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PS3 jailbroken


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There are only a few things that would tempt me to get this.

1. Decent XMBC setup

2. Proper web browser that would allow me to view ESPN Player, so I can watch the hockey without moving my laptop to the TV

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Sorry to be a klutz here, but if the PS3 is "jailbroken" (or whatever the correct term is) what kind of fun stuff will it be able to do, apart from play pirated games, that you couldn't already do?

Also assuming there is good stuff, what would be the downsides of having a jailbroken one? Could you still go online?

I don't have a PS3 but there are a handful of games on it I would like to play and if this stuff gave the thing significant extra functionality I might be able to rationalise the purchase.

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Not really, they said last week they were planning to nerf the exploit via firmware updates. I can think of a few quick and nasty ways to cut out the exploit during a firmware update and arbitrarily block the installation of certain files, but I image they're looking for a more long-term fix than checking the PS3 filesystem for blacklisted installers.

It isn't really an 'exploit' as such though, is it? At least not like the iPhone jailbreaks are, with you waiting to find a new exploit with each new version of the firmware. And couldn't they mask the loaders to look like another piece of official software, perhaps? I don't know, I'm just wildly speculating again. They always find a way though.

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It isn't really an 'exploit' as such though, is it? At least not like the iPhone jailbreaks are, with you waiting to find a new exploit with each new version of the firmware. And couldn't they mask the loaders to look like another piece of official software, perhaps? I don't know, I'm just wildly speculating again. They always find a way though.

Well, yeah, the brute-force fix I imagined would probably get scuppered by something as trivial as changing the size of the unauthorised installer by a few KB.

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Alright guys, a simple question I am sure but what seems to be the accepted method for hacking the ps3, I know there was the USB sticks that where doing the rounds, but I am guessing these are now not needed since the signing key was released.

I have also seen the posts about geohot's custom firmware release(after updating to 3.55), but when googling there seems to be conflicting information, on the best route to take.(lots of sites still showing older information and advising getting a usb hack.)

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I'm missing something here. The master key has been found, which means that people can sign their software to say it's official, and it will then run on a standard PS3.

The bit I don't get is how do they get the signed code onto the machine? If it's just burning it onto a disc, then why can't you just burn an iso of a game onto a new disc and play it? All i can think Is the signing process is unique to the physical disc...

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I'm missing something here. The master key has been found, which means that people can sign their software to say it's official, and it will then run on a standard PS3.

The bit I don't get is how do they get the signed code onto the machine? If it's just burning it onto a disc, then why can't you just burn an iso of a game onto a new disc and play it? All i can think Is the signing process is unique to the physical disc...

PS3 can't play back burned game discs. You need to use a USB drive or something similar to get an ISO loader on there then use a USB drive to get the ISO onto the PS3 drive.

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Not really, they said last week they were planning to nerf the exploit via firmware updates. I can think of a few quick and nasty ways to cut out the exploit during a firmware update and arbitrarily block the installation of certain files, but I image they're looking for a more long-term fix than checking the PS3 filesystem for blacklisted installers.

If the bootloader fails, then there's nowt they can do.

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Alright guys, a simple question I am sure but what seems to be the accepted method for hacking the ps3, I know there was the USB sticks that where doing the rounds, but I am guessing these are now not needed since the signing key was released.

I have also seen the posts about geohot's custom firmware release(after updating to 3.55), but when googling there seems to be conflicting information, on the best route to take.(lots of sites still showing older information and advising getting a usb hack.)

Wait a month. The just started trying to do things last week, each day they seem to have something new, like I got home from work today to see the problem they had with CFW has been worked around and fixed, next they're going to try get backup loaders working properly.

This time next month I get the feeling it'll be very much sorted out and someone will have made a nice easy guide. If you do it now, you'd get so far, then have to sit and wait until the hackers figure out the next step to take.

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Alright guys, a simple question I am sure but what seems to be the accepted method for hacking the ps3, I know there was the USB sticks that where doing the rounds, but I am guessing these are now not needed since the signing key was released.

I have also seen the posts about geohot's custom firmware release(after updating to 3.55), but when googling there seems to be conflicting information, on the best route to take.(lots of sites still showing older information and advising getting a usb hack.)

Put geohots .PUP file on usb and update like an official update to 3.55-jb.

then you can just stick homebrew on your usb and install from there.

.isos can be launched from the dashboard like psn games apparently.

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On boot the system contacts the server and uploads the play list etc. this list alone is enough to get anyone that goes online banned as it shows the bootmanger etc. has been running. Here is the list and what they do, I port sniffed this a while ago before I went online with a retail unit >.> because I am not stupid hehe.

fus01.ps3.update.playstation.net > Update Server (sys updates)

mercury.dl.playstation.net > What's new ads

nsx.np.dl.playstation.net > playstation store preview

nsx-e.np.dl.playstation.net > ads

(main file exchange connections)

us.np.stun.playstation.net > on boot initiates connection

ena.net.playstation.net > SSLv3 connection after above connection

dus01.ps3.update.playstation.net > secondary update attempt (could force updates)

auth.np.ac.playstation.net > SSLv3 authentication server

(destination servers)

service.playstation.net (has multiple IPs if only the ip address is blocked)

(Error Reporting)

creepo.ww.hl.playstation.net (uploads crash reports etc.)

Almost all connections cannot just be port blocked, the port will continue to increment until it connects, you have to block the entire domains. Also a big point is that ALL computers on your network need to have these blocked not just the PS3's MAC because if you are running a proxy for example to get patches, the computer you proxy to will just allow the connections right out to the open unless all local IPs are blocked from these sites as well.

Apparently Sony can detect who has been using homebrew applications up until this point, as the PS3 reports information to Sony when it boots, meaning bans are likely. However this should be easy to get around in the future.

Common sense but, if you dont want to risk your PS3 being banned, dont use this yet.

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Apparently Sony can detect who has been using homebrew applications up until this point, as the PS3 reports information to Sony when it boots, meaning bans are likely. However this should be easy to get around in the future.

Common sense but, if you dont want to risk your PS3 being banned, dont use this yet.

Can they block the console, or just the PSN account?

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Can they block the console, or just the PSN account?

Apparently each PS3 has a unique console ID which is used to associate PSN content with a machine; each account can be tied up to 5 pieces of hardware at a time. This is an alleged screenshot from the interface through which Sony employees can reset account associations and change the standing of a console, although obviously I can't vouch for its veracity.

On top of this Sony can presumably pull any other identifiers they wish when you log in to their servers, such as your console's MAC address or motherboard ID.

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Probably just using it as a scare tactic to prevent other developers/hackers further exploiting the system.

They want Geohot out of action too, in the document Sony's lawyers have requested that Geohot ceaces all development in the circumvention of security and to hand over all computers/storage devices in the next 10 days that contain said security circumventions. :lol:

I respect Geohot, he is a great hacker but he was very naive to publicise his identity like he did, he was asking for this to happen the moment he spread his picture, name and location to the entire world. He should have taken a leaf from the notorious Dark-Alex, no legal action came his way because he kept his real identity secret.

Anyway, I hope this doesn't deter any future developments.

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