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Have They Broken Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?


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1 hour ago, Majora said:

I think you are greatly, greatly overestimating the breadth of most people's movie knowledge. Especially when it comes to what type of horror certain directors specialised in.

 

I don't think i am really, especially in comparison to Pointless where (and i watch it very rarely) name a pointless film of an actor takes a lot of thinking to go through their filmography. And as Jake Gyllenhaal shows there are apparently people on the streets of England who can name his early obscure films. I would have been content in thinking that Bubble Boy would be a good guess, and that maybe a handful would get Donnie Darko if we just expect ordinary folk to not watch films considered 'cult' even if it's one of his big films. And some out there must have watched Love and Other Drugs. 

 

Who Wants To Be A Millionaire isn't even asking for people to dredge up some long forgotten film 278 people have ever watched, but go through a logical process of elimination. The person in the seat didn't even do that. I don't think it's something where you either know it or you don't.

 

That Finding Nemo question should have been at most the £1000 question surely. It's not like 'What was the 8th film of this well known director'. Surely everyone in society has some awareness of two of Pixar's biggest hits without having seen them. Just recalling any clips, adverts, posters. It's not like 'Who voiced Dory'. Pop culture questions you're always drawing on vague stuff you pick up, i just expect films to filter through more. 

 

What next? What colour is Mike in Monsters Inc? Oh god which one was Mike etc. Actually there was also another Pixar question that was around £4000, in Up what was the house attached to that gave it flight? The person knew that one though but only just. In Ratatouille what rodent likes to cook? Is it A mouse, B rat, C squirrel or D hamster. 

 

I do consider film to be THE shared medium/culture of the world, not like books or music where people delve into their own tastes. Generally, i think if there are big notable films (like say Get Out that had big word of mouth, made loads of money and won an Oscar) then i expect everyone to be familiar with them and try to watch them eventually. There is a sense with films and tv shows mainly of shared experiences, socially excluded until you watch what everyone else is watching. 

 

There was another question about Argo which given it won the oscar everyone expects it to turn up in quizzes in 15 years anyway. Can't remember the question exactly, i only remember Clarkson was sure Ben Affleck directed Good Will Hunting which annoyed me because everyone knows he only co wrote it right right??? His whole career arc was one off writer, actor, Gigli, exile, director. Everyone is familiar with that.

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5 minutes ago, Death's Head said:

I almost always get Harry Potter questions right on tv quizzes, despite having read none of the books or seen any of the films. Its surprising what you can pick up just by cultural osmosis.

 

Exactly! I've not seen any of the Harry Potter films. When they're on tv i watch a few minutes then turn over. Ask me a question! Someone ask me a question! What particular scar does Harry have perhaps? I know that! I've seen the clips! If you ask me what monster they fight half way through the 3rd film though I'm lost. 

 

Also why do i write a billion words when i could just say 'Its surprising what you can pick up just by cultural osmosis'

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14 minutes ago, Loik V credern said:

 

I don't think i am really, especially in comparison to Pointless where (and i watch it very rarely) name a pointless film of an actor takes a lot of thinking to go through their filmography. And as Jake Gyllenhaal shows there are apparently people on the streets of England who can name his early obscure films. I would have been content in thinking that Bubble Boy would be a good guess, and that maybe a handful would get Donnie Darko if we just expect ordinary folk to not watch films considered 'cult' even if it's one of his big films. And some out there must have watched Love and Other Drugs. 

 

Who Wants To Be A Millionaire isn't even asking for people to dredge up some long forgotten film 278 people have ever watched, but go through a logical process of elimination. The person in the seat didn't even do that. I don't think it's something where you either know it or you don't.

 

That Finding Nemo question should have been at most the £1000 question surely. It's not like 'What was the 8th film of this well known director'. Surely everyone in society has some awareness of two of Pixar's biggest hits without having seen them. Just recalling any clips, adverts, posters. It's not like 'Who voiced Dory'. Pop culture questions you're always drawing on vague stuff you pick up, i just expect films to filter through more. 

 

What next? What colour is Mike in Monsters Inc? Oh god which one was Mike etc. Actually there was also another Pixar question that was around £4000, in Up what was the house attached to that gave it flight? The person knew that one though but only just. In Ratatouille what rodent likes to cook? Is it A mouse, B rat, C squirrel or D hamster. 

 

I do consider film to be THE shared medium/culture of the world, not like books or music where people delve into their own tastes. Generally, i think if there are big notable films (like say Get Out that had big word of mouth, made loads of money and won an Oscar) then i expect everyone to be familiar with them and try to watch them eventually. There is a sense with films and tv shows mainly of shared experiences, socially excluded until you watch what everyone else is watching. 

 

There was another question about Argo which given it won the oscar everyone expects it to turn up in quizzes in 15 years anyway. Can't remember the question exactly, i only remember Clarkson was sure Ben Affleck directed Good Will Hunting which annoyed me because everyone knows he only co wrote it right right??? His whole career arc was one off writer, actor, Gigli, exile, director. Everyone is familiar with that.

That's a pretty myopic take on knowledge and personal interest though. 

 

I mean, if I was on a quiz show and any question came up about soaps, I wouldn't have a clue. Zero interest in them. As some of the most popular cultural products out there, millions would be on their sofas shouting at me and saying I'm thick. But I genuinely don't know a Barlow from a Mitchell. They're just not part of my cultural landscape.  You can see this writ large in the 'stupid things other people say' thread on here; some of the brightest folks you know have no understanding or knowledge of Harry Potter, football, Taylor Swift, the Marvel universe etc. Their faux paux seem stupid to us; however, my cursory knowledge of Eastenders or Call the Midwife probably makes me ripe for a stupid comment for two. 

 

I disagree with your point about films as well. People delve into genres all the time in regards to films. I know lots of people who won't watch sci-fi or horror or rom-coms etc. Expecting everyone to be familiar with a film is totally unrealistic - take Parasite for instance. Won the best film Oscar; millions won't touch it because it has subtitles. We have a thread on Titanic that proves this point too. 

 

 

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54 minutes ago, Loik V credern said:

in comparison to Pointless where (and i watch it very rarely) name a pointless film of an actor takes a lot of thinking to go through their filmography. And as Jake Gyllenhaal shows there are apparently people on the streets of England who can name his early obscure films.

 

The scoring in Pointless shows incredible variation, all depending on that very small sample of 100 people that answered the question. Get one single Jake Gyllenhaal fan by accident and suddenly most stuff is going to pick up a mention as they reel off everything they know, massively distorting the scoring.

 

Contrast it with the time they had a round featuring anagrams of panel shows and the question "IQ" only scored 90.

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1 hour ago, Fry Crayola said:

 

The scoring in Pointless shows incredible variation, all depending on that very small sample of 100 people that answered the question. Get one single Jake Gyllenhaal fan by accident and suddenly most stuff is going to pick up a mention as they reel off everything they know, massively distorting the scoring.

 

Contrast it with the time they had a round featuring anagrams of panel shows and the question "IQ" only scored 90.

 

Yes. I remember one episode where they had the word "black" as the theme for the final round.  One of the three questions was "tracks from Metallica's black album" - I got 8 pointless answers as I know all the tracks as I played it to death back in the day.  That day, there weren't any Metallica fans in the audience obviously.

 

My current guilty pleasure is The Wall with Danny Dyer.  It's genuinely amazing.  I'm usually quite drunk when it comes on the TV though but I love it.  If you haven't seen it, Danny has a big wall.  The wall is basically a gigantic pachinko board and contestants answer questions in isolation to obtain balls that are dropped into slots that represent cash prizes.  Green ones win money, the red ones remove it.  The person not answering then decides where the balls should drop from.  The one answering the questions gets the final say on if they take the end total or the total half way through as they are given that information half way through the show.  It's actually quite cruel but Danny Dyer is amazing in it as he talks to the wall throughout.

"Don't mug me off wall!"

Angela Rippon asks the questions.

It's multiple choice. 

 

I really liked the Micheal Barrymore one but can't remember the name - you had to go along and pick top, middle or bottom to progress.  That and Bullseye were better than anything on these days.  

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I think the cruelest prizes these days are those radio ones where you have to answer the phone with some stupid phrase to win.

Imagine getting rung at 8am and you answer the phone half asleep "hello" and some twat roars at you "oh noo! that's not the phrase we wanted, I'm afraid you don't win the £10,000" <click> <brrrrrr>

Now how's that for a way to start your day. Imagine if your were in financial dire straits, and that happened. Surprised someone hasn't went straight into the garage and strung themselves up.

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3 hours ago, Stopharage said:

That's a pretty myopic take on knowledge and personal interest though. 

 

I mean, if I was on a quiz show and any question came up about soaps, I wouldn't have a clue. Zero interest in them. As some of the most popular cultural products out there, millions would be on their sofas shouting at me and saying I'm thick. But I genuinely don't know a Barlow from a Mitchell. They're just not part of my cultural landscape.  

 

Soaps aren't generally world renowned though, Meryl Streep films, Pixar, Cronenberg are. When a film or an actor or a director wins an oscar it's broadcast and reported around the world. There are loads of daytime and evening soaps, how many actresses are there who have had a 5 decade film career so good they've been nominated for an Oscar 20+ times? Streep is the biggest actress in the world. That doesn't mean someone could have seen all her films (even though the guy had seen 3) but the producers clearly thought that was a reasonable question given how famous and prominent she is for people to have a good idea of her films. The answer The Hours also had two of the other most prominent actresses Nicole Kidman and Julianne Moore in it, it won awards. 

 

How many animation studios are there where their releases gross $800m+? Pixar being the pioneers, the originators. I expect everyone to know Toy Story like i would Sonic The Hedgehog or Mario. Cronenberg is unique in film as David Lynch is. You don't have to have seen all their films, i haven't, just have a sense of who they are enough to narrow the question down. These people sat in the chair have age on their side who have lived through these decades of film. I wouldn't expect a teenager to know. 

 

You don't see the difference between asking what colour the main character of the fish is in 2 films that have grossed $2 billion in 2 different decades compared with, say asking who owned the pub in Eastenders between 2000 and 2007? Why would that information filter through? Who Wants To Be A Millionaire hasn't recently asked questions about soaps for this reason. 

 

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You can see this writ large in the 'stupid things other people say' thread on here; some of the brightest folks you know have no understanding or knowledge of Harry Potter, football, Taylor Swift, the Marvel universe etc. Their faux paux seem stupid to us; however, my cursory knowledge of Eastenders or Call the Midwife probably makes me ripe for a stupid comment for two. 

 

The film questions apply to decades, it's not just 'which song didn't appear on Taylor Swift's 2017 album'. The show doesn't ask football questions, only one recently about number of premier league winners. I think most people who don't even watch football can think; well i heard about Leicester being a miracle and Liverpool just last year after 30 years and who are the other big clubs? Then it's just Blackburn. 

 

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I disagree with your point about films as well. People delve into genres all the time in regards to films. I know lots of people who won't watch sci-fi or horror or rom-coms etc. Expecting everyone to be familiar with a film is totally unrealistic - take Parasite for instance. Won the best film Oscar; millions won't touch it because it has subtitles. We have a thread on Titanic that proves this point too. 

 

Not just any films, massively culturally relevant ones. Even those who haven't watched Titanic they are aware of it, they'll have seen the iconic moments, know it won loads of Oscars, know about who sung the song and will know Kate Winslet has red hair in it and not blonde or brown. 

 

If there is a broad question that comes up that is exactly that I'd expect everyone to know, i just would. Like i expect everyone to know The Simpsons. I don't care about those who never owned a tv and spent most of their time reading books in the decades the show was a cultural phenomenon, if Who Wants To Be A Millionaire asks what the baby in The Simpsons family is called i would expect them to know. It's not 'Who was Eddie mates with in Bottom? Was it...' I love Bottom, i wouldn't expect people to know. Family Guy is pretty big. I wouldn't expect everyone to know the name of the family dog. 

 

People have genres in film they particularly love but i think those who avoid genres altogether are rare. My parents in lockdown are watching a lot of Netflix and seem to watch any Scandinavian comedy subtitled show without a care for having to read to follow along or what genre it is. A lot of peoples usual objections are being too tired after work and wanting something light to bring them up, not down. We are social story telling creatures more than anything else, everyone likes a good story.

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1 hour ago, Loik V credern said:

Soaps aren't generally world renowned though, Meryl Streep films, Pixar, Cronenberg are. When a film or an actor or a director wins an oscar it's broadcast and reported around the world. There are loads of daytime and evening soaps, how many actresses are there who have had a 5 decade film career so good they've been nominated for an Oscar 20+ times? Streep is the biggest actress in the world. That doesn't mean someone could have seen all her films (even though the guy had seen 3) but the producers clearly thought that was a reasonable question given how famous and prominent she is for people to have a good idea of her films. The answer The Hours also had two of the other most prominent actresses Nicole Kidman and Julianne Moore in it, it won awards. 

I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. 

 

We're discussing quiz questions on UK TV. The fact Pixar is known world-wide is neither here not there. Soaps tend to have been around for ages and have huge terrestrial audience, consistent and vast media coverage and are part of the national psyche. My point is that for millions, knowledge of soaps is ingrained and for me not to be able to answer questions on them would be as alien to that audience as a lack of knowledge of Cronenberg is to you. 

 

I'm with @Majoraon this; I think you are vastly overestimating the film knowledge of the general public and then doubling down and stating that because Meryl Streep is known world-wide that somehow negates soaps cultural coverage. I know I'm crossing media types now but look at the amount of people that only pick up and play Fortnite and/or Call of Duty. Their breadth of gaming knowledge is minuscule and this populist consumer is the norm, not the folks like you and I that lap up Lynch and Cronenberg.

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Most people have heard of Meryl Streep I'm sure, but the question was very specific. Just because you're familiar with the name of an actor and have seen them in a few movies it doesn't mean you're au fait with their body of work. I bet I couldn't tell you anything about three-quarters of the movies she's been in.

 

I'm struggling to understand what point is being made here too, I think it really is just as simple as someone with a very above average knowledge of film not understanding that most people just do not take much interest in the specifics of a director's or actor's filmography. Hell, I would say that unless you're of the status of a Spielberg, a Cameron or a Nolan then a lot of people don't care who the director of a movie is period.

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1 hour ago, Majora said:

Most people have heard of Meryl Streep I'm sure, but the question was very specific. Just because you're familiar with the name of an actor and have seen them in a few movies it doesn't mean you're au fait with their body of work. I bet I couldn't tell you anything about three-quarters of the movies she's been in.

 

I'm struggling to understand what point is being made here too, I think it really is just as simple as someone with a very above average knowledge of film not understanding that most people just do not take much interest in the specifics of a director's or actor's filmography. Hell, I would say that unless you're of the status of a Spielberg, a Cameron or a Nolan then a lot of people don't care who the director of a movie is period.

 

Yep. I didn't know the Streep answer. I can tell you the number of movies in the MCU and the order on which they are released but I'm not up on my Steep knowledge. Its just the way things go. 

 

The Millionaire questions aren't difficult but you broadly either know them or you don't. And a lot of the times you have a gut feeling which is probably right but it is still a lot of money to risk. 

 

I can be watching it and can't believe that someone doesn't know one answer but then a question comes up about Henry 8th and they sail through and I have no idea. 

 

I'd bet a fair few people wouldn't even know that Christopher Nolan was a film director if you asked them. In the same way you could offer me a million quid to name the last England football team and I'd fail instantly but to a football fan they could name you the squad that played in 1980. It all depends on what you're interested in. 

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On 22/02/2021 at 16:14, Loik V credern said:

Again last night. In what film did Meryl Streep play a wholly fictional character? Out of Africa, The Hours, The Post, or Suffragettes. Guy's like; seen 3 of these, process of elimination. Out of Africa she played such and such..Suffragettes she played...The Post is based on real life. The Hours...The Hours is fictional! I've not seen it but...it is. Characters in real life stories can be composites but that's why the question includes 'wholly'. Anyway, he did 50 50 and phoned someone who didn't know and ended up picking The Hours and got £64,000 or about that. He knew the answer, they always know it when it comes to films but pretend they don't.

I've not seen any of those films but wouldn't have known the answer - I thought The Hours was about Virginia Woolf rather than being fictional?

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10 minutes ago, Halo said:

I've not seen any of those films but wouldn't have known the answer - I thought The Hours was about Virginia Woolf rather than being fictional?

 

Virgina Woolf is a character in the film but Streep’s part is fictional (and based on of one Woolf’s creations)

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13 hours ago, Loik V credern said:

I do consider film to be THE shared medium/culture of the world, not like books or music where people delve into their own tastes. Generally, i think if there are big notable films (like say Get Out that had big word of mouth, made loads of money and won an Oscar) then i expect everyone to be familiar with them and try to watch them eventually. There is a sense with films and tv shows mainly of shared experiences, socially excluded until you watch what everyone else is watching. 

 

 

I was going to post a more general response about how what you think is "general knowledge" isn't actually that at all. We all have our own interests, and things you think "everybody" should know, almost certainly are things that only some people would know, but sure - there's perhaps a common language and people pick up bits of culture that are outside of their focus of attention through shared media etc.

 

But then I read the bit quoted above.

 

I'll qualify this with a big - "I know I'm fucking strange in that I just do not buy into mainstream popular culture at all, and I absolutely do not care about being socially excluded". Also, my friends couldn't care less if I know about this stuff either, so exclusion isn't an issue. I think they like the fact that I'm very much not them.

 

So to cut to the chase, I've honestly never heard of Get Out. I've just had to google it to make sure it's a thing. I'm aware of plenty of other bits of pop culture that I know nothing about - La La Land, Adele, Ed Sheeran, whatever, but of this I know nothing. Saying it won an Oscar is the same as saying it won the America's Cup to me. I couldn't care less about either of those awards. (If it had somehow managed to win the Ashes I'd care.)

 

I'm not trying to be arch. I'm just saying it's entirely possible to have not even heard of this thing that you think everyone should have heard of. It's really not that hard (and frankly fucking liberating) to drop out of the popular culture you're expected to consume and just concentrate on the stuff you enjoy. If I stumble across stuff that appeals I'll watch it (I'm most of the way through Schitt's Creek at the moment, which is glorious), but I'm aware there are dozens of "must-watch" shows and films that I haven't watched, and have no interest in watching, even if I had the time. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Halo said:

I've not seen any of those films but wouldn't have known the answer - I thought The Hours was about Virginia Woolf rather than being fictional?

 

I have seen The Hours but I've forgotten almost everything about it, including which actress played which character, so when I read @Loik V credern's post I misremembered Streep as the one who played Woolf.

 

Maybe I was getting mixed up with Adaptation, another 2002 film in which Streep did play a real author. (Well, sort of real. Adaptation is kind of weird when it comes to deciding which bits can be described as "real" or "fictional".)

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Once the final question in Pointless was "works by Jeffrey Archer" and I didn't know any so I just made up three plausible-sounding titles, and one of them was actually real and a pointless answer. "The Accused". I was only watching at home sadly, if I'd actually been playing it would've been amazing.

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16 hours ago, Stopharage said:

I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. 

 

We're discussing quiz questions on UK TV. The fact Pixar is known world-wide is neither here not there. Soaps tend to have been around for ages and have huge terrestrial audience, consistent and vast media coverage and are part of the national psyche. My point is that for millions, knowledge of soaps is ingrained and for me not to be able to answer questions on them would be as alien to that audience as a lack of knowledge of Cronenberg is to you. 

 

I'd be amazed if i came across anyone in the uk who hasn't seen a Pixar film. Every age group watches them. When i went to see Up it was the only time at the cinema where there were a couple of older women sat beside me who were chuckling along throughout, as well as kids laughing at the front. Every seat was taken, it was the most memorable cinema experience because it showed how Pixar connected to every generation. And also because i couldn't stop laughing at the rope joke and i became worried I'd hit one of those laughing spirals i wouldn't be able to get out of.

 

Having read Mark's post i give up, I'll still carry on for a bit though. My only point was that these were not hard film questions and i still think that, not that everyone should know everything in the whole wide world. Questions where many thousands of pounds rest on figuring them out, questions where the answer appears on screen, questions where the wrong answers allow you to do a process of elimination.

 

Everyone is focusing on The Hours question - he'd seen 3 of the films! He ruled out Suffragettes and Out Of Africa! He used 50 50 and ended up with The Post or The Hours! Memory memory form attachments what attachments these most well known director in history is making new film oh piqued i must know simplify it pls Hanks Streep journalists real life story not unlike Oscar winning Spotlight ok that will do cheers memory that's logged now. Okay he would have lost £31,000 and wanted to be sure. 

 

Continuing with what's more prominent, the billion dollar making generation-crossing Pixar films or Eastenders, i don't think they ask questions about soaps anymore because of the choice available to people meaning they aren't a part of popular culture like there were in the 90s when Deirdre was going to jail or in the early 00s when Gail's husband was trying to kill her and her children for some reason. The only people who watch them are those who formed an attachment then and continue out of habit, because the characters are like family to them. Someone must watch Hollyoaks, i can't imagine 20 year olds picking it up but someone must do. 

 

I watched Who Wants to Be A Millionaire in the 90s, i don't recall film questions, it is a new inclusion because I'm surprised when they come up. 

 

Before you said you don't know a Barlow from Mitchell. You know enough to say those names, though right. I bet loads has filtered through. I bet you know Barlow is the longest running soap character in history, that Barbara Windsor owned the Eastenders pub and her two sons were bald. 

 

The Pixar question was only 'what colour was the fucking fish who was the main character in 2 films that made 2 billion'. It wasn't 'what was the squid called' or 'how many mates did Nemo have when he ended up in the dentist fish tank'. 

 

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I'm with @Majoraon this; I think you are vastly overestimating the film knowledge of the general public and then doubling down and stating that because Meryl Streep is known world-wide that somehow negates soaps cultural coverage. I know I'm crossing media types now but look at the amount of people that only pick up and play Fortnite and/or Call of Duty. Their breadth of gaming knowledge is minuscule and this populist consumer is the norm, not the folks like you and I that lap up Lynch and Cronenberg.

 

My point about Streep was that pop culture moves so fast that you can miss things. Streep's name has been mentioned every year for 4 decades, people might not have seen her films but know of her. It was a fair question. It is not comparable to asking which doctor died suddenly on Casualty last year, it's not, hence why they don't ask those questions. Soaps have fallen in their cultural significance. Clearly the producers thought Cronenberg and The Fly was culturally significant enough that it was reasonable and not so obscure no contestant could ever get it. It's always on tv, it is THE body horror film in the same way Dawn Of The Dead is THE zombie film. All the contestants are 35+ years old. Most of them 40/50. 

 

I think as easy it is to overestimate others awareness i think you can underestimate. At work ages ago, working with 40/50 year olds who never talk about film I'd just ask 'have you seen Oldboy?' Everyone had, and i thought; how? How has that film broke through. Or that time my mum said 'i think Tom Hanks is a really good actor' and i thought; you think about the acting of Tom Hanks? I know not everyone finds life as intolerably dull as me and cling to art as salvation, but just because people don't openly talk about stuff doesn't mean it's not forming thoughts in their head. 

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3 minutes ago, JohnC said:

Maybe it's time to accept that not everyone has the same interests as you. And to stop making stupid, long posts about how people who don't have the same interests as you are stupid. It makes you look like a dick.

 

Am i doing that though? No. 

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30 minutes ago, Loik V credern said:

 

I'd be amazed if i came across anyone in the uk who hasn't seen a Pixar film. 

 

 

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Unless its Rocky, Heat, Ghost, Jurassic Park, Cool Runnings, Seabiscuit, Karate Kid or Forest Gump (all rubbish), then whatever charity Michael Owen is representing will be getting no money.

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1 hour ago, Loik V credern said:

My only point was that these were not hard film questions

To you. 

 

Your posts are an exercise in solipsism. Pixar doesn't feature in the lives of millions of people in the UK, despite what you might think. 

 

Let's just agree to disagree on this. 

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It is a bit of a weird hill to die on.

 

I enjoy watching Millionaire and, presumably, like most people I try to pretend to be playing the same game as the contestants go through the questions. Invariably, like with most of the contestants a lot of the questions will be straightforward and easy but then out of nowhere one will come which will just completely stump you. 

 

And unlike most Quiz shows, you're not just going to take a 60/40 educated guess and hope for the best. You make think that Dory is a blue character in Finding Nemo but it is still a bit of a step to gamble £32,000 on it just in case you've had a brain fart. And that happened to me with that question, I was like 'of course it is Dory' but then I started doubting myself, thinking was it too obvious and that's how the game gets you. 

 

The trick to Millionaire is not thinking that there has to be 15 hard questions, just 15 diverse questions which will invariably catch someone out. 

 

Loik may think that movie knowledge is just general knowledge to everyone where as a Premier League fan will think being able to name every team to have ever one the league is just general knowledge. It just depends what you're interested in. 

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52 minutes ago, SeanR said:

Apparently WWTBAM change the questions on the fly depending on the contestants apparent knowledge. Switching to pop culture if they’re “a bit academic” etc

 

Nope. Once a contestant starts, their set of 15 questions is set. That's how they are designed, in pods of 15 so there is a mix of topics. 

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