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Dishonored - Definitive Edition - now 60fps on Xbox Series


The Sarge
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I just managed my first Ghost, on the Sokolov mission. The end-mission stats showed 1 unconscious body was found, so maybe there's some leeway there. Maybe no guards were found, now that I've started stashing them on roofs when I can.

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It's still possible to be overcome by enemies even playing on normal. Using stealth, combat and supernatural powers is really the only way to play. Although you can ghost it if you prefer which is a separate challenge in itself. To that end the controls ate responsive and the systems solid. I'm on a second play through ghosting it and it's just as enjoyable as using powers or combat.

SoT wasn't just about platforming, there were puzzles and combat all wrapped up in an atmospheric and exciting tale. Judged as a platform game alone it doesn't stand up to other better examples. Just in the same way you are determined to judge Dishonored.

There is no incentive to stealth in this game, it's boring because you have no weaknesses as a character. Even if you do stealth (which I do) there is no sense of achievement that you did something special or you got yourself out of a bad situation. In SoT, platformig, was an essential part of gameplay. You can't compare these two things like you did. The stealth mechanic in this doesn't offer anything to the genre, like SoT's simplest platforming allowed a grander puzzle design.

But since you disagree I think we've reached a stalemate.

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There is no incentive to stealth in this game, it's boring because you have no weaknesses as a character. Even if you do stealth (which I do) there is no sense of achievement that you did something special or you got yourself out of a bad situation.

What do you want as an incentive? A round of applause?

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That's the trouble with gaming these days! Surely the incentive is having fun? People would rather play a boring game that gave out easy Trophies/Achievements I bet! If you get no fun out of stealthing around then you might as well just stop playing it.

It's like the moaning about peeking not being realistic. It's not an issue at all - It's a gameplay mechanic, it's essentially a puzzle game and that's one of the rules. At least you know what's what. Better that than some frustrating "is he, isn't he?" thinking every time you're in cover.

Yes in short I'm enjoying it! Really bad at it though.

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Bit why do you insist on focussing on the stealth only when in your words "it's not a stealth game" ?

Am I not allowed to say the stealth portion sucks but you are allowed to say that it's good?

What do you want as an incentive? A round of applause?

Ι can't have fun when there is virtually no challenge, it gets boring. Maybe you like that but I don't.

I hope that's ok.

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Tbh ive yet to play a 100% stealth game that was actually fun. Most stealth games ive played just annoy me because if you get rumbled chances are youre fucked. I like the stealth in this because it just compliments the other styles of play. If you get caught you can still have fun fighting your way out or just trying to blink your way out of it.

Im up as far as the flooded district now and still really enjoying it. The art style, setting and gameplay are all immensely fun. Its not often you get a game where everything is put together so well. I also cant help but think of Dunwall as a virtual version of Oran from Camus' book The Plague :wub:

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Tbh ive yet to play a 100% stealth game that was actually fun.

Let guess: you haven't played Mark of the Ninja yet. Shame on you, Brer, shame on you! Such a quality game, one of the best of the entire year regardless of personal genre preferences and here you are saying things like that :(

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Am I not allowed to say the stealth portion sucks but you are allowed to say that it's good?

I'm just attempting to coax some genuine criticism about the game from you. I never said the stealth was good - I've barely commented on that aspect alone.

Ι can't have fun when there is virtually no challenge, it gets boring. Maybe you like that but I don't.

I hope that's ok.

So what aspect of it are you enjoying then?
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I'm just attempting to coax some genuine criticism about the game from you.

I've presented plenty of genuine criticism on the stealth aspect. Maybe you don't agree with it but it's there.

So what aspect of it are you enjoying then?

I like the art direction and the controls, mostly. Everything feels finely tuned and melee combat, though simple, is really well done. Powers are also fun and make you feel a real badass (until you realize that they break the game and make everything so easy). Story is nothing special but the characters act their roles properly, which is also a plus for me, even if they are generic.

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I finished this earlier. I played it stealth-style. Ghosted the majority of the levels. Took 20 hours or so.

I thought it was great. My favourite of the year so far. Never had any problems with how the stealth worked, seemed pretty fair to me. I agree about the lack of non-lethal takedown options (an aerial equivalent would be nice). Story, graphics and everything were good as well. I'd say the highlight of the game for me was the mission on the bridge, loved the scale of the setting.

I'm gonna do a lethal play through now.

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Let guess: you haven't played Mark of the Ninja yet. Shame on you, Brer, shame on you! Such a quality game, one of the best of the entire year regardless of personal genre preferences and here you are saying things like that :(

Tbh im terrible, terrible at stealth games. Im the kind of player who HAS to do everything perfectly in them and it means i end up just quicksaving/loading every 2 seconds, and i cant get out of that mindset :(

Dishonored is a game where i can fuck up the stealth and not have it bother me too much as everythign else is fun too

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this bug i'm suffering still hasn't been fixed yet - getting really hacked off with bethesda's attitude to quality control.

I encountered a bug right at the very end,

when you confront Havelock. He was struggling with Emily and they suddenly stopped and just stood looking at each other. I headshotted him from the stair case where the 'cutscene' initially starts and i run up through the crane house to Emily who's meant to have have been hung on the rope(?) except she's stood on the floor and nothing happens. Luckily i'd not long saved so i reload and the same things happens but instead of killing him straight away i run up to him and knife him, the end cutscene kicks in and jobs a goodun'.

Overall i liked the game and loved the art style.

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Tbh im terrible, terrible at stealth games. Im the kind of player who HAS to do everything perfectly in them and it means i end up just quicksaving/loading every 2 seconds, and i cant get out of that mindset :(

Dishonored is a game where i can fuck up the stealth and not have it bother me too much as everythign else is fun too

Man, haven't you been reading the Mark of the Ninja thread? The way you describe it proves that Mark of the NInja would be PERFECT for you! Seriously! It takes away all the frustration associated with either being terrible at stealth games or by being OCD about a perfect playthrough, or both. It does this by the brilliantly implemented feedback, at any moment the players knows exactly how visible and audible each and every element on-screen is and what the effect of any given action will be. It does this without feeling dumbed down at all, don't ask me how they accomplished that - just trust me on this. And not only does it take away any frustration people have who usually don't like stealth games, it also makes it that much more tactical for those of us who do. In combination with the pitch-perfect controls, you never ever feel like game is fucking you over, it's always your own fault and you know exactly what you did wrong. And the quick-saving/quick-loading every two seconds problem? Not a problem in Mark of the Ninja! It uses a checkpoint system instead, but before you stop reading: it might be the best damn checkpointing in any game ever made. They're always intelligently placed all throughout the level, before any bit of sneaky stealth set-up, and restarting a checkpoint is instantaneous - no waiting for the game to load again! And, and (yes there's more!) despite being a score-based game, it doesn't penalize you for restarting a checkpoint or for taking your sweet time to clear a level. You can take as long as you want and retry as often as you want and it won't impact your score or the points you get for upgrading your ninja and his items! And this is also accomplished somehow without dumbing the game down or making it feel easy. Give it a go, you'll thank me for it! :)

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36 hours on the clock and done.

Bar the odd repeating conversation from the guards, dug pretty much every minute of that.

Executed Havelock after a brutal brawl. The look on his face as I turned his pistol on him and pulled the trigger. JUSTICE.

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http://www.dailyreco...honored-1389938

EDINBURGH has inspired the fantasy setting of one of this year’s biggest video games, Dishonored – and it’s all thanks to stunt cyclist Danny MacAskill.

Game developer Sebastien Mitton had planned to base his stunning ­fictional city, Dunwall, on London.

But he was unable to find enough historical areas left untouched by World War II bombings.

Back home in France, he saw a film of MacAskill pulling stunts on the streets of Edinburgh and immediately realised Scotland’s capital had exactly the look he wanted.

So Sebastien went to a Burns supper in his home town of Lyon before travelling to Edinburgh to see it for ­himself – and going on to recreate what he saw in the stunning game.

Sebastien told the Sunday Mail: ­“Dishonored is an urban game set in a fictional era somewhere between our 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century.

“London suffered from heavy bombing during the Second World War, so it is difficult to find pieces of Jacobean or Elizabethan architecture downtown.

“During our trip to London, we saw old colleges but not entire streets.

“Back home, I found a video of a Danny Macaskill doing incredible tricks in Scotland, and especially in ­Edinburgh.

“The video is named Way Back Home and I instantly felt that I’d spotted the place we had to visit.

“Old downtown Edinburgh represents what I love about some European cities – a perfect mix of past and present.

“It was exactly what I was looking for in order to develop a believable universe with fictional elements, something where we can blend technology and history.

“Marc, a friend from home, organises the Burns day every year in Lyon.

“During this event, I met with a lot of friends who worked and studied in Edinburgh.

“They shared their personal ­experiences of our city, and this created a lot of excitement about Edinburgh.

“So plane tickets were bought a couple of days after that and I started visiting the city on Google Street View.

“This is how Edinburgh took over from London in our mind, and it gave us even more than we were hoping.” ­Dishonored is a first-person stealth-based game in which you play an ­assassin, framed for a killing and on the run.

The game gurus flew in for a packed four-day visit, armed with cameras and a hunger to soak up as much of the city’s look and feel as possible.

Sebastien was joined on the trip by long-time colleagues Viktor Antonov, visual design ­director at Zenimax, and Jean-Luc ­Monnet, assistant art director.

He said: “We stayed for four days in the city, but those four intense days and nights were short.

“We brought back around 3000 pictures from that trip.

“The very first thing we did was to get a look from a high position in order to see the town from a bird’s eye view.

“We went to Regent Road and then climbed up the city observatory in Regent Gardens.

“From there we started our analysis, and the parallel with ­Dunwall was ­amazing. At that time, we were working on a version of the White Tower in London, next to the Thames, in order to make it more massive, more aggressive.

“In Edinburgh, there is the ­beautiful fortified castle overlooking the city, and close to it is the train station. We just exchanged the railroad for a river and we were in Dunwall.

“It was time for us to dive into the urban atmosphere – its verticality, its Scottish renaissance, its smells, the ­Scottish faces.

“Edinburgh is the perfect match with the game in terms of street networks – it alternates with large streets and closes in a way that you get lost in easily, and that was the best opportunity to find visual ­treasures. Some streets are so narrow that even a midday sun brings little light.”

And Sebastien admits Scots will ­recognise not only the feel of ­Dunwall, but even specific ­buildings.

He said: “Some may think they ­recognise some places, others will feel the inspiration.

“Sometimes you will ­recognise a house, a bridge, a chimney, a mystical light in a street, a turned-on light during the day.

“I think somebody will ­recognise the Scottish Government’s building as an inspiration for our Overseer’s headquarters inside the game.

“The goal was not to copy a city but to be inspired by it while ­avoiding clichés.

“For the last few years, I’ve worked on visual storytelling, and it is very ­important for me to create a city with a strong back story, a huge history, a soul. It was the first time I found a city with all those elements.

“We did not only bring back ­architecture and ­volumes to Dunwall, we also brought back our experience, our notes, smells and the people we met, and you can feel that everywhere in the game.

“Edinburgh and Dunwall are contrasted cities, a mix between beauty and ­violence, wealthiness and poverty, the cold rough touch of a stone and the warmth of whisky.”

Even when it came to the technical process of ­creating Dunwall, the team’s stories and ­memories from the ­Edinburgh trip played a huge part. Sebastien said: “I composed a ­selection of visual references and shared the trip with the art team. I didn’t want to leave any room for approximation.

“Then came the huge work of briefing the team of architects and ­amazing ­texture ­artists.

“As our game creation process is ­organised with the gameplay team, this gave us the opportunity to tell stories about our experience in Edinburgh ­during meetings and casual talks.

“The goal was to inspire the game with our own personal feelings about that trip.”

With the game now in shops – and flying off the shelves thanks to rave reviews – Sebastien admits he is keen to return to Scotland, but this time to explore the countryside on holiday.

He said: “If we have the opportunity, you bet we’ll come back. There are so many places I still don’t know.

“It would appeal as a holiday ­destination, but not in an urban area. I would think I was there for work.

“My brother, who produced the sound on Dishonored, took a trip on his bicycle in Scotland a couple of years ago and I would love to take the same trip in the Highlands.”

From the centre pages of today's Sunday Mail.

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Man, haven't you been reading the Mark of the Ninja thread? :)

I might give it a bash when it a bit cheaper so. Spent enough on games this month as it is :(

Just finished this now. Definitely one of the games of the year for me. Everything about it was brilliant, from the setting, to the art style, to the characters. I know some people complain about the stealth here, but i saw it not really as a stealth game, in fact the game it reminds me most of is Crysis. Youve got a load of cool powers at your disposal and you can play out a level as you see fit. And if you get busted you can fight you way out as enjoyably as you could sneak in.

The last few levels in particular were stunning i thought.

Flooded district was creepy as hell, and the Lighthouse was jsut an amazingly designed steampunk military base.

Every level was so visually distinct from the preceding level it just made it an absolute joy to play. The graphics on PC were fucking gorgeous at times too. Immediately went in for a 2nd play on hard. Only ghosted 1 level, dunwall tower, and that was an accident.

As for the final baddie

I devoured Havelock with rats. Thought it seemed fitting

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Halfway through my second (very hard) playthrough where I do not kill a soul. I love how some missions can offer you entirely different experiences. For example, on my first playthrough I must've spent at least an hour sneaking my way through the Boyle Mansion mission, now I simply took a different, far more direct, path and finished the mission in like 15 minutes or less. Madness! I also liked how the target changed for me the second time around. On my first playthrough I had to neutralize the Boyle in red. This time however it turned out to be the one in black and this wasn't simply a mere colour change. She had her own dialogue options and responses. A small but neat little touch.

Absolutely loving this.

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Anyone else managed to find the

safe with the Imperial Whale model in it,

on the Flooded District level?

And I abandoned my no kills rule after the way this level started. I played Corvo as an honorable man who tries not to slaughter his way through the missions he takes, but any of those dudes in whaler masks I now see gets a crossbow bolt through the brain-pan.

Seems much more satisfying this way. Especially as I had to go to so much trouble

to get my gear back. Bastards.

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