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Star Wars: Force Unleashed 2


The Sarge
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Wait a tick, I don't get this at all...

The last game had two endings, didn't it? One was supposedly canon, where the apprentice sacrificed his life to let the original members of the alliance escape, and the other was non-canon, where he kills Vader and Palpatine and becomes the new emperor? (I've not actually seen the second one mind).

So is this not actually a sequel? Is it a re-imagining or something? How do the events in that trailer reconcile with the original game? And Vader having loads of Starkiller clones; does that make any sense whatsoever?

I think it probably ties in with the canon ending. The starkiller you play as will be one of those clones presumably. That or some unexplained or crappily reasoned plotpoint for how he actually survived.. though I forget how they killed him off and if thats even possible!

Very swish trailer. (as was that glorious KOTOR one). I look forward to seeing the actual game itself but am expecting pretty much the same game as the first which for me was beautiful to look at and had a great atmosphere but just couldnt satisfy me in the combat department!

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I completed the previous game (I still own it :facepalm: ), and saw both endings.

The canon one

is where he beats Vader, then takes on the Emperor and beats him(who needs Luke!), only for that blind Jedi guy telling him not to kill him so ole Palpy uses force lightning on the blind spaz, forcing Starkiller to protect him and the rebels so they can flee, but dies doing so. Thats why the rebels choose Starkillers house sybol (house symbol? lol) as the rebel alliance's sybol (the one we all know).

The non canon one

is the one where you kill Vader and the Emperor beats you and kills the rebels, making you a robotic agent or some rubbish. I think the addons for the 1st game use this ending to continue the game, though quite how the rebels are on Hoth etc is beyond me as they were more or less destroyed in the non canon ending :(

So basically the 2nd game should be that your a clone, but I'm guessing they'll have brought you back to life or something using some technology that Boba Fett would love I'm sure, but Vader makes you think your a clone. Maybe. Or something stupid like that.

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The guy who played Starkiller also played Doomsday in Smallville

Ah, I thought he looked familiar.

Anyway, as big a Star Wars fan as I am, even I'm dubious about this. I mean

The Force Unleashed II opens with the familiar opening crawl and Lord Vader heading towards Kamino, the planet responsible for the Clone Troopers seen in Episode II. Starkiller is being held there in chains, his memory fractured, with only flashes of his past remaining; glimpses of Juno Eclipse haunt him. “Vader explains to him that he’s a failed clone and that he’s using an accelerated process here on Kamino that allows him to grow these clones in a matter of months. Unfortunately, that process has a lot of side effects and it drives subjects insane. This is something, actually, from the greater continuity we’ve pulled in,” Blackman continues, perhaps justifying the setup.

That's never been mentioned before. The Clones were accelerated, and they still took years to grow. If you read the books, I'm sure I read that some cloners can churn them out in a couple of years, but that they're shite. Months? Ho hum.

I know SW isn't meant to be terribly serious and it falls apart as soon as you scrutinise it, but still. There must be a billion different things they could make a SW game of, and they choose to half arse a sequel.

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After Order 66 was issued cloning was moved away from the Kaminoans (Vader having a facility there kinda makes no sense) as Palps setup his own cloning facility and could churn out clones in just a couple of years but they were a bit shit and behaved like children and were just mentally reatarded, it talks about it in the first Imperial commando book. This is why they moved away to recruiting in the end because the clones were becoming unstable and the ones they made themselves were pretty poor versions of the original clones.

I can also remember something about clones being fucked when it comes to using force abilities and even being felt in the force but I may be wrong about that.

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After Order 66 was issued cloning was moved away from the Kaminoans (Vader having a facility there kinda makes no sense) as Palps setup his own cloning facility and could churn out clones in just a couple of years but they were a bit shit and behaved like children and were just mentally reatarded, it talks about it in the first Imperial commando book. This is why they moved away to recruiting in the end because the clones were becoming unstable and the ones they made themselves were pretty poor versions of the original clones.

I can also remember something about clones being fucked when it comes to using force abilities and even being felt in the force but I may be wrong about that.

I think that's all an attempt to gradually bridge the events in Attack of the Clones to the Spaarti clones that are revealed in the Heir to the Empire trilogy by Timothy Zahn. Those books were written before Lucas had fully decided what the Clone Wars were about, so Zahn had to make up his own stuff, which contradicts a lot of things in the prequels.

In Zahn's though, the Spaarti clones mature quickly, but they're not very smart. They also affect people's use of the force as their identical consciousnesses create what Luke describes as a "resonant buzzing" that makes force users feel like their head is about to crack open.

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The first was a terrible game and yet reviewed pretty decently. It lacked anything like a tactile feeling of power, and the controls were shit house.

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Gameplay Footage & IGN Preview

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http://uk.ps3.ign.com/dor/objects/55056/st...d=1fsf82r4ldw2x

The Force Unleashed 2 looks beautiful -- the weather effects on the planet Kamino really add ambience -- but this is largely the same demo I saw for the impressions I wrote a few weeks ago. Starkiller, the protagonist from the first game who returns for the sequel, is escaping a secret cloning facility and fighting wave after wave of Republic troops. Still, as I watch the player run into his third group of Stormtroopers I immediately notice one major change: limbs are flying.

Dismemberment is something players have been asking for since the original game -- something several of you commented that you wanted when you read the last story -- and whose inclusion is telling about TFU2's entire design philosophy. LucasArts knows that many of you enjoyed the original, but they also know that they have to step it up this time around, making the player feel even more empowered than ever.

Giving the player greater power comes from more than just a lightsaber that acts like a lightsaber, though, as Force powers have also been changed. Along with the addition of new powers like Mind Trick -- which can make enemies attack each other or simply kill themselves -- players now have the ability to use Force Fury periodically. This overcharges Starkiller's Force powers, taking his powers to levels that players would normally have to wait until the end of the game to see. It's only a temporary charge, though, so players will have to use the ability at key moments, such as when you're up against considerable opposition (in the demo Starkiller used it to quickly dispatch to giant armored vehicles). It's still unclear how Force Fury will charge, but it was indicated to me that it will only be usable a few times during each stage.

Force Fury looks like it could make combat more satisfying for short periods of time, but TFU2 team has reworked the types of enemies you fight as well in order to make strategy more diverse than a button mashing affair where you just spam a single Force ability. TFU2 has far fewer enemy types than the first game, but they've all been designed in ways that the team hopes will force players to use different tactics. For instance, in the demo Starkiller had to face off against a Carbonite Heavy -- a giant droid with a lightsaber resistant shield and the ability to freeze the player -- which made the player have to find a way to remove the droid's shield. Once the shield was gone the player could pick how to kill the droid, using his own shield to smash him or attacking him now that he was vulnerable. It still looks like there are plenty of random troopers to slice up and toss with ease (a necessary thing to keep the player feeling empowered), but I could see how more specialized troops such as the one they showed could really mix things up when they were combined in later levels.

Empowerment also comes in TFU2 from the return of the crazy physics engine mash-up that the first was known for. Using a combination of physics engines that have a series of pretty names, the end result is a game where both enemies and the environment react in a more realistic manner. Pick up an enemy with Force grab and he'll wave his limbs around frantically, reaching for purpose on boxes, friends or ledges in the world (which they'll sometimes find at times dragging an ally to their doom). The environment also smashes where appropriate, bending the way you'd expect it to if it's thick metal, or shattering into pieces if it's a more brittle substance. I'd love to see lightsabers used as a cutting tool more often, but the way the Force powers affect the world around you is still as impressive as ever.

With a demo promised to be coming around a month before the game goes to retailers (the game has a hard release date of October 26, 2010), it's obvious that the team has confidence in what they're doing with TFU2. Hopefully as the game gets closer to release I'll finally get to cut some soldiers to pieces myself, or get to see some of the other worlds Starkiller will get to visit, but what I've seen so far makes me hopeful that this time the player will finally feel like they really are, well, unleashed.

http://uk.ps3.ign.com/articles/109/1096589p1.html

<_<

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I think that's all an attempt to gradually bridge the events in Attack of the Clones to the Spaarti clones that are revealed in the Heir to the Empire trilogy by Timothy Zahn. Those books were written before Lucas had fully decided what the Clone Wars were about, so Zahn had to make up his own stuff, which contradicts a lot of things in the prequels.

In Zahn's though, the Spaarti clones mature quickly, but they're not very smart. They also affect people's use of the force as their identical consciousnesses create what Luke describes as a "resonant buzzing" that makes force users feel like their head is about to crack open.

I haven't read the Thrawn trilogy in about 12 years but that kinda jogs my memory.

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Just watched the trailer. Dual wield lightsabers? Sold.

I suppose this explains why there’s no robot troops left by the time of the original trilogy.. :P

CGI is REALLY nicely done though – that uncanny valley seems to actually be shrinking a little..

I’d much rather these guys or the guys that did the amazing intro for the Knights of the Old Republic MMO did new Star Wars stuff instead of Lucas…

Most of them seem to ‘get it’ much better than he does..

Though the prequels would at least explain why Vader is THAT stupid that he leaves him to be killed by Stormtroopers rather than doing it himself – especially as didn’t bother to confiscate his bloody lightsabers…

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Most Star Wars books are mediocre but there are a few that shine through.

Thrawn Trilogy

I, Jedi

Darth Bane trilogy

Republic commando series (some seem to hate these though)

New Jedi Order series (Yuuzhan Vong war)

X-wing series

And some that are so terrible they should be burnt and forgotten forever.

Anything by Barbara Hambly

Anything by Kevin J Anderson

Legacy if the force series (how to take a great character and turn him into a whining, emo, thick as shit waste of page space............Biggest disappointment ever in Star Wars literature)

Dark nest trilogy

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Most Star Wars books are mediocre but there are a few that shine through.

Thrawn Trilogy

I, Jedi

They are most excellent, as are the Two Thrawn Novels that Zahan wrote to bookend the first trilogy. Most of the rest were pish though.

Anybody played/got the Wii version of the first game. Tempted to pick it up cheap but is it any good without the 360/PS3 visual power ?

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So I'm guessing there's no like, uber approval process or anything? Does George Lucas do anything these days, like at all? That F-Zero Lightsabres-on-his-fucking-knees Guy, for instance, is he considered canon? I've never really experienced anything Star Wars beyond the films and Jedi Outcast or whatever, but to me it seems a bit weird that there's no bible or strict guidelines etc. Maybe that's seen as a good thing? Just curious is all :)

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So I'm guessing there's no like, uber approval process or anything? Does George Lucas do anything these days, like at all? That F-Zero Lightsabres-on-his-fucking-knees Guy, for instance, is he considered canon? I've never really experienced anything Star Wars beyond the films and Jedi Outcast or whatever, but to me it seems a bit weird that there's no bible or strict guidelines etc. Maybe that's seen as a good thing? Just curious is all :)

People could pretty much get away with writing whatever they liked up until about 5 or 6 years ago when Sue Rostini took over publishing the books and they started reigning in all the OTT stupid shit and planned out book releases and stories years in advance of so they'd have no contradictions and could keep jedi abilities in check.

When Rostini took over she also got Lucas onboard to go over outlines of the stories to see if he had anything to add or take away.

Saying all that Lucas gave Karren Traviss the nod to write the Republic Commando series to flesh out the history behind the troopers and also to start building the Mandalorian culture and history as pure canon which I think she did excellently. Just after she released the 5th book Lucas went and shit on everything she did by making a Clone Wars 3 episode arc featuring Mandos which were the total opposite of what Traviss had built up and she's now quit writing novels for Lucas because Lucas just made her last 7 or 8 years of work utterly pointless.

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So I'm guessing there's no like, uber approval process or anything? Does George Lucas do anything these days, like at all? That F-Zero Lightsabres-on-his-fucking-knees Guy, for instance, is he considered canon? I've never really experienced anything Star Wars beyond the films and Jedi Outcast or whatever, but to me it seems a bit weird that there's no bible or strict guidelines etc. Maybe that's seen as a good thing? Just curious is all :)

It's complex. There are several "degrees" of canon, I think. I'm not 100% sure, as I'm not a massively hardcore fan. I do know that the top level of the canon is called "G-Canon", which is solely stuff that was created by George Lucas (so the 6 films). Then it gradually works its way down to the bottom, which is only just canon, then you have stuff that is either absolutely not canon or follows its own rules (like Star Wars Infinity).

There's actually someone employed by Lucasfilm who's official job title is "The Keeper of the Holocron" who has the job of tracking all this stuff, and making the final say on what degree of canon each work is.

This has all come about because of two things; first off, the prequel movies rewriting stuff that has been in the expanded universe since the early 90s, and secondly, the varying nature of the quality of the Star Wars Expanded Universe.

Most Star Wars books are mediocre but there are a few that shine through.

Thrawn Trilogy

I, Jedi

Darth Bane trilogy

Republic commando series (some seem to hate these though)

New Jedi Order series (Yuuzhan Vong war)

X-wing series

Shadows of the Empire

Added in Shadows of the Empire there, as I always thought the book was pretty good. It definitely still had the "feel" of a Star Wars movie, and Xizor was a decent villain. Can't speak for the stuff in italics. One thing I should say though is, whilst I liked the X-Wing series, I only liked the first four (that were written by Michael Stackpole. I think it was Rogue Squadron, Wedge's Gamble, The Bacta War and The Krytos Trap. Other authors would go on to continue the series (whereas one of the characters in the X-Wing series is the main character in I, Jedi, which is sort-of the continuation of the saga).

And some that are so terrible they should be burnt and forgotten forever.

Anything by Barbara Hambly

Anything by Kevin J Anderson

Legacy if the force series (how to take a great character and turn him into a whining, emo, thick as shit waste of page space............Biggest disappointment ever in Star Wars literature)

Dark nest trilogy

Second what I've bolded, there. I read Darksaber once... Dreadful. I actually got a Kevin J Anderson X-Files book once (it was a big hardback as an Xmas present, presumably bought from a discount bookstore) and honestly, the guy just writes whatever he wants regardless of what fictional universe he's in. No matter which of his books you read, it's always "a Kevin J. Anderson book".

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