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Wee game of LotR LCG - Rescue at Dol Guldur .  We died. 

 

To be fair... we did really well considering.  Right to the very end, died only by being overcome by orcs and the Nazgul and our threat bust the 50 limit.  

 

Cracking game.

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I played Churchill at the weekend. 3 player GMT game with the players each taking on the role of one of the allies: UK, USA and USSR. It's starts around the mid point of the second world war,  and it's semi co-operative in that you are trying to defeat both Germany and Japan but there is an overall winner as you earn individual VP's for your nations actions. This can come from a number of sources such as being the nation that rolls the tanks into Berlin, developing the A-Bomb or setting up puppet governments in various countries. Although it has a war theme it's far more a euro than a wargame. Each rounds consists of a conference where the allies sit down together and choose and discuss the issues that need to be addressed. Each player gets to choose some issues that will be up for discussion. These are represented by cardboard chits which start in a central circle and there's a track leading to your nation. There's then a phase of card play with cards having values, and the value moves an issue that far towards you. At the end of the conference you get to activate all the issues that you win. The second half of the turn revolves around the military side. There's two theatres of war (Europe & Pacific) and a number of tracks lead to the centre of both (Germany and Japan). So in Europe you have USSR moving along the Eastern Front, the UK coming at Italy from the Med and a joint track for UK & USA for invading across Western Europe. Then in the Pacific the USSR comes across Asia, the UK through India and Burma and the US has two tracks through the pacific. The interesting bit is you can force your opponents to use resources to advance your own goals. So, for example, if USSR won the UK directed offensive issue you can force the UK  to use their very finite resources to aid you on the Eastern Front. Also, although you want to win you don't want to win by too big a margin because if you do then the person in second will actually win the game. So there's also an element of trying to help the nation in last place so they don't fall too far behind. Absolutely fascinating game full of really tough decisions. Just need to work out when I can play it again!

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I've not started playing it yet but I just picked up Triassic Terror from Amazon. It's got a missing token, which is annoying, but it otherwise looks like a really cool area control game where you grow a herd of dinosaurs and use raptors and t-rexes to eat up your opponents'.

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Been playing Temple of Elemental Evil with my son over the last few days... he loves it.  We've started doing 'Boardgames Before Bedtime' as a way of getting him away from screens (he's got ASD and can become obsessive with games and stuff)... he said the other day that he enjoys boardgaming as much as videogaming. :D

 

The DnD Board Game System is great for playing with kids.  It's easy, quick to get going, has a nice wee story and progression going through the campaign and being co-op means they're working as a team.  I'll be picking up the Tomb of Annihilation next.

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Bit of an odd one for me, I'm usually all about the Dungeon Crawlers and RPGs, but I decided to buy This War of Mine.  I never played the video game, typically anything war related isn't my thing, or sci fi for that matter, I just don't enjoy those themes, but something about This War of Mine had been attracting me to it.

 

It's inspired by the 1992 - 1995 Siege of Sarajevo during the Bosnian War and you play as civillians trying to survive.  During the day you take actions to explore your shelter and come up with ideas and scrounge around for parts trying to put together the basics to survive.  Fighting hunger, thirst, fatigue, misery.  The game doesn't offer an endless supply of these things either so you have to be really selective and it feels quite dark choosing who should go hungry or who should go tired to allow someone else to be more productive.   As the day goes on, you get prepared to go out and scavenge the surrounding areas hoping you don't run in to other survivors, or worse yet, soldiers, all the while trying to fulfill your objectives and resolving events as they come up.  You can play solo or co-operatively.  Solo allows you to make all the decisions yourself, co-operatively you take turns as the leading player and switch around the final decision making on who does what actions and when, the turn order is very good.  Only the leader can move things around the board.  I really like the sound of this mechanic and it kinda makes me wish I had someone to play with!

 

I've only played a few "rounds" because it was surprisingly emotional, not really something I have felt from a board game before.  The entries from the books of scripts (during certain points, you read from this book and it can be a bit choose your own adventure) are really thought provoking and the choices are quite hard to live by, you know something is going to end badly for someone and it just feels really harsh.  In saying that, I am enjoying the game.  It's a weird one to say that you're enjoying, because it all feels so bleak and desperate and you feel like you shouldn't enjoy that.

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11 hours ago, scottcr said:

Been playing Temple of Elemental Evil with my son over the last few days... he loves it.  We've started doing 'Boardgames Before Bedtime' as a way of getting him away from screens (he's got ASD and can become obsessive with games and stuff)... he said the other day that he enjoys boardgaming as much as videogaming. :D

 

The DnD Board Game System is great for playing with kids.  It's easy, quick to get going, has a nice wee story and progression going through the campaign and being co-op means they're working as a team.  I'll be picking up the Tomb of Annihilation next.

 

In case you're interested (and hadn't heard), the video game version of Tomb of Annihilation is free with Twitch Prime at the mo.

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Roll for the Galaxy

 

This was fun little beast. Felt utterly overwhelmed during the explanatory phase, but once it's up an running remarkably simple.

 

Got absolutely stomped, but really enjoyed it. The "what will other people activate" aspect was great fun. I got my money/economy entirely wrong through.


Lovely weight components and dice too

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Played so many good games over the last few weeks, couple of highlights being:

 

Terra Mystica - finally played this game and I can now see where all the praise comes from. Played it twice in as many weeks and both games were considerably different. We had the expansion races so there was always something different to look out for. The rules explanation took a while but really, the game is quite straightforward. You just don't have enough stuff to do everything you want to do. You put out the lowest level building which gives you workers, which you can upgrade to give you cash and power but since the original building goes back to your player board and covers up workers, you now get less workers to use with your cash. You're constantly juggling all the pieces together in your head. Also trying not to fall behind on the track (can't remember its name) which gives you power during the game and points at the end. I was surprised at how quick it was too with it having a set number of rounds. We're going to attempt Gaea Project in a few weeks

 

Favelas - This doesn't seem to be on many radars but i'd put it in the same group as Azul and Sagrada. You're drafting tiles to build up your player board (favela town). Its played in three rounds and when a round ends you score points if you have the most showing of each of the five colours in the game. The points can be changed through the round by placing a coloured tile onto the same colour tile. you then get to change a dice up or down one pip. its interesting because if you want to increase red to 6 from five you have to place a red tile onto an existing tile, so for this turn your affecting the score but not increasing your majority. lovely components considering its whizz kids too!

 

Formula Motor Racing - Nice small Knizia racing style game which can be pretty brutal. each player has two cars on a racing grid and you're playing cards to affect the positions. you can improve your position or screw with other players. you can be knocked out of the race too so wouldn't advise playing it with sensitive gamers. Out of three races only one of my cars finished a race :)

 

Startups - Another Oink game small box and its so fiendishly simple. You have three cards in hand of different companies. Each company has different amount of shares and you're trying to become the majority shareholder at the end of the game. You draw from the deck or a discard pile in the middle of the table and then play a card in front of you. If you then have the most of that company you take the majority shareholder token which now means you can't draw that company from the discard pile which makes it harder to increase your majority. End of game occurs and everyone then plays the last three cards in their hand which could then change majorities. If you have a company card in front of you and you are not the majority owner you then pay that player coins to the amount of cards in front of you and they get a +2 bonus effectively for each coin received this way. I totally flubbed the first game because it wasn't making sense to me, once I saw it move, it just clicked and now i'm after a copy.

 

New England Railways - Early Wallace train game with pick up and deliver, auctions and loans. Bloody love it.

 

 

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19 hours ago, LaParka said:

Played so many good games over the last few weeks, couple of highlights being:

 

Terra Mystica - finally played this game and I can now see where all the praise comes from. Played it twice in as many weeks and both games were considerably different. We had the expansion races so there was always something different to look out for. The rules explanation took a while but really, the game is quite straightforward. You just don't have enough stuff to do everything you want to do. You put out the lowest level building which gives you workers, which you can upgrade to give you cash and power but since the original building goes back to your player board and covers up workers, you now get less workers to use with your cash. You're constantly juggling all the pieces together in your head. Also trying not to fall behind on the track (can't remember its name) which gives you power during the game and points at the end. I was surprised at how quick it was too with it having a set number of rounds. We're going to attempt Gaea Project in a few weeks

 

Favelas - This doesn't seem to be on many radars but i'd put it in the same group as Azul and Sagrada. You're drafting tiles to build up your player board (favela town). Its played in three rounds and when a round ends you score points if you have the most showing of each of the five colours in the game. The points can be changed through the round by placing a coloured tile onto the same colour tile. you then get to change a dice up or down one pip. its interesting because if you want to increase red to 6 from five you have to place a red tile onto an existing tile, so for this turn your affecting the score but not increasing your majority. lovely components considering its whizz kids too!

 

Formula Motor Racing - Nice small Knizia racing style game which can be pretty brutal. each player has two cars on a racing grid and you're playing cards to affect the positions. you can improve your position or screw with other players. you can be knocked out of the race too so wouldn't advise playing it with sensitive gamers. Out of three races only one of my cars finished a race :)

 

Startups - Another Oink game small box and its so fiendishly simple. You have three cards in hand of different companies. Each company has different amount of shares and you're trying to become the majority shareholder at the end of the game. You draw from the deck or a discard pile in the middle of the table and then play a card in front of you. If you then have the most of that company you take the majority shareholder token which now means you can't draw that company from the discard pile which makes it harder to increase your majority. End of game occurs and everyone then plays the last three cards in their hand which could then change majorities. If you have a company card in front of you and you are not the majority owner you then pay that player coins to the amount of cards in front of you and they get a +2 bonus effectively for each coin received this way. I totally flubbed the first game because it wasn't making sense to me, once I saw it move, it just clicked and now i'm after a copy.

 

New England Railways - Early Wallace train game with pick up and deliver, auctions and loans. Bloody love it.

 

 

 

Have you played Clans of Caledonia... I've heard it being compared a lot to Terra Mystica, but many folks think it's more streamlined with more variation in the winning possibilities... I've only played CoC but not TM.

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Terra Mystica is sublime.  I haven't really posted about it here, but after working solo through the various factions ("diggers", "movers", "specialists" etc) and experimenting with different number of hands, I thought I would write a little about it ....and ended up with 6,000 words :coffee:.  Admittedly, some of that was restating the rules, but it really grabbed me and was #1 on my board game list for a long time before the arrival of Gloomhaven knocked it from that perch.  I know it's a giant mathematical model at heart, but it's so satisfying.

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@Cosmic_Guru I'd be interested to read that :)

 

the guy whose copy it was purposefully chose a difficult race to play (engineers) and came last. My one criticism is that the race you have can dictate how you play instead of letting you do your own thing. I had the ice Maidens and they're stronghold ability is to get 3 points per cathedral (the round ones) so I kind of focused on that and got a bit sidetracked. We drew two race tokens out of a bag and chose one of the potential four just so it didn't feel too unfair.

 

@scottcr I've not played it yet but clans is on the horizon. There's a copy in the group and we've got an all dayer planned where it's been proposed to play :)

 

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@LaParka PM me your address and I'll ping it over (do you prefer Word or Pages?).  I seem to have enjoyed the challenge of eventually getting a win with engineer and really rated chaos magician as a late developer.

 

Gaia project is basically TM in space isn't it?, Science Fiction compared to Fantasy with poorer quality plastic components (I've got it but not played as yet).

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16 hours ago, LaParka said:

And TM is on boardgamearena if anyone fancies a game online 

 

I'll give it a go, although I've never played TM before. I'll give the rules a read this weekend.

 

Edit: Just been having a look on the site: do I need a premium account for Terra Mystica? It's not a problem if I do.

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5 hours ago, Tourist said:

Gaia project seems to have a better rating on boardgame geek. What's the difference? Are there decent solo rules for either game?

 

 

It's an evolution of TM apparently with slightly more complex mechanics. Friend who has played both says it's about 60% more complex than TM 

 

4 hours ago, Cosmic_Guru said:

@LaParka PM me your address and I'll ping it over (do you prefer Word or Pages?).  I seem to have enjoyed the challenge of eventually getting a win with engineer and really rated chaos magician as a late developer.

 

Gaia project is basically TM in space isn't it?, Science Fiction compared to Fantasy with poorer quality plastic components (I've got it but not played as yet).

 

I'll pm you my address :)

 

3 hours ago, Professor Rob said:

 

I'll give it a go, although I've never played TM before. I'll give the rules a read this weekend.

 

Edit: Just been having a look on the site: do I need a premium account for Terra Mystica? It's not a problem if I do.

 

I didn't realise that you needed premium either! If you still fancy a go of it I'll get premium too :)

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My daughter and I broke out Caverna: Cave vs Cave last night after we picked it up at AireCon. Just like Agricola: All Creatures Big & Small, it is a masterpiece of small-scale Euro joy. It has a clever randomised system for actions becoming available through the game, and is quick and dirty to set up and play (by Euro standards). I doubt we'll ever encounter full-blown Agricola or Caverna, as we focus very much on 2-player games that last under an hour, but I'd be curious to know if anyone can tell me how much of the flavour of the "real" games comes across in the cut-down versions.

 

I still can't quite believe that Uwe Rosenberg managed to produce the horror that was Hengist.

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 So my big Kickstarter City of Kings arrived a few weeks ago. I went all in for this with the deluxe edition - setup trays, realistic resources and anti knock trays, so glad I did. Not since the horror of Terraforming Mars have I experienced a player mat that should have been designed like the boards for Scythe to avoid unintentional game ruining knocks. 

 This small issue aside though the game looks superb, taking obvious cues from WoW in it's early days everything is a riot of colour. Maybe not quite Dinosaur Island levels but I certainly can't think of another game in my collection that catches the eye quite so much. Heroes and certain enemies have their own standees and all the others have well designed banners to represent them. For once in a kickstarter there's no huge pile of grey plastic that requires a skilled hand to paint (or deep pockets).

.DD4CC381-0471-46F5-935C-E3FAC25083B3.jpeg.bcb970a2b9c9ed4c9fb73ca262803b75.jpeg

 I've only played the 1st Story and a couple of the scenarios so far (we're playing the 7 parts of the story as a group) but the first thing we found is that if you don't work as a team you lose very quickly to the ever increasing difficult enemies. These enemies are spawned from certain tiles or quest cards that you draw (and on certain places depending on the scenario/storyline) each one then gets a random banner drawn and the creature card goes next to the mat of the player that spawned them, you then draw a varying number of tiles from the skills bags (easy,medium and hard levels), assign the HP cubes and on the next turn around they attack. Early on it's simple to blast through them before they have a chance to do anything (and you'll have to as it's the main way to gain XP and level up) but after a while players are having to heal team mates, move out of range of attacks or even move into range to become the priority target and absorb damage. 

Heroes have a wide array of abilities to level (levelling is done via rewards from XP gained on the City so all players level up at the same time) some allow you to upgrade cubes for max HP, more damage, better luck etc or upgrade workers to move futher or generate more resources. Others give you a skill disk to place on the skill tree area - these give cube upgrades or player specific skills (extra healing, better damage, extra movement and the like).
 

Be warned though enemies are no push over - after the first few boards they can (and will) wipe an unprepared hero in a single turn with a direct targeted attack + AOE attack + random skill attack all hitting in quick succession.

 The added pressure here though is the game timers - as every round passes the time ticks by and each time midnight strikes the city loses hope, rush into a fight unprepared and your hero can be knocked out and respawned back at the city but the people lose 1 morale - either of these reach 0 it's game over. 

 It feels like the closest a board game could get to the feel of a game like Diablo, constant spawning enemies which ramp up in difficulty as your hero improves, boss battles that take your team to the very last few ticks of the clock and last few pieces of health and a big deck of new gear to buy with all the resources your workers scavenge along the way.

 My only slight concern is that once I've played the various setups a few times it could become repetitive (despite the varying tile setup and random monsters) but hopefully by then we'll have an expansion and no doubt some user generated setups on BGG to keep it interesting. 

EDIT - As if hearing my pleas Frank West the game designer has uploaded a scenario template for users to make their own. 

https://www.boardgamegeek.com/filepage/161645/scenario-template-v11-create-your-own-scenarios

 

 IMG_2905.PNG.93239da6dacf51c52d97cbfdc5df2a24.PNG

A solo story with some levelled up skills

 

 

IMG_2904.PNG.5875efd70a2c5945c8bb35c58ebc6753.PNG

 

One of the "dexterity" quests - stack with one hand then put an item on top :)

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My regular group has had real difficulties in meeting up recently. What had become a regular weekly event in my calendar suddenly fizzled out as our lives all demanded more from us. Last week was the first time I'd been to a games night since January, and even then only three of us managed to make it. But it was a great night!

 

We started with Inis, the third and most recent game in Matagot's trilogy of historical dudes-on-a-map games. This is a stunning-looking game, not just because of the incredible box and card art, with its bright and bold Celtic style, but with the wild map pieces, which tessellate despite their frayed-looking edges. The rulebook is reassuringly lightweight, promising a game that is easy to get into, like a familiar pair of shoes. While it can be difficult making those first few decisions, it all becomes clear very quickly, and trundles along at a good pace.

 

In Inis, you are the leader of a clan (actually group of clans), vying for the crown and kingship over the island you share with your fellow players. At the start of each round you'll draft four cards, and then on your turn you'll play one of these cards, and that's about half of the rules right there already. Winning the game is about manoeuvring your dudes around the map, attempting to meet one of the three victory conditions, while preventing your opponents from doing the same. This isn't necessarily accomplished through conflict, because although you can clash with each other, one of the three victories is about peaceful co-existence, and simply having a certain number of opposing pieces present in regions you are chieftain of. Clashes in this game are conducted quite amicably too, and warring players have the option to cease hostilities at almost any point in a battle.

 

The meat of the game comes from the careful drafting at the start of each round, knowing which victories your opponents are close to realising, and denying them the cards that will enable them to claim the throne whilst furthering your own efforts. As a result it's a game full of interesting decisions, played on a relatively limited board space. You can see in my picture that there were only seven distinct regions at the end of our game, and you start with only three so it feels like you've really got to make every action count because there's no room for wasted movement.

 

I really enjoyed Inis, and look forward to playing it again.

 

 

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I'm a huge fan of Inis - the fact you have to pay careful attention to each player and where they are positioned so you don't suddenly get the quiet player grabbing the pretender token right at the end of the round makes it such a battle of wits. I've had games that finished in less than 30 mins because players have got into massive scraps for territory while other players quietly pop down sanctuaries. Other games have gone on for nearly 2 hours as the game swings back and forth but every victory is well earned. 

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I've got to get Inis to the table again soon. Kemet is another Matagot area control style game I love but it can drag on for a lot longer and has so many different parts. They play very differently but I have a feeling I prefer Inis now.

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Took The Expanse to our work board game club. None of us had played it before, although I'd at least read the rules a couple of times, and it went great. It moves at a really quick pace for such a potentially dry theme, and both short and long term planning were fun.

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Map It

 

Nice little filler game. Players take turns to place locations - have have to decide their position relative to other locations

 

MapItIN.jpg

 

 

So in the above Paris was the starting location - and the rest are place by turn.

 

You can place anywhere on the table - including between others (e.g. If I picked a location I was sure was east from St Petersburg, but before Hong Kong I could place it in between)

 

You can only pick one of the 4 compass direction to use based on what's already been . e.g. If I draw something I was sure was North of The Grand Canyon, it doesn't matter - I can only put it North of Paris (or 'South of Paris but North of Cancun')

 

After you place other players can challenge. If they're right (and you're wrong) you give them one of your token, if they're wrong (and you're right) you get their tokens. Wrong answers are removed from the board, but right answers stay.


You also challenge based on one direction. e.g above I
could say "I don't think The Grand Canyon is east of Honolou" and you'd check those. It wouldn't matter if the Grand Canyon isn't west of Paris, as that's not what was challenge

 

That means things can have interesting interaction. We had 2 wrong answers on one side - but because of how they were place,d the challenger was wrong.

 

E.g. heading south someone just placed Madrid.

 

Paris

London

Madrid

 

They're challenged based. But Madrid IS South of London, even though London is not south of Paris. So the challenge fails, and both those cards stay on the table for people to have to think through.

 

Once X cards are played the round ends, and you can get bonus points by guessing how many wrong placements are on the table.

 

With a group of people of middling geographical knowledge it worked really well. If there was more disparate knowledge levels I think it would be much less fun 

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Hexx said:

Map It

 

Nice little filler game. Players take turns to place locations - have have to decide their position relative to other locations

 

MapItIN.jpg

 

 

So in the above Paris was the starting location - and the rest are place by turn.

 

You can place anywhere on the table - including between others (e.g. If I picked a location I was sure was east from St Petersburg, but before Hong Kong I could place it in between)

 

You can only pick one of the 4 compass direction to use based on what's already been . e.g. If I draw something I was sure was North of The Grand Canyon, it doesn't matter - I can only put it North of Paris (or 'South of Paris but North of Cancun')

 

After you place other players can challenge. If they're right (and you're wrong) you give them one of your token, if they're wrong (and you're right) you get their tokens. Wrong answers are removed from the board, but right answers stay.


You also challenge based on one direction. e.g above I
could say "I don't think The Grand Canyon is east of Honolou" and you'd check those. It wouldn't matter if the Grand Canyon isn't west of Paris, as that's not what was challenge

 

That means things can have interesting interaction. We had 2 wrong answers on one side - but because of how they were place,d the challenger was wrong.

 

E.g. heading south someone just placed Madrid.

 

Paris

London

Madrid

 

They're challenged based. But Madrid IS South of London, even though London is not south of Paris. So the challenge fails, and both those cards stay on the table for people to have to think through.

 

Once X cards are played the round ends, and you can get bonus points by guessing how many wrong placements are on the table.

 

With a group of people of middling geographical knowledge it worked really well. If there was more disparate knowledge levels I think it would be much less fun 

 

 

 

 

sounds like a geographical version of Timeline?

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On 01/04/2018 at 12:33, Tourist said:

Finally caved in and bought the Japanese Fury of Dracula. Not that I'll ever play it...

 

FoD is one of my favourite games... thematic as fuck.  Highly recommend playing the sound track to Bram Stoker's Dracula in the background.  Takes HOURS to play though.

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Anyone else play Sword and Sorcery, the recent Kickstarter co-op dungeon crawler?  Been playing this over the last couple of weeks and finally having some success with a good party after giving up with the evil one.  You get a 2-5 player co-op campaign over 7 scenarios with an expansion and second act planned.  Scenarios follow an adventure book format in familiar fantasy land of thieves' guilds and orcs' villages, and offer at least limited replayability.  You can also play single scenarios as stand alone experiences unconnected with the campaign but not to level up - if you fail somewhere along the way you have to give up entirely or try that scenario again.  Heroes are fairly conventional, having a combat style which limits their equipment, and also a good / evil association which limits the party composition. Turning over scenario event cards dictates the available time - run out of this and you fail.  

Some thoughts (spoilered for length):

 

Spoiler

I found the game be very hard at the outset with no healing ability or items and very basic equipment - a random number of enemies are activated after each hero's combat turn so the potential for being targeted multiple times by different enemies is high.  Furthermore, each enemy typically has multiple actions depending on context or dice rolls.  I quickly gave up with an evil party and settled with probably the easiest group - 2 H paladin, sword and board tank type and good rogue armed with a bow (4 or 5 players leads to a step up in spawns and enemy health).  It gets somewhat easier with levelling, access to supplies and getting familiar with the game dynamics - when to expect enemy spawns etc.  
Very high degree of randomness - the great thing about Gloomhaven is that it works to plan each time, once you have all the cards spread out in front of you in strict turn order.  Here you are back to viscous dice rolls and variable enemy spawns (including enemies not present in the initial scenario set up), variable enemy activation and variable enemy powers.  That's not to mention randomness in shadows (enemies or others revealed on LOS) and, occasionally, waypoints.
Illogical rules.  Things like debuffs and movement impediment being asymmetrical between heroes and enemies.  
Keeping track of each characters non-combat actions which are of various types and limited in number by level is tricky to keep in your head, particularly at the outset.
Space - it's a real sprawler for sure.  

 

 

On the plus side:
Critical hits have real force in this - often a permanent disablement, but many different types which are drawn from a bag..
Treasure cards - these are numerous and rather wonderful and worth going the extra mile to find in chests and search areas.  Much better weapons and armour than are available in the store, consumables, projectiles or items which enable instant levelling up, or very large amounts of cash.  For instance my rogue uses a bow and found a fire arrow card very early on.
Levelling up uses tokens dropped by higher level enemies - other than giving your hero a couple more health points they enable you to chose a new hero power.  Hero powers are a neat feature - typically take time to refresh dependent on their level and enable you to tailor the party somewhat.
There is reasonable re-playability in this, not only choosing the good/evil path, but also through the sheer randomness factor - for instance you can have 300 gold after the first scenario or 30.  After buying the single better quality versions of the starting gear in the store you are entirely reliant on treasure cards for improvements / alternatives.

 

I think I'll play through at least one more campaign once this one is complete (I'm assuming the real bosses are up next), in part because it has taken a while for the rhythm to bed in.

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