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Nintendo Server Hacked


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Nintendo server hacked

Company confirms attack, says no user information was obtained; LulzSec claims responsibility, posts server config file

Hacker headaches are no longer a PlayStation 3-excluisve. Nintendo today confirmed to the Associated Press that a Nintendo of America server was unlawfully accessed recently, but no user information was exposed during the attack.

Mario does not care for the lulz.

"There were no third-party victims," Nintendo spokesman Ken Toyoda told the news service. "But it is a fact there was some kind of possible hacking attack."

The hacker group LulzSec, which last week hacked into Sony Pictures' website and took personal information and passwords for roughly 1 million users. That event came just days after the group took over PBS.com and posted a story claiming that murdered rapper Tupac Shakur was alive, well, and living in New Zealand. On its Twitter account, LulzSec said the attack was "just for lulz" rather than intended to harm Nintendo.

"We're not targeting Nintendo," the group said. "We like the N64 too much; we sincerely hope Nintendo plugs the gap."

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Oof :blink:

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Except they said they didn't do anything nasty to Nintendo. Chances are, Microsoft's servers are far more secure on account of them being a professional IT company (and having been shit at security for so long that they had to hire loads of security experts to fix everything 5 years ago)

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Well, at least Nintendo never stored any credit card information. Almost makes it seem like it was worth it entering those credit card details for the times I actually wanted anything from the virtual consoles.

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Except they said they didn't do anything nasty to Nintendo. Chances are, Microsoft's servers are far more secure on account of them being a professional IT company (and having been shit at security for so long that they had to hire loads of security experts to fix everything 5 years ago)

Nothing involving user data but Microsoft have had a couple of incidents, Major Nelson had his gamertag vandalised - http://www.joystiq.com/2010/03/29/microsofts-major-nelson-gamercard-overtaken-by-hacker/

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What cracks me up, is that not so long ago, MySQL.com was compromised by an SQL Injection attack with passwords being dumped for everyone to have a go at cracking.

If the official SQL website can be hacked in such a manner, then these hacks must be more difficult to prevent than you'd maybe think.

I just hope the current wave of hacking dies down soon. They seem to be acting with impunity and can seemingly cause 100's of millions of dollars worth of damage to firms at will. It's troubling to think that all you need is a couple of proxies to hind behind and you can reek whatever havoc you like, without any serious fear of reprise. Surely something's got to give if these types of attacks become commonplace, with some type of new tech being developed which can more easily backtrace those responsible for the damage.

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What cracks me up, is that not so long ago, MySQL.com was compromised by an SQL Injection attack with passwords being dumped for everyone to have a go at cracking.

If the official SQL website can be hacked in such a manner, then these hacks must be more difficult to prevent than you'd maybe think.

I just hope the current wave of hacking dies down soon. They seem to be acting with impunity and can seemingly cause 100's of millions of dollars worth of damage to firms at will. It's troubling to think that all you need is a couple of proxies to hind behind and you can reek whatever havoc you like, without any serious fear of reprise. Surely something's got to give if these types of attacks become commonplace, with some type of new tech being developed which can more easily backtrace those responsible for the damage.

The problem with technologies like that is that they could be used by oppressive regimes against the citizens that are doing nothing worse than criticising the government.

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The problem with technologies like that is that they could be used by oppressive regimes against the citizens that are doing nothing worse than criticising the government.

Indeed, and obviously I'm not supportive of that.

Still, wouldn't an organisation like the NSA for example, need to have the ability to back trace somebody who was attempting to hack into defence related databases. Do they have special software to assist them, or do they just have a lot of very skilled people doing an arduous job?

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Indeed, and obviously I'm not supportive of that.

Still, wouldn't an organisation like the NSA for example, need to have the ability to back trace somebody whop was attempting to hack into defence related databases. Do they have special software to assist them, or do they just have a lot of very skilled people doing an arduous job?

Who knows what sort of stuff they already can and can't do. There's so much stuff that goes on that we don't know about.

I doubt the FBI are going after these people as hard as someone like the CIA would if someone was trying to access confidential files.

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Fuck, imagine how bad it would be if you couldn't play any Nintendo games online for a few weeks... Oh right, yeah.

Surprised no-one has waded in to defend the latest COD Wii game yet. Maudlin Wagglefare 2 or whatever it's called.

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