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You could allow autofire for a period. i.e. a burst fire mode as default. So you hold space and it rapid fires until you 'overheat'. The overheat can be displayed by filling up the graphic of your ship.

 

Or the opposite representation would probably make more sense. Make your ship solid; and as it expends 'auto fire bullets' it's colour is drained. Not holding space causes your ship, and therefore your rapid fire ability, to refill. This relieves some of the tapping tedium and also adds a mechanic.

 

Not sure that idea is any good but it's something to try if you feel you have nothing to work on.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I wonder if anyone can help with a Unity query.

 

I've been working on a prototype for a game and I did a build of it, it uses a terrain, but after the build the terrain is not textured.  I guess for some reason the textures are not included in the build, but I don't know why this would be.

 

If someone could point me in the right direction that'd be great

 

Thanks,

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A month or so ago we secured a little funding to develop a project which we're really excited about. We have essentially show proof of our continued development and progress each month which we've decided to turn into a video dev diary (I don't think 2 player productions will be worried about us taking over their good work anytime soon!)

 

how do you embed video?... I'm sure this worked the last time I did it! 

 

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For some reason I can't stop giggling at the 200 sausages per minute line in that video.

 

I've been dabbling with Unity of late and enjoy it, but I've come to the conclusion that I'll never be able to create my own game because I just can't draw.

 

Tried Pixel Art and suck at it. Tried Isometric art with Hexels 2, suck at that too. Even creating anything other than very basic child-like Vector art is beyond me because the creative part of my brain is so shrivelled. I get frustrated that I can't interpret the visual concepts and designs in my head into something meaningful on the screen. Lots of cool ideas and themes but no way of translating that into something that will be unique enough to catch peoples attention.

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16 hours ago, Spatial said:

I've been dabbling with Unity of late and enjoy it, but I've come to the conclusion that I'll never be able to create my own game because I just can't draw.

 

Don't let that be a barrier, man. There are plenty of ways to get by, from sticking at it until you get something half reasonable, to working solely with abstract shapes (look at Thomas Was Alone for an example of how even simple blocks do an excellent job), to focusing on gameplay and working with an artist later. Stick figures and pencil scribbles alone are enough to get the ball rolling, or there's the option of using free art as a stop gap.

 

No game comes to life in its beautiful final form. I mean, here's Braid during development:

 

dBFSw5j.png 

 

Jonathan Blow can't draw for shit. But he cobbled together enough to work with and bring the gameplay together while - and I appreciate this isn't always an option - hiring an artist to do what he can't.

 

You probably can't afford to hire an artist. That's cool. But you can sure as shit draw as well as Blow can, and that's enough for you to make a game and then worry about bringing the art together at the end by any means possible. Don't let it become a barrier to your own progress, basically.

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Thanks - that's quite encouraging advice. I'd seen the video of Mike Bithell talking about Thomas Was Alone and his lack of artistic ability but didn't know Jonathan Blow was the same (that picture is hilarious when you think of how stylised Braid ended up).

 

Going to be hard to try and remove that visual reliance from my brain and just hammer out those concepts into a working form. I think that's because the visual WIP is always so far away from the final image I have in my head that it's hard to see how it will all fall into place. Guess it's all part of realising how games design is a long road and not as simple as people think it is to just throw something together.

 

 

 

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On 24/08/2016 at 18:33, Spatial said:

 

I've been dabbling with Unity of late and enjoy it, but I've come to the conclusion that I'll never be able to create my own game because I just can't draw.

 

 

You can do a lot to set up locations and a sense of atmosphere with very little actual artistic ability. A while back I came up with a set of very basic tiles (literally just geometric shapes) for playing around and doing the tile map equivalent of grey boxing. If you've ever built stuff out of lego you're basically fine:

 

generic+mockup1.png?format=1000w

 

generic+tiles+v1.png?format=1000w

 

I've done art for a bunch of indie games (mostly unreleased but a couple that have made it out into the real world) and it drives me mad when a developer I'm working for is waiting for actual finished art to implement things in their game. Where the working relationship allows for it I always push the developer to implement as much as they can as quickly as possible with junk art but it's rare that people ever do.

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Wow. Crazy that a developer would wait for finished art to implement features. Very rarely is anything implemented 100% correctly first time, there are always bugs etc...

 

Gamedevs need to try out ideas as fast as possible to see whether they actually work or play as well as first imagined.

Edited by Jonathan_Kerr
Clarified final sentence.
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2 hours ago, Jonathan_Kerr said:

Wow. Crazy that a developer would wait for finished art to implement features. Very rarely is anything implemented 100% correctly first time, there are always bugs etc...

 

Gamedevs need to try out ideas as fast as possible to see whether they actually work or play as well as first imagined.

 

Most of the work I do in games is from jobs advertised on forums, the level of professionalism and experience varies massively.

 

Lurking around in the shallow end of the industry I'm constantly seeing the same mistakes repeated from project to project. I wish there was some kind of game dev. equivalent to Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics that I could just throw at people...

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Maybe there's an opportunity there? There's tonnes of hand holding tutorials out there on the technical side and scene creation etc but I can't say I've seen many go properly in-depth about overarching lessons learned and pitfalls to avoid.

 

Maybe you could create that guide to throw at people? I'd probably be first in line for a smack in the head from it :)

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On 28/08/2016 at 19:48, Spatial said:

Maybe there's an opportunity there? There's tonnes of hand holding tutorials out there on the technical side and scene creation etc but I can't say I've seen many go properly in-depth about overarching lessons learned and pitfalls to avoid.

 

Maybe you could create that guide to throw at people? I'd probably be first in line for a smack in the head from it :)

 

I've been thinking about this over the past few days... I like the idea of hammering something together but I'd have to find the right tone, I'd feel like a fraud if it came off as too authoritative and there's a danger of it ending up as a list of "don't do this, don't do that and for god's sake don't do this!"

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My current game is made with Game Maker. You can do some pretty sweet stuff with it and I think it has a bit of a reputation hangover from it's very early days? Hotline Miami, Nuclear Throne and Hyper Light Drifter were all made with it.

 

Obviously it has some limitations - one of which is there's no Mac version and it doesn't support retina (I don't think). But pretty good option if you're not using Unity.

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Hi all,

 

Got an issue with my game and am trying to reduce the size of the game. The culprit is the animations and how I’ve done them. Basically they are rendered sprites from 3D models, that have been compressed to about 128 colours via ImageOptim. 

 

You can pick one of 10 players, x 3 ethnicities per team (caucasian, african and asian) x14 animations per character, x 8-12 frames of animation. All up, about 2000-odd frames, I think = approx 200 MB of animations.

 

Yup, admittedly this wasn’t the best way to do it, but the game evolved over time and we ended up allowing players to be any of the ethnicities regardless of what team you were playing as (i.e., you could be an Asian Australian, or of African descent playing for England, NZ etc...) Unfortunately, I didn’t know Esoteric Software’s Spine and I thought that having a greyscale render, and overlaying colour layers was going to be too difficult to align properly. 

 

So my question is, what are the approaches I can use to reduce the size of the game (specifically animations)? Here’s some thoughts I’ve had - what are your thoughts?

 

- Scale the sprites down by 50% and scaled them up by the same amount in the game engine. I want to avoid this if I can, because I don’t want the graphics to degrade too much. The game will come in around 100MB tho.

 

- I’ll probably take some of the animations out for each team, taking them down from 14 to 10 animations per character. But this won’t be enough on its own.

 

- Re-render the sprites, but split into a generic body with a uniform where the player cannot see the skin colour on the arm and then render the heads separately. Probably a bit of manual work with this and not sure if we can align the head to the body easily?

 

- Is it possible to upload the game to the App or Google Play store without the batting sprites? Then, when the player creates the character at the start of the game, we would show a short loading screen (“building character”) where the game would download only the sprites needed (about a 8MB file). Is this possible? This way, the sprites could remain hi-res and the overall game size would be lower. 

 

- The downside is that there could be a 15-30 second delay as the game downloads the sprites, or if the player doesn’t have internet access at that point in the game, they won’t be able to play. Personally, I don’t see it as this as any different to a game like Clash Royale which requires you to be connected when you start. The only difference is that my game would require this only once (when you build a character at the start). I’m not sure if this is doable in GM: Studio and do people hate this idea (a short loading screen the first time you play the game).

 

So yeah, would welcome any thoughts. Unfortunately, because I want to release in a couple of months in time for cricket season (southern hemisphere), it’s not really possible to switch engines or animation systems.

Apologies for rubbish grammar - writing this at work.

 

T20CC-Screenshot-3-Game-HitRuns.jpg

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Surprised to see an open world 3d FPS made in clickteam fusion.

 

Anyway, bought that and the gamemaker bundle. Once I can get a decent windows laptop I can start making this junk.

 

My first project is a multiplayer single room brawler/co-op game like Towerfall. Hopefully I can get some sort of online working in it.

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22 hours ago, Jonathan_Kerr said:

- Is it possible to upload the game to the App or Google Play store without the batting sprites? Then, when the player creates the character at the start of the game, we would show a short loading screen (“building character”) where the game would download only the sprites needed (about a 8MB file). Is this possible? This way, the sprites could remain hi-res and the overall game size would be lower. 

 

- The downside is that there could be a 15-30 second delay as the game downloads the sprites, or if the player doesn’t have internet access at that point in the game, they won’t be able to play. Personally, I don’t see it as this as any different to a game like Clash Royale which requires you to be connected when you start. The only difference is that my game would require this only once (when you build a character at the start). I’m not sure if this is doable in GM: Studio and do people hate this idea (a short loading screen the first time you play the game).

 

I don't have any experience with developing apps (so probably shouldn't be replying) but I do know that Android apps support the use of expansion files, which seems to be the kind of thing you're describing. You download the base file from the Play Store and then when the app is run for the first time it downloads the expansion file(s). For example, The Bard's Tale gives you the option of downloading Standard Def assets (1.8GB) or High Def assests (3.5GB) the first time you open it. Whatever choice you make there's quite a few minutes delay while you wait for it to download, so your download would be nothing compared to that.

 

Being up front about a one-time download could be slightly less frustrating to a user as loading screens (whether it's described as that or not) or the mention of needing an internet connection (when the game is presumably not reliant on it to play) might give the wrong impression. 

 

I believe Google will host these files for free from what I've read, although I'm not sure that was always the case. I'm not sure how Apple handle it. 

 

I personally wouldn't skimp on the quality of the graphics unless really necessary.

 

There's an article on YoYo Games about using expansion files http://help.yoyogames.com/hc/en-us/articles/216753468-Using-APK-Expansions-With-Google-Play

 

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