in the battle or assist nurses in a field hospital. He also deals with Adda, who has suffered from a relapse of her curse, after which the grateful king discloses clues about Azar Javed's location. Storming the main Salamandra base with his allies, Geralt finally kills the evil mage, but is shocked to learn that the Grand Master of the Order of the Flaming Rose is the mastermind behind Salamandra's mutation program.

 

With most Knights of the Order and their mutants now entering open rebellion, the king again turns to Geralt with a contract to kill the Grand Master. Upon being confronted, the Grand Master tries to persuade Geralt of his "greater plan" to save humanity from prophecies of world-consuming ice. The skeptical Geralt is cast into an icy wasteland illusion by the Grand Master, who bears striking similarities to Alvin. Geralt successfully defeats him and is then approached by the King of the Wild Hunt in specter form, to collect the Grand Master's soul. The specter warns Geralt of the impending events or fights him and disappears, upon which Geralt murders the Grand Master and escapes the illusion. As Geralt eliminated the Grand Master, he notices that he has the same amulet as Alvin which confirms he was Alvin the whole time, he accidentally sends himself back in time due to his Elder Blood years before the events of the game. In the ending cut scene, a man with a witcher's vertical pupils attempts to assassinate Foltest. However, the assassin is thwarted by Geralt, leading directly into The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings.

 

Edit: also from what I recall Witcher 3 does a better job of keeping in mind that players might not be familiar with the first two games. It works better as a standalone than 2, but it does continue and conclude the saga of the first two. So I wouldn't worry about it and just enjoy 3.

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Henry Cavill is a bit of a dude. My wife recently showed me a video he put up on his Twitter of him building his latest fuck off mental cool PC. It took him hours. He's a big gamer which had a lot to do with him wanting to do The Witcher TV series.

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1 minute ago, Hanzo the Razor said:

Henry Cavill is a bit of a dude. My wife recently showed me a video he put up on his Twitter of him building his latest fuck off mental cool PC. It took him hours. He's a big gamer which had a lot to do with him wanting to do The Witcher TV series.

 

He has finished Witcher 3 a couple of times as well. :wub:

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The man nerds want to be and their wives want to be with. I wasn't convinced beforehand I admit, but seeing him doing videogame Geralt and how he interacts with Dandelion - I'm completely convinced. He's perfect for the role. Hope they're able to do all the books.

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11 minutes ago, Mr. Gerbik said:

The man nerds want to be and their wives want to be with. I wasn't convinced beforehand I admit, but seeing him doing videogame Geralt and how he interacts with Dandelion - I'm completely convinced. He's perfect for the role. Hope they're able to do all the books.

 

It is kind of unfair. You are not supposed to look like him while you spend huge amounts of time building your own pc or arguing about Witcher 3 quests. 

 

Stay out you Hollywood slackers.:blah:

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3 minutes ago, Mr. Gerbik said:

Lugging those heavy gaming PC cases around means most PC gamers look like that though.

 

Now that I think about it they don't game much anyway. Just keep switching cases, parts and looking at numbers. :D

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