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It really is a proper sequel to The Karate Kid.

I love that the show adds further dimension to key characters.

And that they got original cast members!
But you don’t have to love the original films to enjoy it.

It’s a smartly crafted show that lays on the cheese it does contain all with a nod and a wink.

Thinking about other 80s-style heart-laden shows - dare I say that I like this more than Stranger Things?!

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3 minutes ago, Eighthours said:

Is it advantageous to watch all Karate Kid movies beforehand, or only the first one?

I've never seen the movies and only know what filtered into popular culture. Between that, and some small flashbacks to actual movie footage, I didn't feel I missed anything while watching the show.

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44 minutes ago, Eighthours said:

Is it advantageous to watch all Karate Kid movies beforehand, or only the first one?


No not at all. I’m not even sure there are references beyond the first movie, there aren’t in the first episode anyway. As John C said, there are enough flashbacks to keep you informed, and while it would be nice to be familiar with the characters it’s not essential. 

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16 hours ago, JohnC said:

I've never seen the movies and only know what filtered into popular culture. Between that, and some small flashbacks to actual movie footage, I didn't feel I missed anything while watching the show.

 

Read the synopsis on Wikipedia. Not one of the films is really worth watching. They're all very, very clichéd. Poor and weak kid, against the odds defeats a load of bullies and gets the girl.

It's basically Rocky for children.

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On 25/08/2019 at 20:52, DC said:

Rust Valley Restorers seems great one ep in, if you like a Wheeler Dealer-ish type thing. Looks great in 4K too.

 

EDIT: its great, I love it.

I binge watched 3 seasons of this last week.

 

It’s great, really well made. It’s less a custom car show than a story of a disjointed ‘family’ of employees and the community in the British Columbia countryside.

 

I’m sad I’ve finished because the crew are like family by the end. I even liked Avery despite his bumcrack being flaunted far too much. The Canadian accents are super cute. 
 

I don’t enjoy working on cars but after this I was thinking how fun it would be to have some projects. 
 

 

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5 hours ago, Shoes said:

Charlie Kaufman's new one is out today; I'm Thinking of Ending Things. Quite excited.

 

It's a bit of a slog but it sort of makes sense at the end. Special theory time!

 

 

Although we start off with the young woman, it's really Jake's story and he is also the old janitor. In fact, the young woman is just a composite made up of various women who have come into contact with Jake throughout his life, an idea wandering about in his head experiencing various memories and fantasties he had throughout the years; memories of his parents and fantasies about the idealised women he always wanted to be his girlfriend but who never were, because like Jud from Oklahoma! he was too weird and creepy to ever successfully manage a real relationship. I'd say that most things we hear about Jake are true, including his special achievment award at school, but although he enjoyed reading intellectual novels and poetry and occasionally attempting his own efforts at creating art, he never managed to assert himself properly and became bitter at the world, believeing that only the pretty people were allowed to have decent lives, eventually ending up in a janitorial position at his own high school, getting old and keeping himself warm with the hope that one day the perfect woman would come into his life, imagining all the conversations he never had with her, imagining being articulate enough to share his soul but never actually doing it in reality, and being self-aware enough to realise that these conversations would not always go perfectly well.

 


 

At the end of the film (end of his life?) old Jake the janitor has had his fantasies sparked once more by watching the rehearsal of Oklahoma! and as he is mopping the floor at school during the snowstorn, he finally comes to the understanding that, while he has liked to imagine himself as Curly, the romantic musical hero, he is actually Jud, the bad guy, who has never really loved in his life but has leered at women from a distance. Just like in the musical the dream ballet that happens near the end of the film replaces the main cast with more attractive dancers, and old Jake (Jud) finally destroys the illusion of young Jake (Curly) as the young woman disappears from his head and he allows himself to become the aging meat-bag that he always secretly knew he was and dies of hypothermia in his truck, maybe. But the sound of someone trying to start an engine at the end may indicate otherwise. Perhaps the final fantasy (you understand that reference) with Jake receiving his nobel prize in a hall full of people he once knew is an acknowledgement that, while he may have become The Creepy Janitor at school, his life still had meaning and he had an impact on people, even if it was just by keeping the hallways clean, The song he sings is, of course, Jud's Lament from Oklahoma! 

 

What's most interesting about this film to me is the choice to have this reverie be shown mostly from the perspective of the young woman, a character composited from the recollections that Jessie has had of the unatainable women in his life. If she appears confused and inconsistent in her behaviour then it is because she literally has multiple personalities and jumps back and forth through time according to what Jake is thinking about at the moment, at one point (I think) becoming the embodiment of scabrous film critic Pauline Kael - whose book we see in Jake's childhood bedroom - pouring her acidic scorn over 'Woman Under the Influence' during the second of the film's interminable composite car journeys. The conversation the young woman has with old Jake the janitor at the end describes the origin of her character, as Jake sees a woman at a bar and starts to fantasize about her, the snowball that started the avalanche that buries him at the end.

 

It's a very dense film and, if what I'm reading into it is true, a massive downer, but this is my take on it, and I've probably missed a lot out - for example, I'm not sure if we're meant to surmise that Jake was someone who was always only inches away from doing something horrible to women but held himself back, I don't know. Maybe the message is, at the end of it all, that even the lonely losers have a story to tell, however uncomfortable it may be to watch.

 

 

Well, that's my reambling mind dump done. I thought it was very dull in parts but got more interesting towards the end. Now go and watch Oklahoma!

Now I'm off to gather some other opinions and realise that what I wrote was a load of rubbish.

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I haven't watched yet, but I have read the book and what you've written there @Professor Puzzles does make some sense to me and my understanding from the book. I get where you're coming from.

 

Planning on watching it some time this weekend, although I was disappointed to hear today that Mayo & Kermode weren't impressed. 

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3 hours ago, Professor Puzzles said:

 

It's a bit of a slog but it sort of makes sense at the end. Special theory time!

 

  Reveal hidden contents

Although we start off with the young woman, it's really Jake's story and he is also the old janitor. In fact, the young woman is just a composite made up of various women who have come into contact with Jake throughout his life, an idea wandering about in his head experiencing various memories and fantasties he had throughout the years; memories of his parents and fantasies about the idealised women he always wanted to be his girlfriend but who never were, because like Jud from Oklahoma! he was too weird and creepy to ever successfully manage a real relationship. I'd say that most things we hear about Jake are true, including his special achievment award at school, but although he enjoyed reading intellectual novels and poetry and occasionally attempting his own efforts at creating art, he never managed to assert himself properly and became bitter at the world, believeing that only the pretty people were allowed to have decent lives, eventually ending up in a janitorial position at his own high school, getting old and keeping himself warm with the hope that one day the perfect woman would come into his life, imagining all the conversations he never had with her, imagining being articulate enough to share his soul but never actually doing it in reality, and being self-aware enough to realise that these conversations would not always go perfectly well.

 


 

At the end of the film (end of his life?) old Jake the janitor has had his fantasies sparked once more by watching the rehearsal of Oklahoma! and as he is mopping the floor at school during the snowstorn, he finally comes to the understanding that, while he has liked to imagine himself as Curly, the romantic musical hero, he is actually Jud, the bad guy, who has never really loved in his life but has leered at women from a distance. Just like in the musical the dream ballet that happens near the end of the film replaces the main cast with more attractive dancers, and old Jake (Jud) finally destroys the illusion of young Jake (Curly) as the young woman disappears from his head and he allows himself to become the aging meat-bag that he always secretly knew he was and dies of hypothermia in his truck, maybe. But the sound of someone trying to start an engine at the end may indicate otherwise. Perhaps the final fantasy (you understand that reference) with Jake receiving his nobel prize in a hall full of people he once knew is an acknowledgement that, while he may have become The Creepy Janitor at school, his life still had meaning and he had an impact on people, even if it was just by keeping the hallways clean, The song he sings is, of course, Jud's Lament from Oklahoma! 

 

What's most interesting about this film to me is the choice to have this reverie be shown mostly from the perspective of the young woman, a character composited from the recollections that Jessie has had of the unatainable women in his life. If she appears confused and inconsistent in her behaviour then it is because she literally has multiple personalities and jumps back and forth through time according to what Jake is thinking about at the moment, at one point (I think) becoming the embodiment of scabrous film critic Pauline Kael - whose book we see in Jake's childhood bedroom - pouring her acidic scorn over 'Woman Under the Influence' during the second of the film's interminable composite car journeys. The conversation the young woman has with old Jake the janitor at the end describes the origin of her character, as Jake sees a woman at a bar and starts to fantasize about her, the snowball that started the avalanche that buries him at the end.

 

It's a very dense film and, if what I'm reading into it is true, a massive downer, but this is my take on it, and I've probably missed a lot out - for example, I'm not sure if we're meant to surmise that Jake was someone who was always only inches away from doing something horrible to women but held himself back, I don't know. Maybe the message is, at the end of it all, that even the lonely losers have a story to tell, however uncomfortable it may be to watch.

 

 

Well, that's my reambling mind dump done. I thought it was very dull in parts but got more interesting towards the end. Now go and watch Oklahoma!

Now I'm off to gather some other opinions and realise that what I wrote was a load of rubbish.

Read the book, its phenomenal. Kaufman took some artistic license beyond its means with the end. The film has superb moments, particularly with the parents but holy shit the last 30 minutes is a rambling mess.

 

The book feels much more sinister and tight.

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1 hour ago, Thor said:

Just watched the first episode of Away. I only out it on to test because I was having issues with The Boys on Amazon Prime, but I rather enjoyed the first episode. Some decent human drama, and SPAAAAACE.

 

I've watched this tonight too, onto ep.2 now and I have to say, apart from some hokey acting in the first one, it's pretty good so far. 

 

The SPAAAAACE bits are great. And it seems to have a decent backstory too.

 

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35 minutes ago, Dark Soldier said:

Read the book, its phenomenal. Kaufman took some artistic license beyond its means with the end. The film has superb moments, particularly with the parents but holy shit the last 30 minutes is a rambling mess.

 

The book feels much more sinister and tight.

 

The last thirty minutes were my favourite part. :lol: I might have a read of the book just to see how it compares. 

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I haven’t read the book, but thought the last half hour was sublime. Absolutely loved this film.

 

As for Kermode. I find that I agree with him less and less as the years go by. Haven’t listened to his review yet, but he does have beef with Kaufman, and he does seem to be swayed by his like or dislike of a director.

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58 minutes ago, Bazjam said:

I haven’t read the book, but thought the last half hour was sublime. Absolutely loved this film.

 

As for Kermode. I find that I agree with him less and less as the years go by. Haven’t listened to his review yet, but he does have beef with Kaufman, and he does seem to be swayed by his like or dislike of a director.

 

What is Kermode's beef with Kaufman? I noticed an unflattering reference to Kermode in Kaufman's new book, but thought that was just a general extension of Kaufman's apparent attitude to critics in general as I looked it up and couldn't really see anything online about it.

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1 minute ago, imp said:

 

What is Kermode's beef with Kaufman? I noticed an unflattering reference to Kermode in Kaufman's new book, but thought that was just a general extension of Kaufman's apparent attitude to critics in general as I looked it up and couldn't really see anything online about it.

Yeah, Kermode tweeted about that in a stroppy way (for a critic he’s very touchy about criticism). And there was the very frosty interview between them when Kaufman was on the show talking about Anomalisa.

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On 03/09/2020 at 06:34, neoELITE said:

 

Read the synopsis on Wikipedia. Not one of the films is really worth watching. They're all very, very clichéd. Poor and weak kid, against the odds defeats a load of bullies and gets the girl.

It's basically Rocky for children.

 

I think the first is a great film - it follows the Rocky formula but then Rocky is a great film too so that's no bad thing. It's a better Rocky sequel than the actual Rocky sequels, in that respect, and Pat Morita gives a terrific performance.

 

The sequels are very much take it or leave it. 

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1 hour ago, Bazjam said:

I haven’t read the book, but thought the last half hour was sublime. Absolutely loved this film.

 

As for Kermode. I find that I agree with him less and less as the years go by. Haven’t listened to his review yet, but he does have beef with Kaufman, and he does seem to be swayed by his like or dislike of a director.


If you actually listen to the review, Kermode makes it clear that he thinks Kaufman is a genius and has made some fantastic films, although he was not completely sold on this new movie. In fact it is Simon Mayo who launches into a rant about what a load of self indulgent drivel it is.

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Kaufman I think, or the other person in the interview about Anomolisa, famously told the UK's most popular film podcast that films are "a succession of still images" it was a running joke for a while and I got the impression they just didn't get on.

 

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I know there’s not many Peter Bradshaw fans on here, but I really liked this line from his review.

 

“You can spend up to an hour wondering uneasily when this film is going to start, while also realising that you have been on the edge of your seat.”

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