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The Game Development Thread


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23 minutes ago, robdood said:

Is that still the voxel one, yeah? Looks so freaking great man, the style is so *chef's kiss* 

 

Adore :wub:

 

Yeah still voxels, trying our hardest to make it look anything but your typical voxel based game tho, more and more low poly bits, pixel art textures and depth of field effects are creeping in.

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As for me - I'm still beavering away at Fightman(working title)..  It's just I'm immersed in code this time and trying to plan things out a lot more, so theres little progress to see visually. 

 

I've almost finished my first Hierarchical Finite State Machine, which has been way more fun to make than I anticipated, mainly because I've managed to so neatly encapsulate the behaviours for my combat system.  It's immensely satisfying. 

 

Next plan is to hook it up to a (yet to be created) input manager so I can at least test the state flows using debug log / text outputs.

 

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I'm making a bit of a diablo type thing.

 

 

I'm just adding player animations for attacks and enemy health, then the basic bare bones of the combat are done. I'm going to add some cooldown based magic attacks and an inventory of some kind but I'm pretty happy with it so far.

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39 minutes ago, SeanR said:

Day/night cycle? Cool!


It’s one of those features I just irrationally love. I’d really like dynamic weather and maybe seasonal changes as well but I’m mostly focused on why after I attack it won’t let me attack a second time at the moment. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I didn't go back to the Space Invader clone I was making. I lost interest, as I tend to in these things. It takes too long and I don't see results quick enough so the brain flips the table and goes "fuck this shit". I did some tutorials on RPG maker but I've got an old version and there doesn't seem to be that many that are actually any good so it looks like that's going to go out the window too. It looks versatile if you just want to make a 16 bit JRPG but not much else. I did have a stack of fun writing dialogue for a nun NPC

 

 

So now I'm going to move back to Unity or Game Maker or something. Or I'll get bored again. I do have a card game I was going to make years ago in a drawer somewhere, maybe I should go and do that.

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Well I am so tired. Unfortunately we didn’t win but I got a really good prototype out of it in 36 hours. I’ll put up a video of the finished thing once I’ve slept, but I’ve been programming for a day and a half and I’m fucking knackered. 

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2 hours ago, moosegrinder said:

I did some tutorials on RPG maker but I've got an old version and there doesn't seem to be that many that are actually any good so it looks like that's going to go out the window too. It looks versatile if you just want to make a 16 bit JRPG but not much else. I did have a stack of fun writing dialogue for a nun NPC

 


It is extremely limited in what it can do. It’s not just that it only does JRPGs, it’s also very limited in how much you can even customise that. Something like Grandia would be a big ask, it basically does SNES FF or Dragon Quest. Unless that’s exactly what you want to do, it’s not a great programme, though I do know that there’s more plugins for some of the older versions that let you mix it up more. 
 

Have you tried UE4 at all?

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6 hours ago, Broker said:


It is extremely limited in what it can do. It’s not just that it only does JRPGs, it’s also very limited in how much you can even customise that. Something like Grandia would be a big ask, it basically does SNES FF or Dragon Quest. Unless that’s exactly what you want to do, it’s not a great programme, though I do know that there’s more plugins for some of the older versions that let you mix it up more. 
 

Have you tried UE4 at all?

No, I tried to start small and I sucked at that so I kind of chucked it off before I started. I do this a lot. I did get Unity installed and had a look at it. The missus has a Lynda account so I should look on there for tutorials but I'll probably bump up against the same roadblocks indie with TIC 80 and what not. I have very little patience and you need patience for this stuff it seems. I might give Unity a stab over the weekend.

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5 hours ago, moosegrinder said:

No, I tried to start small and I sucked at that so I kind of chucked it off before I started. I do this a lot. I did get Unity installed and had a look at it. The missus has a Lynda account so I should look on there for tutorials but I'll probably bump up against the same roadblocks indie with TIC 80 and what not. I have very little patience and you need patience for this stuff it seems. I might give Unity a stab over the weekend.


I think it’s easy to get into a headspace where you think that you’re not cut out for development because it isn’t clicking for you. I’ve been dabbling for years, from Dark Basic to Unreal and Half Life maps, through RPG Maker and Game Maker and into my first attempts with Unity and UE4. When I’ve given up on things in the past, I’ve often thought that maybe I’m just not suited to game development, because I keep trying but it never sticks. 
 

One thing I’ve found recently, is that it’s really just about finding something that feels comfortable and sticking at it no matter how crap you feel about it. If you’ve got the patience for hundreds of hours of the same game, or to learn an instrument, or to learn to draw, you’ve got the patience for game development. The fact you’ve repeatedly tried it says just as much about you as the fact you’ve given up, and whilst it’s tempting to spend time thinking about how much better you could be by now if one of those attempts had stuck, you can’t change the past. 
 

I found that going back to Uni was hugely helpful, but I think any course will help. It’s almost better to not use an existing account or 90% off Udemy course, because the commitment of paying money for something can help guilt you into doing it. In my first year we did some 3D design and some coding and I hated being the programmer. But as I’ve applied myself more to those things I’m finding them more and more enjoyable. I’ve never really stuck at anything or tried before, often because I’m scared of failing, but the people who are good aren’t natural savants, they’ve just kept on plugging away. 
 

I’d suggest keeping on trying things, and give UE4 a go. It’s very easy to get something basic running and start messing with it, which helped me. The visual scripting lays all the code out in nodes and is much easier to parse than written code. It’s easy to import your own art and implement it. You’re an incredibly talented artist, you’d be amazing at drawing textures, and even if doing the whole thing isn’t for you, you could do bits and pieces or join a team or enter a game jam and you’d be really valuable. Don’t give up!

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So my game jam experience was pretty amazing. We had 36 hours to produce a demo, teams of 4-8 people (we had 7). The theme was sustainability with our team being asked to focus on energy. I did programming only, so had pretty much no input on the design side and didn't participate in any of the research (pretty much just focused on coding for the whole time outside of sleeping for 6 hours). I did suggest a 3rd person character driven game, because that's what I'm most comfortable with, but all the design aspects were taken out of my hands which was actually really liberating. I wouldn't have made the choices the team did with regards to graphics, names etc but that wasn't my problem and I really enjoyed firing on all cylinders for a day and a half to see how much we could get done from scratch.

 

Here's the final video of our project:

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I know it goes slightly against the idea of solo efforts, but having all the artistic or 3d modelling prowess of a dead-hamster - I was looking into some Assets to help with content creation and picked up a few in the recent Unity sale.

 

In a poll, the users of my sim said they most wanted another level, so I decided to create a bigger and more interesting cityscape (as my current one has a few sparse buildings) I tried an Asset called Cscape which seems to lack almost completely in documentation aside from a few videos the author made 3 years ago and struggled along with in broken english.

 

But essentially it's a case of setting how big you want your city to be, hit generate and it comes up with something nice.  From that point you can easily edit any of the building individually - in terms of size, look, etc, and obviously delete things or put other stuff in.  I've stuck a test level into my sim and it performs pretty well.  I resisted turning on all the bells and whistles with added post-processing and I've kept street lights and trees out of the city for now as they are just things you'd collide with.  The included scripts will detect when you've moved the lighting away and turn the lights on which gives an excuse to fly at night.

 

 

 

Also..... can any of you guys give the Quad-ball game a try to see how it feels?  From the sim point of view, I'm hearing that people seem scared of the difficulty level - and I'm not sure if this is because it's a) too difficult, b) sim people aren't gamers so don't like any repeated failure or c) it's just not fun for anyone.

 

Always difficult to tell when you've come up with it yourself and think it's pretty fun.  On the downside, flying with a regular xbox/ps4 joystick is much more difficult than a traditional RC radio (but there's an option to choose joypad to make the throttle a bit easier) but if you can get the regular flying under control, then you shouldn't have a problem.

 

Here's an example level of the game -

 

 

You can pick the whole sim (which includes the game part) for free on github here https://github.com/CurryKitten/CurryKitten-Sim/releases/tag/0.54-Beta

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4 hours ago, CurryKitten said:

Also..... can any of you guys give the Quad-ball game a try to see how it feels?  From the sim point of view, I'm hearing that people seem scared of the difficulty level - and I'm not sure if this is because it's a) too difficult, b) sim people aren't gamers so don't like any repeated failure or c) it's just not fun for anyone.

 

 

I've never flown anything like this so bear than in mind with my feedback. I've also not looked into control configurations, so the feedback below is based on the two presets. I'm not sure how much use it is.

 

In Radio control mode I'm largely useless. I can get the craft close to the ball, but by the time I get there I'm rarely in a state to do anything useful with it. I can understand what I want the craft to do, but I've got many years of FPS controls ingrained in my system and so I really struggle to achieve anything. I want all my "look-around" controls on the same stick, basically, so was constantly rolling when I wanted to be yawing. I haven't got anywhere near enough control to even begin to know what I'd want roll for, and yet I keep instinctively doing it, because I want yaw coupled with pitch.

 

In Gamepad mode, I much preferred the throttle being an active thing, but I still struggled from the same issues with the controls I wanted being split across two sticks.

 

If I can remap the sticks the way I'd want them to be, and maybe just disable roll for now (maybe as a beginner's option) then I think I'd be in with a shout (as I said I haven't looked at the options, so maybe this is all already doable). Sounds very negative, but I hope it's helpful.

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1 hour ago, MarkN said:

I've never flown anything like this so bear than in mind with my feedback. I've also not looked into control configurations, so the feedback below is based on the two presets. I'm not sure how much use it is.

 

In Radio control mode I'm largely useless. I can get the craft close to the ball, but by the time I get there I'm rarely in a state to do anything useful with it. I can understand what I want the craft to do, but I've got many years of FPS controls ingrained in my system and so I really struggle to achieve anything. I want all my "look-around" controls on the same stick, basically, so was constantly rolling when I wanted to be yawing. I haven't got anywhere near enough control to even begin to know what I'd want roll for, and yet I keep instinctively doing it, because I want yaw coupled with pitch.

 

In Gamepad mode, I much preferred the throttle being an active thing, but I still struggled from the same issues with the controls I wanted being split across two sticks.

 

If I can remap the sticks the way I'd want them to be, and maybe just disable roll for now (maybe as a beginner's option) then I think I'd be in with a shout (as I said I haven't looked at the options, so maybe this is all already doable). Sounds very negative, but I hope it's helpful.

 

This was always the fear - I think that a regular gamer could destroy the game, but the act of flying is different than normal.  I thought I was immune to this, just played through Last of Us 2 and no problem with move/look on the sticks, but just trying out Subnautica today and my mind is screwed up because yaw and roll are reversed and I keep hitting things in the little sub-thingy.

 

But yes, you can remap the sticks - either use the remap button in the radio/joystick setup screen, or go into the advanced page from their and you can reallocate each axis as you go.  The no roll idea is an interesting one - perhaps mixing in roll and yaw to complete a coordinated turn.  For now you could also try in autolevel mode (press m) so the quad always comes back to centre if you let go of the sticks.

 

Appreciate you having a go and giving some feedback - most useful.

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  • 2 months later...

I hope everyone is still developing out there :)  I wondered if anyone has tried getting anything onto the Apple App or Google Play store.  I've been working away on the mobile versions of my sim, and bloody hell jumping through the amount of hoops presented to me was a nightmare!

 

Since I figured it where some of you guys were also going towards, here's my experience of both so far (as of the time of writing, the app is approved on Google play and has finally been submitted for review on Apple's app store (with the testflight version getting an approval)

 

Google Play

There's a single one-off payment of $25 to become an Android developer and distribute via their app store.  I like a 1-off payment, so no real arguments there.  I had about a day of head scratching + googling to find out what changes I needed to make.  I'd been making my own .apk files from Unity for a while and testing on my own device, but by default Unity kicked out a backend of Mono, which didn't produce an ARM64 architecture and did produce an x86 one (which we didn't need/want)  I thought I would need to sign my own builds at build time, but there's basically an option to get google to do it after you upload stuff - so yay.

 

However, I upload my apk and it tells me npe, that's too big.  It has a max size of 150MB and my build is 500MB.  It mentions I should use the new/improved .AAB files, so I try this and it still complains it's too big.  Some researching later and I discovered the option in Unity to split the executable which creates a small .apk file of the first scene and the remainder in an .OBB file (the extension file as it calls it)  I finally get that uploaded and it tells me that I'm targeting the wrong version of Android and must be on the latest.  But changing that means I need to find the latest Android NDK and point the Unity build process at it.  But with that fixed it was all good.  

 

There's some useful things to help test your app.  I created myself an internal test group and entered in the email addresses of some people that tried out the version for me - you send them a link and they download a version from the Play store that can't be searched for.  I picked up a few bugs here, made the changes and after uploading a bunch of screenshots and app descriptions I submitted for review and it came back as ok in a few days.  Fairly painless, although from next month the Play store insists on you using .AAB versions of your apps, so not sure how to handle the larger size as yet.

 

Apple App Store

Cards on the table, I'm in the Apple bubble so to speak.  I work off an iMac, we have a few Macbook Airs in the house and everyone has an iPhone.  However, I've found the act of getting the app just at the submission stage for review pure ball ache.  First off, becoming an Apple Developer will cost you £79 a year.  Stop paying and any apps you did put on the store will be pulled... nice.

 

Building for an iPhone from Unity was already quite involved.  You'd do the regular build in Unity that would create an Xcode project, and then you'd have to open that Xcode project (not sure how you develop if you are using Windows) and create yourself a personal developer signing certificate in order to get it onto your own phone (where it would expire after 7 days) You don't need to be a paid up developer to test on your own iPhone, but it takes some time to sort out.

 

For Apple, you need to request a Distribution signing certificate from your of keystore and get this to Apple who issues you with the cert that you put back in your keystore.  The idea is that Xcode then uses this when you tell it to upload directly to the app store.  At first I thought this sounded nifty, until the cert didn't work and it kept telling me my key wasn't there (when i could see it was).  I managed to (finally) work around this by creating a provisioning profile and getting a specific iOS app store singing cert to sign things manually.  I was so happy when it started to say "uploading" until it broke and told me it wasn't going to.

 

Why not, well a similar issue to the Play Store tell ing me I needed to target the latest version of Android, which meant downloading an NDK.  In theory it was the same thing, I needed a later version of the iOS SDK - however, Apple had tied this to very specific versions of Xcode, and they also tied versions of Xcode into their MacOS versions - I was on MacOS Mojave (which I'd stayed on as it's the last MacOS to allow running 32 bit apps).  I went through setting up a VM running Catalina to try the build, but that failed with "unknown errors" which I guess must have been some quirk of the VM.  So my only way forward was to bite the bullet and upgrade my OS.  Who knew so many of my apps were 32-bit.  About 70% of my Steam library disappeared and every program from Adobe (to be fair those weren't kosha versions),  Anyway, with all this done I was finally able to upload to the App store (albeit still with manual signing)

 

Testing on the app store is similarly, you can test via the TestFlight app, but even your test builds need to go through an approval process so it was 48 hours before I could get anyone else to test for me.  They app store also requires a link to a privacy policy.... even for something which doesn't take any personal data.  So I had to hastily generate an online version and stick it on a website to link to!

 

Worse were the screen shots it required.  I'd tested this on my iPhone XR and recorded some vide so I could then take screen grabs of certain points... no, says Apple, you have to provide screen shots that match the exact resolution of a 6.5" iphone, so I resized them (as the aspect was the same)and then pressed submit.  Hey, says Apple, where are your pictures for a 5.5" iphone and a 12.9" iPad.  These I couldn't resize as the aspect ratio would stretch horribly.  I tried running the emulator from Xcode but due to the graphical intensity I was getting about 1 frame every 4 seconds which made things tricky.  So I ended up faking these screenshots by running unity and having the exact resolution needed in the game window.  not perfect as there's elements that don't quite render correctly, but better than nothing.  So I've finally been able to submit that for approval - just an awful process on Apple.

 

ANyone else been and done this - did it go smoother, any hints for the future?

 

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On 01/07/2021 at 15:23, CurryKitten said:

 

Building for an iPhone from Unity was already quite involved.  You'd do the regular build in Unity that would create an Xcode project, and then you'd have to open that Xcode project (not sure how you develop if you are using Windows)

 


It might have changed but last time I checked you couldn’t, you could only create iOS apps using a Mac and there was no Windows option. 

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1 hour ago, Broker said:


It might have changed but last time I checked you couldn’t, you could only create iOS apps using a Mac and there was no Windows option. 

It looks that way - I don't know if you can run a MacOS VM  from a Windows host, but I seemed to have issues running some aspects of Xcode in a VM with MacOS as a host, so I'd imagine it would be difficult.  

 

It used to be much easier in the olden days.  Microsoft were the big evil, and Apple was a fresh hip brand which felt like you were escaping from the crowd.  These days Bill Gates is trying to single-handedly save the world, and Apple is out to screw you as much as possible!

 

My app got rejected on it's first attempt... because the 3 preview clips for the 5.5" version were placed in a frame so that the aspect ratio was retained and the footage wasn't stretched.  So there was a black border top/bottom - I used it to add some titles.  Apple says no, this doesn't represent a real experience.  *sigh*  Took these out, resubmitted and it's finally come back as approved.

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  • 1 month later...

As ever, I feel a little bit embarrassed wandering into this thread given the quality of other posters' output, but keeping a bit of a log of what I do does help to keep me going. So:

 

I took part in a gamejam the week before last; the Self Care Jam, run as part of a research project by the University of Nottingham, and sponsored by the National Videogame Museum.

 

As the name suggests, the focus was on making a game or tool that would explore themes of self care and/or mental health more broadly. And, as the subject matter might suggest, it wasn't run as the stereotypical hyperfocussed sprint of a jam, as a key part of its concerns was ensuring that jammers weren't damaging their own wellbeing by taking part.

 

Instead of a couple of days of crammed development, the jam was spread across a week; and instead of a single theme to run through, a toolkit was provided — a 40+ page pdf and a deck of cards, covering a range of self-care and mental health themes — to help develop ideas. Monday-Thursday featured two one-hour slots each day for exploring specific concepts as a group; the Friday was a two hour kick-off to come up with final concepts (all set up to allow people to attend at least one a day without needing to take time off work); then there were two four-hour slots on Saturday and Sunday in which to develop the concept and, optionally, create a prototype version.

 

It was very, very different from jams I've followed before. It was also really, really enjoyable; everyone was so engaged with the subject, and free to talk about and explore different issues rather than focus on the practical side of things, that it gave the whole thing an exceptionally cooperative flavour. And it allowed people to come up with really interesting concepts — from out-there, speculative design of what if ideas (e.g. one person came up with a fictional 'Mind OS', which they then created a virtual prototype of it); to feasible, fully developed concepts where only developed as concepts; to silly little practical things.

 

I went more down the silly little practical thing route; I didn't join a team (being a mediocre generalist meant I felt uncomfortable filling a slot that actual specialists could do better in), and decided what I could do by splitting my concept development and practical development 50:50 across the alotted time. Net result: I put together a concept for a sort-of-inverse city builder on the Saturday, gave myself a whopping 30 minutes to draw all the assets I'd need for a prototype (bear in mind here that I am an abysmal artist even with time on my side), then three and a half hours to code something up. The final prototype came out exactly as aesthetically pleasing and fully featured as you'd expect, and I enjoyed every minute of it. When it came to presenting our ideas, this was how I displayed the game concept (please brace yourself for programmer art of the highest calibre):


 

Spoiler


1573959170_Jampresentation.thumb.png.018ce1a0c17d35dc88e885923af1be3c.png

(I feel compelled to note that the favourite of my terrible puns in that set of screenshots — yes, even better than the sort-of-legible Notional Car Parks — is unreadable in said screenshots. So, for the curious, the building on the right is obviously Brutish Home Stores)

 

Moving swiftly on. I enjoyed the concept, and with the jam over figured I'd actually take the idea and start building it (from scratch, as the prototype was built at speed to work as a prototype, not as a foundation). And I've been working on it a little in the evenings — this weekend was busy (a family visit and hanging out with a friend, deeply exciting by the standards of the past 16 months), but I've still managed to make a pleasing amount of progress, even if only on the very basics.

 

Y'see, the thing about the game is that I very firmly believe that the best look for a city builder — particularly one being developed solo by someone with... limited artistic skill — involves the use of axonometric projection. And obviously, the natural engine to use for that would be Unity, what with it natively supporting orthographic projections and what with 3D models being easy to use to create chunky, pretty tiles and buildings.

 

So naturally I decided to use Gamemaker for my purposes instead.

 

So, this week I've worked on putting together a simple set of scripts that will allow me to take a flat tile layer:

 

Tilemap.png.c21cd55b3389b13047eea05362c75aa4.png

 

And use that to spawn a series of object tiles, transformed onto axonometric projection, ideally while semi-randomising the sprites used to allow for easy visual variation. And lo, the above tilemap now outputs this:

 

1243147051_AxonometricMap.thumb.png.c5deafc8b2ed650f4bffe97e0ece60d1.png

 

And, just as important, I need to be able to move the camera around said newly-projected landscape; ideally both through digital input (at the moment, simple WASD), and also via click-and-drag; and also ideally with careful controls to ensure the camera doesn't ever travel too far. And that's worked out pretty well too (please ignore the fuzziest recording quality imaginable):

 

 

All in all, I'm quite pleased with myself, given none of the above are things I've tried to do with a game before (well, bar scrolling a camera with WASD), and given I've not touched GML in a couple of years.

 

Next steps: actual interactions. As in, being able to click on the map and place things where you expect them to go, and so on.

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  • 7 months later...

Hallo lovely Unity aware humans.

 

As some will know I'm a games art teacher for most of the week - and have recently started a new role (which is fab) which also sees me working with students in a more relational/encouraging role across a wider games dev process. 

 

So far so good, I worked in the games industry for a decade so through osmosis have picked up a bit across the board but I've got a couple of students struggling with a couple of Unity needs that I can't help them with currently and need some wisdom.

 

So if anyone's around at the moment (or between today and tomorrow) and able to point me in the direction of how to add the animation frames from a 3d model to a Unity game scene (some aren't working, some are playing frame 1 throughout interaction). 

 

or, more importantly at the moment, navigation/AI pathfinding. 

 

Any help on either MUCH appreciated. 

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I'd love to help, but those are two areas I genuinely know nothing about. I'm going to need to get around to the animation at some point in the future, but until now I've always faked it in a Minecraft rotate-the-limbs style (although mine is much nicer).

 

On the pathfinding front is just pointing them at the asset store an option? There's some free assets available with decent ratings...

 

https://assetstore.unity.com/?free=true&q=pathfinding&orderBy=1

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 22/03/2022 at 12:40, c-cat114 said:

Hallo lovely Unity aware humans.

 

As some will know I'm a games art teacher for most of the week - and have recently started a new role (which is fab) which also sees me working with students in a more relational/encouraging role across a wider games dev process. 

 

So far so good, I worked in the games industry for a decade so through osmosis have picked up a bit across the board but I've got a couple of students struggling with a couple of Unity needs that I can't help them with currently and need some wisdom.

 

So if anyone's around at the moment (or between today and tomorrow) and able to point me in the direction of how to add the animation frames from a 3d model to a Unity game scene (some aren't working, some are playing frame 1 throughout interaction). 

 

or, more importantly at the moment, navigation/AI pathfinding. 

 

Any help on either MUCH appreciated. 

 

Way too late 

but there are tonnes of good guides for this sort of thing

like 

 

https://learn.unity.com/tutorial/unity-navmesh#5c7f8528edbc2a002053b497

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  • 4 months later...

This week I've dived into trying to do some game development, or learning to.

 

I've often started over the years but as a developer I'm a bit averse to using the big all singing/dancing engines because I like to know how things work, have complete control and enjoy some of the lower level bits and bobs. But the reality is of course that it's too much. So much time is spent making the game loop and deciding how that should work that nothing actually emerges.

 

The furthest I got in the past was a 2D blob platformer prototype where I used Cocos2D-X/Box2D.

 

 

This time I've decided to just pick up an engine so I can start producing something much more quickly. I've selected Godot based on the fact that the others seem a bit heavier and I like the sort of project it is. So far it's been good fun and easy to get up and running. I started with their 2D tutorial to build the "Dodge the Creeps" game which I think is a very good introduction to basic concepts.

 

From there I've started building a top down 2D game about being a bee. Really enjoying the process and happy with how things are coming along. All random sprites and tilesets at the moment but it's amazing how much difference that makes over just having coloured squares moving around.

 

 

It's fun playing with the little touches that may not stay but force me to understand different little concepts:

  • Preserve direction when moving between the overworld and flowers and back again (pass data between the two scenes)
  • Set position on the flower based on your arrival rotation (use of a PathFollow2D to apply rotation and select a position)

Some next steps:

  • change the map to have flowers spawning randomly over time
  • player consumes pollen from the flower when they're on it
  • display how much pollen a flower has on the overworld map with an aura or something
  • remove flowers after some timer
  • different flower visuals
  • a maximum amount of pollen the bee can carry (and maybe make the player slower)
  • a beehive the bee can visit to deposit the pollen
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