Jump to content

TOP 10 rare/most valuable 32bit games in existence


Old Dear's Menu
 Share

Recommended Posts

Yeah it's pretty rare and bloody good.

Hoo, shit. There are two or three brand new copies of PM for sale at a local indie. They've been there for what seems like decades, and I've come pretty close to picking one up on several occassions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hoo, shit. There are two or three brand new copies of PM for sale at a local indie. They've been there for what seems like decades, and I've come pretty close to picking one up on several occassions.

How much?

It does seem to vary a little on ebay...sometimes £45-50 sometimes around £35.

I lost my copy when me and my girlfriend split and she took it. Bitch. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buy them and then sell one to me :lol:

Yours for £60. :)

Seriously, I'll pop round when I finish work and see how much they are. If they're around £20-25 I'll pick one up for you and we'll arrange some way to pay me back. Paypal or whatever. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yours for £60. :)

Seriously, I'll pop round when I finish work and see how much they are. If they're around £20-25 I'll pick one up for you and we'll arrange some way to pay me back. Paypal or whatever. :D

Sweet. That'd be cool. B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why do you "need" them? Oh, to sell at an extortianate price and keep the vicious circle running, right.

I buy from boot sales to finance my other games purchases - as I'm going round to buy stuff cheaply for my collection then why not buy stuff and sell it on and finance the bigger priced items I want?

Or why not buy games to swap with mates in Japan or the US?

Listen matey, if I or DCM pick up a title then you've got a chance of trading for it or coming to an arrangement, if the guys that own record shops pick it up (as I see them do) then forget it, they'll just flog it for profit and not give a toss so have a pop at them but whilst your at it slag anyone that purchases anything of any value and selling it on for a profit. These titles because they can be sold on for a profit will be picked up by SOMEONE. Also if the owner of these gfames is aware fo their cost then why shouldn't they be allowed to sell on ebay and get top price for their games - why should they have to sell at a boot sale cheaply?

Tell me, who's forcing anyone to buy a game at an inflated price on ebay? Who's forcing people to bid the amount they are prepared to pay for a game? If it's not worth it to you fine, don't buy it, play a pirate or whatever or maybe try to do something useful and encourage budget rereleases of games so they can be bought cheaply.

Why not slag off the game publishers they are as complicit in this as anyone if games are rereleased then generally they don't end up as hard to buy..

I know for a fact that DCM (and myself) have done a lot for games collectors in the way of getting games released and writing FAQS and running events, how do you think these (The Britmeet events) things get funded? From our pocket because by and large lamers sit on the side and don't put their hand in their pocket, they just snipe from the sides and slag things off. We've put as much into this as we've ever taken out if you disagree TS.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

E-Z have you ever been ripped off on ebay before? You seem pretty bitter. I have over 200 positive feedback that means 200 happy customers who paid their money and got what they wanted. If you see a copy of Kizuna encounter at a car boot sale for £5 and you don't buy it you'd be right idiot. Ask yourself would you buy it? You wouldn't as you don't even know what kizuna encounter looks like or is, I do, that's not a failing of mine but a skill that I have.

Okay, that's a stark accusation. You don't need to know much about games to know what to buy to eBay - you need a list in your head of what games are worth what. Indeed, because I know what games are worth it doesn't mean I buy them to resell on eBay. I don't agree with buying for eBay, but I tolerate it. And no, I haven't been ripped off on eBay - I buy what I think something is worth preventing me from being ripped off.

And yes, I know what Kizuna Encouter is. I also know if I saw a copy of Kizuna Encouter at a carboot for £100 I wouldn't automatically buy it (nothing to do with morals either). You can tell me with your l33t games knowledge why that is, I'm sure. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No... I'm... shock horror... Halo. I've got 250 posts and I frequent #edge as Halo-. I'm on TheDVDForums as HaloMan and NTSC-UK as Halo.

I just replied because I thought some of the replies to E-X's admittedly over-the-top anti-reselling-on-eBay posts were taking the piss. They were implying that they were somehow better than people who don't eBay, that buying stuff to resell on eBay requires any form of intelligence and that someone eBaying something should be considered to be a positive thing. Neither of which are true, IMO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

**Excuse the overly long and boring post**

>Lesson 1 : Supply and Demand - The first piece of false logic any Ebay profiteer >uses, be they ticket touts or game sellers or whatever, is that people pay what >they want to pay for the item they are selling.

>- a game is hyped by a magazine, or in the case of several 'rare' PlayStation >games appears on a pack in demo that many people will have played - this >creates a demand for said game.

See, you've cocked up already - how can a game be hyped by a demo disc that came out several years ago? - are you saying that as a game still has strong "residual" demand (look it up in relation to cars, it's a concept that'll come in useful when purchasing one so you don't end up writing off the entire cost after a year) that people should be forced to sell it off cheap? Nintendo games keep their value, as do a lot of rpgs - thats why they are rare because people keep them therefore the 2nd hand markets smaller for more than one reason.

You can't really hype a game up at the magazine or ebay level, now people can believe they should be buying it for credibility (see RSG) or it becomes a talisman for the collectors on the system but most games are there as a collectable because ordinary people desire to own the original as they enjoy owning that original..

>a finite number of copies are in circulation so acquisition of said game is more >difficult than those with a higher print run

Then rerelease it - As I've said games companies are as much to "blame" on this front as anyone else for piss poor management of their IP.

>- this means that when copies are made available in a nation-wide market place, >like Ebay, prices reach their peak because the title will sell for the highest price >anyone in the country (who is looking at Ebay) is willing to pay

So, tell me - as someone who clearly has no idea about how ebay works do you know where most of the buyers are? Well I'll tell you, up north, Scotland, remote places like this, places where these games are simply not available point blank.

I've had letter from people, that have been looking years, even when the game was fairly new that couldn't get it locally - they go on ebay and BANG, its there, 5 copies. Now they can either spend hours looking for it and they may not find it or they buy it, play it and enjoy it. Now if they sell that game on then there's another copy out there - but if they love it and keep it then there's less copies. So afformentioned buyers of the game are patially to blame in this. You know what - a lot of people that buy psone games are women, they don't have time to shop for rare games, they want to just buy them and play them. They aren't the victims of hype, they just want to own these titles for may I say the purest of reasons.

>what should happen next is that those who really want the game should be able >to put some effort in and find the title for substantially less through the usual >second hand channels,

But they can - how the fuck does anyone else find anything? And what is "substancially less than" applying to? The market value? Yes The market value. Ie, what someone who just wants to buy the game off ebay will pay for something.

>what actually happens is that a bunch of greedy assholes see a profit in finding >said title, and therefore come into direct competition with those who are after a >cheaper copy to actually play

Yep, they buy games and sell them on making a profit - how dare people expect to be paid for work!

>- from this system the only people who benefit are the greedy assholes, gamers >and those with a conscious lose out

So lets get this straight, those who want this game and are prepared to pay for it (people like me) are in no way responsible for the price going up?

Are you giving this the old holier than though gamer vs collector arguament?

So, what if you already own this game? Shouldn't you get top price for it? Should you HAVE to sell it at a boot sale for a fiver?

Hey I don't ENJOY paying expensive prices for games but I have come to DEAL with it.

Unlike many here I can remember games collecting pre ebay, newsgroup auctions, a true community, game trades - all gone thanks to ebay.

But hey, one door shuts another opens - now, because I am prepared to pay for the items I have a completer set of PCGs - something I barely saw in the shops when it was new let alone at a boot sale! I went booting for 10 years, didn't find one copy but ebay had them at a price. Now I paid that price but I didn't have to... and as others have completed their collections the price has collapsed.

Tell me, Am I a greedy arsehole because I'm not some otaku wannabie comelately and I owned most of my Japanese Saturn collection before the machine suddenly became trendy again? I'll tell you people that get into a console late are as to blame as anyone, it's them who pushed up the Saturn prices but it's a free country and market so they are as entitled and as welcome to buy these games as anyone - deal with it!

>Lesson 2 : Economics and Morality - I am willing to bet that the majority of Ebay >profiteers are Thatcher's children (not literally, that would be ridiculous), and >were thus raised with a totally immoral (or should that be amoral) attitude to >business - ie don't consider anything but yourself and the profit you will make, >fuck everyone else, they are weak.

Grow up mate, like the 80's are well over, put the red wedge album back in the bag and walk away from the record player. I would hardly equate walking around 3 car boot sales buying cheap games then ebaying them to be on a par with the fucking westland affair.

>Based on similar lines, it would be easy to justify becoming a crack dealer - you >wouldn't be forcing people to take these drugs, its the inequalities and problems >in society that have led them to it.

Grow up child. Any kind of trading is the same as drug dealing basically then yes?

>Oh and the last excuse is the most commonly given for any immoral behaviour in >our society, 'if I don't do it someone else will'

Frankly they will - the weeks, days, hours I don't go our someone out there is buying items - anything and selling them on at a profit.

>Lesson 3 : How to make real easy money - as that is after all what all these >profiteers are after, money without (hardly) any effort.

I assume you'll not want them to invest in ebay?

You think aquiring a good knowlegde of games is easy? I mean if you don't have one you end up buying rubbish or hopeing to get lucky.

Let me tell you something, if a shop sells a game for a fiver and I buy it thats between me and the shop, if I go to a boot sale and someone is selling games for a certain price then thats their business, I can buy them, leave them or make an offer - again it's a transaction with 2 people involved. If your good you can turn 10-20 quid into 120 if your good and can be arsed to know your subject. Shares? No thanks, my father has far more accumin with those than myself and after seeing the ride He's had, coupled with the fact my personal work options have been worthless for 39 months out of 44 I'll give it a miss thanks.

>Now all you have to do is sit back, no trawling through all those gaming shit->holes any more, occasionally consult teletext or the financial sections of >the .newspapers, and wait until the right time, then sell, sell, sell!

But I want to work my cash harder than that - stocks right now are trading at between 15 to 28 times profits, that means the whole market is again overvalued, so no thanks, I think I'll go for something where I'm in control of my own destiny pretty much and has a much bigger rate of return....

Look seriously.

It's the people choice, if they wanna go out there and trade, buy, sell it's their choice, I'd love them to not be there as competition but it's a free country so good luck to them, I hope that they say hello and we can have a chat, it's their choice on ebay to buy anything I sell, if they don't then fair enough just stop accusing people who buy and sell of being the entire "problem" of rising game "prices" because frankly they aren't.

chill out mate, it's just a bunch of games, not worth getting upset or falling out with people over...

Cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*applauds 213*

On a separate note I'd say that Paper Mario is uncommon and definitely worth a fair amount due to being a late game, an RPG, a pseudo follow-up to the much moved Mario RPG on SNES, and featuring Nintendo's flagship character.

However - I'd suggest that PAL copies of Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine on N64 are rarer (although less desireable).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't fault 213's logic. Excellent post.

EDIT- come to think of it, E-X's entire argument [whatever that may be, I'm not entirely sure] swings around the idea that the high auction prices for collectable games are anomalous, not the car boot prices. Which is backwards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Games are expensive on Ebay.

Games are cheap at car boot sales.

Games are easy to find on Ebay.

Games are hard to find at car boot sales.

Resellers buy cheap games from car boot sales, and sell them for more money on Ebay.

Non-reseller gamers want to buy old games, but can't find them, and have to buy the games from Ebay at the higher prices.

Ticket touting was mentioned earlier in the thread. Do posters here consider ticket touting to be a good thing or a bad thing?

As with games, there is a finite supply of tickets for any given gig. Touts can buy up tickets, and sell them on Ebay for a higher price. Buyers can either go through the official channels (where tickets are hard to get), or they can use Ebay.

Yet touts are almost universally condemned, and touting itself is borderline illegal. What exactly is the difference? And why specifically is touting considered wrong in the first place?

Addressing the second question first, it boils down to the difference between entrepreneurship and negative aspects of unregulated capitalism: monopolies, price-fixing and general contempt for the consumer.

Entrepreneurship is a good thing - providing a service to others, and making money in return, without harming anyone, and allowing competition.

Monopolies and price-fixing are bad - taking advantage of a situation in order to establish total control over supply in order to dictate a price for the consumer to pay. That is not good capitalism in part because it prevents the key mechanisms of supply-demand and competition from working.

Touts buying up tickets may in part be responsible for the scarcity of tickets in the first place. They are effectively and deliberately engineering a supply problem in order to cause buyers to seek their services, and be forced to pay a higher price as a result. This is widely considered to be an unethical way to run an enterprise.

Buyer: "Why are your prices so high"

Seller: "I am providing a service to people who can't find games"

Buyer: "Why can't they find games?"

Seller: "Because I bought them all..."

So the issue is this: do 'collectors' cause a supply problem by buying multiple copies of games? In a number of ways, yes:

1) The total number of bargain-priced games is reduced, as games are taken from the car-boot arena and transferred to Ebay.

2) Ebay-sold items with inflated prices may not re-enter the car-boot market, as people who have paid a high price won't risk selling a game on the cheap.

3) Ebay sellers often hang on to games in anticipation of a price hike in future, rather than risking a low-price sale.

3) As the trend continues over time, eventually we will see the car-boot market drying up, and historical games will become Ebay-only l33t purchases.

And no, 'piracy' is most certainly *not* an answer. And if you need to mark-up games to pay for things, get a better job for christ's sake.

Poverty is no justification for anything.

Something to think about amidst all the name-calling and emotive guff on this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't get cheap tickets by spending months searching car boot sales, though, so I don't think the analogy with touts quite holds...

Aaaaanyway, it's a given that there are a certain number of collectors out there and only a limited number of games. It's inevitable that eventually every rare game will wind up in the hands of a collector who is unwilling to sell it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't get cheap tickets by spending months searching car boot sales, though, so I don't think the analogy with touts quite holds...

No, but ticket touts do spend hours phoning up to buy the tickets, queue up for hours to be front in line, spend time outside of the venue selling the tickets etc. As far as analogies go, it's not a bad one really.

Good post epsilon :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can see both sides of the story, although it's very odd that some low print games seem to completely bypass the shops. (I have never seen a single copy of Skies of Arcadia in Australia at retail. At all.)

It can hurt when as a gamer you just want ot play a game for the hell of it but all your local spots are haunted by speculators. (The mythical 'sumguy' as my wife calls them. As in "Oh, we had a stack of secondhand Paper Mario's but SumGuy just bought the lot.")

I've seen a few rarities at the local indie down here and decided to leave them as I already owned a copy and I knew how thrilled I was at finding a copy. It's good karma. And probably a bit stupid. But I'm a bit eccentric.

Besides, the karma gods must have been smiling on me last week. I found Suikoden 2. In mint condition. For $35AU. At last I'm able to play it. (The price down under for it is about $150-$200AU.)

Game companies have a lot to learn though. If demand is so high why not rerelease the title? That way the money is flowing into your pocket.

Square did this in Australia two years ago. Released Final Fantasy 6 (which was being sold for silly money) for $25AU on the PSOne. (With a free demo of FF10. Great promotional idea.)

It remained in the sales charts for months.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If there is a game I really want then I will happily go onto ebay and pay the money to get it. An example of this is Tombi, which I couldn't find anywhere except ebay. Where it not for ebay I doubt I would be playing the game at all now. It's a great service. Did he buy the game froma boot sale for £1? Who cares. Not me.

The gug that sold it for £1 got his money.

The chap selling it on ebay got what he wanted.

I got the game I wanted.

We are all happy. The only problem I see is if people get bogged down/obsessed with the money aspect. Now sure I would have liked to get the game for £1 from a boot sale but not if, for example, that meant getting up at 5am and driving 300 miles to Newcastle or something.

I was willing to pay the money I paid and no-one forced me to do it.

As I see it ebay and boot sales are a great way for retro gaming love to be spread around, albeit sometimes at a price. :)

The chap I mentioned earlier, who bought my boot sale copy of Super Puzzle Fighter was delighted with it. I doubt he even cares how much I paid for it as he has the game he wants that he is enjoying.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

come to think of it, E-X's entire argument [whatever that may be, I'm not entirely sure] swings around the idea that the high auction prices for collectable games are anomalous, not the car boot prices. Which is backwards.

Exactly, The only things that are arguably unethical is paying some granny 25p for her mint copy of Radiant Silvergun or an attempt to corner the amrket in a particular game and manipulate prices. I doubt that in anything other than for the very rare and expensive item prices can be manipulated that much. Having a liquid (ish) market for second hand videogames which you can access from anywhere in the country is fantastic for the fan of videogames. People are just sore that their precious information about what is rare and valuable is leaking out into the wider world, meaning its less likely you can take of advantage of someone's ignorance. The arbitrageurs provide a valauble service.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Square did this in Australia two years ago. Released Final Fantasy 6 (which was being sold for silly money) for $25AU on the PSOne. (With a free demo of FF10. Great promotional idea.)

It remained in the sales charts for months.

This is an excellent example of how the collector's market influenced a multinational. Due to the very high prices being demanded for Chrono Trigger, FF4/ 5 and 6 (and the fact a superior fan translation of FF5 was drifitng around) resulted in all these gems getting released in the US (lets not get sentimental here- they did it so that they could see a slice of the $80 ebay cart sale price).

The upshot was that gamers who wanted to play the game but had no interest in owning an original SNES cartridge could do so at a bargain price. However, its interesting to note that there was only a very small effect in the price of a Chrono Trigger SNES cartridge: proving that the reason the prices for the originals were so high was because collectors wanted to own the original cart- not simply play the game.

Just ti reiterate this point which negates the touting idea:

Games, just like cars, records, books, comics ir any other mass-marketed collectable become valuable for three reasons:

1. The print run must be low

2. There must be high buyer demand

3. The game must be of a high and wide-appealing quality

A game will be more valuable the higher it scores on each of these variables. Only one of these variables can be (possibly) mainpulated by resellers (demand- and only up to a very very limited point) so you are vastly overstating the power of the resller to manipulate prices in the market.

The high prices on ebay reflect this system of value rather than the artificial inflation you are proposing.

e.g. Case study of this would be the original Dreamcast only release of Ikaruga. Market watchers, imagining the game's collectability to replicate that of its older brother, Radiant Silvergun, bought up large quanitites of the title (perhaps this action you could justifiably take issue with). Of course, this was an obvious potential money spinner so many many people had the same idea. Looking at ebay over the few weeks after Ikaruga's launch it was clear that all of these seller's were going to lose money on the title as the market was flooded and far outstripped demand. This is a prime example of how the artifical price jacking of which you're talking simply doesn't work. The game has to be rare, in demand and high quality on its own merits before ebay rersllers can contribute (even a little) to its maintained market value.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ticket tout analagy is flawed, as touts by the tickets when they go on sale to the public from a number of sources. Concerts and football matches have a finite number of availible seats. Now if you tried to do this for games you would for example, buy all the copies of PSO 3 from every Game store in the UK (Its a Game exclusive) and hold on to them. Now if you did this the game would sit near the top of the charts and Sega would just print some more as they can make as many as are needed, finite only to the number of Gamecubes in circulation and projected hardware sales.

Now almost every rare PAL game you have has the opportunity to buy at retail. Now one thing I see is that there are a set of gamers that wait until they can get a cheap copy, take for example the Neo Geo Pocket. It was widely ignored and few people brought one. I was an avid fan of the machine and broght the games at £25 retail usually the day they went on sale. I only ever brought two games used for £10, Tennis and Soccer. So as I buy games when they are new I paid £25 for Fasellei not £50, I paid £26 for Panzer Dragoon Saga not £100, I paid £40 for Radient Silvergun not £130.

Now what happens, and I see this time and time again is that when a machine has support pulled lots of people become intrested in the machine as its cheap and the games are cheap, the same people that would not pay for it when it was new. Dreamcast anyone?

Its these people that are bitching and winging as they can't find a game that had a low print run during the machines life that they expect to be paying the sub five pounds they paid for most of thier games.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ticket tout analagy is flawed, as touts by the tickets when they go on sale to the public from a number of sources. Concerts and football matches have a finite number of availible seats. Now if you tried to do this for games you would for example, buy all the copies of PSO 3 from every Game store in the UK (Its a Game exclusive) and hold on to them. Now if you did this the game would sit near the top of the charts and Sega would just print some more as they can make as many as are needed, finite only to the number of Gamecubes in circulation and projected hardware sales.

Now almost every rare PAL game you have has the opportunity to buy at retail. Now one thing I see is that there are a set of gamers that wait until they can get a cheap copy, take for example the Neo Geo Pocket. It was widely ignored and few people brought one. I was an avid fan of the machine and broght the games at £25 retail usually the day they went on sale. I only ever brought two games used for £10, Tennis and Soccer. So as I buy games when they are new I paid £25 for Fasellei not £50, I paid £26 for Panzer Dragoon Saga not £100, I paid £40 for Radient Silvergun not £130.

Now what happens, and I see this time and time again is that when a machine has support pulled lots of people become intrested in the machine as its cheap and the games are cheap, the same people that would not pay for it when it was new. Dreamcast anyone?

Its these people that are bitching and winging as they can't find a game that had a low print run during the machines life that they expect to be paying the sub five pounds they paid for most of thier games.

Harvest moon is a good case study. The initial print run was relatively small and so lots of people bought it and started claiming it's rarity. Prices rose on ebay but due to high sales another print run followed and harvest moon was suddenly near the top of the sales charts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*applauds 213*

On a separate note I'd say that Paper Mario is uncommon and definitely worth a fair amount due to being a late game, an RPG, a pseudo follow-up to the much moved Mario RPG on SNES, and featuring Nintendo's flagship character.

However - I'd suggest that PAL copies of Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine on N64 are rarer (although less desireable).

You mean there ARE Pal copies of Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine?

ME. WANT. NOW.

Also, what is "PCG's"???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, what is "PCG's"???

Copies of the magazine Personal Computer Games Sir, Chris Andersons original magazine - Evcery few Years He releases a new multi format mag, first pcg, then Ace then Edge....

At one time I NEVER thought I'd find copies of the magazine but thanks to Ebay I've completed that and my TV gamer collection, 2 things I gave far more of a toss about than "rare" games.... Sentimentality you see...

Good luck in finding that infernal machine on pal, I went to the Us last year and picked up Hawks 3 for the N64, still shocked that came out on the N64....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.