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I half arsed some mead

got a 5ltr bottle of spring water, chucked in some cloves, orange in sections, breadmakers yeast and six jars of honey, shook it then replaced the lid with a balloon with a hole in it

believe it or not it came out great after 6 months, then bottled and left in the fridge to settle the must out of it

crazy

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm 4 days into brewing my first ever batch. Done nothing fancy, just followed the instructions on a kit job - Muntons Connoisseurs wheat beer.

I'm not expecting anything mind-blowing, if I end up with something recognisable as beer then I'll claim a victory. I'm really enjoying it though, and would really like to get into crafting something after a few beginner runs.

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So long as you sterilised everything, can keep a fairly steady temperature, and put the right amount of sugar in the bottles, you ought to be fine. In my experience, the longer you can bottle condition for the better. Last week I had the last bottle of a beer I brewed a couple of years ago and it was really, really nice. That was from a kit.

Having said that though, I tend to wait a month or so before starting to drink it. Two years is not the normal ageing time I go for!

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Home brewing is pretty amazingly easy, the only awkward part is knowing to leave the fucking thing alone and not worry about it. We've been doing this for 6,000 years, so long as you sterilise properly and read the instructions you'll have a tasty beverage at the end.

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I was sitting in zerodegrees in Bristol (excellent microbrewery / restaurant) at the weekend listening to some guy on the table opposite blathering on about the creation of beer and how it is such large undertaking that needs talent and experience.

I'm not sure what he based this on. I'm on my 7th All grain brew and haven't brewed one single dud. They have all been beers that I will gladly drink and pass onto others knowing that they will enjoy them. I think the main requirement of brewing is patience and diligence. Recipes are easy to find and as long as you follow a proven method (and sterilise!) then I think it is really hard to fail.

Drinking my 7th at the moment which is a Blonde Ale hopped with belma and multihead hops (they were at a discount from maltmiller.co.uk highly recommended service). These hops give a nice citrus flavour which does border on the orangey side so it has made the perfect refreshing summer brew.

This was my first go at maxi-BIAB. Managed to get 38 bottles at a slightly lower than expected ABV of 3.9%, think I need to calibrate my fermenter for future use. Quite happy with how it turned out will definitely be trying it again.

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Yes, I went for a day at a brewery, and made beer that will be sold on actual shelves. If the brewer is confident enough to let someone he has never met or heard of make his beer, I think we can discount talent a little. Developing the beers from scratch in a commercial brewery must take a bit of talent though, I'd have thought.

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Why haven't I seen this thread before?

I've been brewing for about a year and I've got a few beer and wine kits under my belt (some basic reds and a strawberry). I've also done a couple of different strong, but rough ciders from scratch, as well as a mead I'm pretty proud of. I'm currently brewing some rhubarb wine from a recipe I've heard great things of.

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Yeah, I use a teaspoon per bottle. Or 1.25 if I'm feeling fizzy. Sometimes there are accidents when opening with that much sugar though.

I've got an alcoholic ginger beer going at the moment. I've made it before to put into a pressure barrel, and it was great, but very fizzy. I'm going to bottle it this time, and I'm a bit concerned about bottle bombs.

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I've found the better way for priming is to add a sugar solution to a secondary bucket (bottling bucket) and then add your brew to that.

For example, boil up 100g sugar in about 200ml water per 20 litres of beer. Add this to an empty sterilised fermenting bucket (mine has a 'Little Bottler' attached to it - best bit of bottling kit ever). Then syphon your beer into the bottling bucket leaving all the sediment behind, place the lid on and give it a gentle rock to ensure the sugar solution is mixed well (optional).

Much quicker and less faff than adding a spoon of sugar to each bottle. Never had a duff bottle.

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Bottled my stuff a couple of nights ago, just using a half teaspoon-ish of regular sugar.

I kinda tasted the beer while I was siphoning it out of the vat, and it basically tasted like weak beer. Hopefully the bottling will do something to the taste.

As an 'experiment' I put a teaspoon and a half of sugar in one of the bottles, and then filled it to the brim before capping it.

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I don't mind organising a postal bottle swap... As Long as everyone is happy to pay for there own p&p then I'll do the rest... Who's in?

Reckon we send at the start of October, that gives everyone time to get brews sorted etc.

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In theory so would I, but having just taken a gravity reading of my ginger beer (0.996! 6% in less than a week!) and tasted it, I wouldn't send any of you a bottle of it. I may not even bother bottling at all, and just heave it all straight down the drain. It's FOUL.

It's fiery enough, but you can hardly taste any ginger and it's got a horrible sour tang (not in a good way. I really like sour things, but this tastes wrong).

No idea what happened as I've made this twice before, to the same recipe, and it was lovely both previous times.

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