Jump to content
IGNORED

"Soul" Poll - which was your favourite?


Asura
 Share

Soul Poll  

90 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

I was thinking about this earlier, and I'm curious to see what the general consensus is - so RLLMUK, which is the definitive Soul Calibur game?

Personally I'm inclined to go with the Xbox version of Soul Calibur II. I really liked Soul Calibur I on Dreamcast; it's by far one of my favourite games ever. Soul Calibur II rarely gets as much praise because many people at the time just saw it as "more of the same"; this is certainly true but when its prequel was so good, I'm not surprised they didn't change much. What I think SCII did was really polish up the game, adding some great new characters (Yunsung ; retaining a lot of Hwang's good qualities whilst not being too similar to Xiangua - Raphael; a really fun character based upon counters and lighting-quick strikes etc). Then, whilst the Edge Master mode didn't massively improve on SC's, it was still very good.

=======================================================================

Just to give a little explanation about the list...

Soul Edge and Blade have marginal differences, but they're fundamentally very similar. One of the most interesting things to recall about it is that its Edge Master mode earned the player new weapons for their characters with different abilities, resulting in really fun casual matches with Hwang's 6" invisible sword versus Taki's poisoned knives.

Soul Calibur is certainly a contender (at least the Dreamcast version is with all of its lifespan-enhancing features). Brilliant in almost every way and probably the best all-round console fighting game released until that point (due to not only looking great and playing well, but having so many extras such as the bonus artwork, katas to watch, an intro sequence editing mode, character profiles...).

Soul Calibur II was a great game (my personal favourite as I think it was really similar to the original Calibur, but it had many elements that just perfected the formula). However, there are the three versions to consider. I personally stand by the Xbox one due to its "proper" widescreen mode, where it adjusted the FOV rather than just stretching the display, as well as having a controller similar to the Dreamcast, but Link was a fun character on the Gamecube one also.

Soul Calibur III gets an honourable mention for going mental with the single player modes, including the ability for the player to create their own characters and play through a kind of board-game mode with them, earning experience and increasing their abilities. I've separated out the Arcade and Home versions of III as they were quite different apparently, with the arcade version rebalancing all of the characters to compensate for having much fewer modes than the arcade version.

Soul Calibur IV, as an alternative, included online play and had Star Wars characters as its bonus, though it lacked the Edge Master mode.

So, my vote goes with Soul Calibur II: Xbox. I think it was pretty much perfect; the only thing that counts against it was that I often wondered if Ivy was overpowered, but I never really got to expert level with it, so it could have just been an initial impression.

=======================================================================

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's gotta be Soul Calibur on the Dreamcast. It might just be a timing thing, but I was 19/20 when that came out and four of my friends had just moved into their first house away from their parents. They had a huge TV in the living room with a 64 and a Dreamcast hooked up to it, and the sessions we had on the game were incredible. I think the wow factor has to be a huge thing too, Soul Calibur was such a leap over anything else I had played at the time that it left a lasting impression on me. It still holds up today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I have never played past Soul Calibur, really I should check the laters ones out but my fav out of the first two is the original. For me it had it all, stunning visuals, even better music, a great combat system and a lot of single player lifespan. Calibur was also outstanding with stunning looks but the music was very poor and for me it lacked the spark of the original.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had more fun with Soul Edge than any of the others, by the time Calibur came out I was more into Capcom fighters. As a technical marvel Calibur (DC) would win but like I said I had more fun with Edge.

Oddly enough I played Soul Edge with my brother this weekend. We haad it running on my CRT with SC4 running at the same time on my 360. Comparisons were made.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love SC, but SCII i couldn't get on with. Everything felt off. Characters all looked squashed and angular and many shared the same bodies, moves and controls didn't feel as perfect. There is just something that didn't feel right to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love SC, but SCII i couldn't get on with. Everything felt off. Characters all looked squashed and angular and many shared the same bodies, moves and controls didn't feel as perfect. There is just something that didn't feel right to me.

That's pretty much what I thought about SC2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I loved SC on the DC and played it a lot (moreso with a pad than an arcade stick it must be said). When SCII was released on the GC I bought it and invested in the SC Hori arcade stick and enjoyed the experience a lot more. I felt the depth of the game was more enjoyable than that of the original. Hence why I voted for the GC version. Link was okay and fun but I Seung Mina was always my character of choice.

I would have picked up SCIV for the xbox 360 but from what I saw it just didn't appeal to me at all. Also all this 'exclusive Yoda' malarky put me off. As much as I love Star Wars I just felt the series was smacking of desparation and becoming gimmicky. Convince me otherwise!

Oh and SCIII - it passed me by since it was for the Arcades.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No contest for me, Dreamcast Soul Calibur.

Just so polished, a spot-on character roster (with none of those ridiculous SC2 characters that just totally took me out of the "ancient world" feel), seriously satisfying levels of depth, an incredible single player experience that kept me playing for months, a fun, accessible multi-player mode... and a huge, huge leap in home-console graphics - which as mentioned, still holds up today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love SC, but SCII i couldn't get on with. Everything felt off. Characters all looked squashed and angular and many shared the same bodies, moves and controls didn't feel as perfect. There is just something that didn't feel right to me.

It's interesting you think that, when you consider that in the first game:

Xianghua <> Hwang

Astaroth <> Rock

Nightmare <> Siegfried

Sophitia <> Lizardman

Kilik <> Seong Mina

Edge Master/Inferno <> Everyone

Even Yoshimitsu shared some moves with Mitsurugi. In fact, I think Cervantes was the only unlockable character who didn't share his moves with someone else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's interesting you think that, when you consider that in the first game:

Xianghua <> Hwang

Astaroth <> Rock

Nightmare <> Siegfried

Sophitia <> Lizardman

Kilik <> Seong Mina

Edge Master/Inferno <> Everyone

Even Yoshimitsu shared some moves with Mitsurugi. In fact, I think Cervantes was the only unlockable character who didn't share his moves with someone else.

Most of the clone characters duplicate the originals' kata demonstrations too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, this has been quite enlightening.

Which was your favourite?

Soul Blade/Edge (PS1/Arcade) (5 votes [7.69%] - View)

Soul Calibur (Dreamcast/Arcade) (44 votes [67.69%] - View)

Soul Calibur II + Link (Gamecube) (11 votes [16.92%] - View)

Soul Calibur II + Heihachi (PS2) (1 votes [1.54%] - View)

Soul Calibur II + Spawn (Xbox) (3 votes [4.62%] - View)

Soul Calibur III (PS2) (1 votes [1.54%] - View)

Soul Calibur III Arcade ver (Arcade) (0 votes [0.00%])

Soul Calibur IV (Xbox/PS3) (0 votes [0.00%])

I suppose I shouldn't be too surprised. Certainly, in terms of the impact it had, I'm inclined to agree that Dreamcast Calibur is the best. As I said before, I went with II on the Xbox because if I was to decide to play one right now, it'd be that one, but even at the time I remember being disappointed with it due to it being a bit too similar to the first one. These days I look back on it and don't see that as a bad thing, but I digress.

What has surprised me, however, is the popularity of II for the Gamecube. As I said above, I can't imagine trying to play a fighting game with that D-pad and button arrangement. Perhaps it's that it featured Link? Personally I wasn't too fussed on any of the 3 bonus characters in II, or Necrid. Heihachi I found particularly poor as I didn't think his Tekken-style close range combat suited the game at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, this has been quite enlightening.

I suppose I shouldn't be too surprised. Certainly, in terms of the impact it had, I'm inclined to agree that Dreamcast Calibur is the best. As I said before, I went with II on the Xbox because if I was to decide to play one right now, it'd be that one, but even at the time I remember being disappointed with it due to it being a bit too similar to the first one. These days I look back on it and don't see that as a bad thing, but I digress.

What has surprised me, however, is the popularity of II for the Gamecube. As I said above, I can't imagine trying to play a fighting game with that D-pad and button arrangement. Perhaps it's that it featured Link? Personally I wasn't too fussed on any of the 3 bonus characters in II, or Necrid. Heihachi I found particularly poor as I didn't think his Tekken-style close range combat suited the game at all.

Link was easily the best of the bonus characters. As for the Cube version, wasn't it regarded as the best, technically? The GC pad actually works OK for 3d fighters unless you have a massive left thumb.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for the Cube version, wasn't it regarded as the best, technically?

I don't think so; the Xbox version had "true" widescreen support (as opposed to merely stretching the screen) and had surround sound via the Xbox's optical-out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I said above, I can't imagine trying to play a fighting game with that D-pad and button arrangement.

As soon as I had the Wavebird in hand for SC2, it felt natural. Very easy to hit the dual button presses many moves required. Had no issue with the small GC d-pad either. The Dreamcast Soul Calibur was the bestest though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What has surprised me, however, is the popularity of II for the Gamecube. As I said above, I can't imagine trying to play a fighting game with that D-pad and button arrangement. Perhaps it's that it featured Link? Personally I wasn't too fussed on any of the 3 bonus characters in II, or Necrid. Heihachi I found particularly poor as I didn't think his Tekken-style close range combat suited the game at all.

I used to play GC fighting games with a PS2 pad and converter. That took away the D-Pad issues. I was forced into it when trying to complete any of the combos in Mortal Kombat: Deadly Alliance(I think it was that one).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.