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Good new horror films


squirtle
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I watched the new Blair witch yesterday. Doesn't do anything the original didn't do better. A shame because there is potential for a good sequel.

 

Also watched Train to Busan, that was pretty good I thought. It doesn't break any new ground but manages to entertain without being too predictable, which is quite good for a zombie film really.

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7 hours ago, glb said:

I enjoyed Don't Breathe as a bit of escapism, but the set-up is pretty contrived. As a result didn't really care about anyone involved (well, you can root for the blind man until the thing with the thing happens I suppose), which undermines the finale somewhat.

 

Yeah i wasnt rooting for any of them, and the ending was terrible i thought.

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Don't breathe was easily the best jumpy horror I saw last year. Got the Kojima mark of approval too he loved it. "Pretty good" massively undersells train to Busan which destroys Hollywoods recent output by miles. Boldest act3 I've seen in years.

 

 

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Been watching my horror movies with headphones recently, with the volume cranked up loud.   Really makes a difference to 'jump' styled horror movies in particular.  Watched Insidious 3 recently, and the final scene almost made me crap myself, even though you can see it coming a mile off.  I wasn't expecting to, but really enjoyed that film overall.

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5 hours ago, clippa said:

Yeah, the babadook was very overrated, I thought. Good as in 3/5, but all the critics wet their knickers over it for some reason. Critics can be weird with horror films, the excellent ones can get pilloried and the mediocre ones praised.

 

Critics are weird with documentaries as well, regardless of quality, they tend to get a very easy ride. I've seen many fuck-awful documentaries in my time that all got above 90% on rottentomatoes.

"Dear Zachary" is one that instantly springs to mind. That just left we feeling angry at the amateur, manipulative, sensationalist, mawkish pricks who made it.

Cropsey is another one that feels like a stretched out, bad show you'd see deep down in the channel list late at night and these sorts of things get a free pass because a documentary is seen as more worthy or something?

It's all down to personal taste in the end though, isn't it? I mean, I know that's stating the obvious, but for me The Babadook was a 5/5 film, as was The Witch. Both films critics love but which are divisive when it comes to the 'normal' viewing public. I'd be interested to know which excellent ones you think get pilloried because in general I think people are too lenient with horror films, and not enough of them get pilloried. But again, that's my personal taste which might be very different to yours.

 

I completely agree about Cropsey though.

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1 minute ago, angel said:

So if I hated the witch, I'd not like Babadook?

 

The two films have nothing in common other than both being great and, as Scribblor, points out, well received by crtiics. I am surprised that so many dislike Babadook as I do not recall it being particularly divisive when it was released.

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I tend to like a reasonable level of tying up at the end, and (no spoilers please), I've heard Babadook leaves a little too much open to interpretation.  The Witch I just didnt enjoy, it was like a fly on the wall documentary with aspects of horror and I hated the ending. Plus of course, Finchy.

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Well, both The Witch and Babadook can be taken as literal straight up horror tales or they can be seen as heavily allegorical (which I favour) so I guess both leave space for interpretation/discussion. But, that's a good thing, surely? @angel]

 

But, hating The Witch should definitely not be a barrier to enjoying The Babadook as I realise that The Witch is definitely a harder sell to many folk..

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I do like interpretation as in multiple angles on things, the Blair Witch time travel stuff, the end of Martyrs, I love all that. I don't like things that barely show anything happen because it's all meant to be in your mind. The Witch felt like you could argue that a lot of it didn't even happen, and I hate that.

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1 hour ago, Mike S said:

 

The two films have nothing in common other than both being overrated and, as Scribblor, points out, well received by crtiics. I am surprised that so many dislike Babadook as I do not recall it being particularly divisive when it was released.

 

Fixed

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2 hours ago, angel said:

I do like interpretation as in multiple angles on things, the Blair Witch time travel stuff, the end of Martyrs, I love all that. I don't like things that barely show anything happen because it's all meant to be in your mind. The Witch felt like you could argue that a lot of it didn't even happen, and I hate that.

 

I can see how the ambiguity of The Witch could be off putting and as a straight horror story it's period setting, and slowish pace, requires a little commitment so  I much prefer the other interpretation:

 

Spoiler

There is much more, genuine, real world horror in The Witch if seen as the story of a family under huge environmental stress, eking out a living on the edge of the 'civilised world', far from their homeland, all whilst trying to reconcile the hardships they suffer with the wishes of their fervently believed in God.

 

The film offers at least one direct suggestion, in a shot of the blighted maize crop, that the witch, Black Philip, etc, are all hallucinations magnified by paranoia, fear, and religious terror. As the tale of how a harsh, frontier, environment can act as a catalyst to the sort of hysteria that lead to such horrors as the witch trials of the period I think the film is sensational but, as a fairly tale type horror film it is much less satisfactory...

 

But, horses for courses of course and I would not let a dislike of The WItch deter you from watching The Babadook..

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20 hours ago, clippa said:

 

You've put me on the spot there, I can't even remember what I had for dinner. Martyrs is the one that immediately springs to mind. An excellent horror movie whichever way you slice it and critics got very sniffy about that film.

 

I think "torture porn" is a very dismissive description, it never felt stylised or titillating, it was all soul crushingly real. It was straight up torture.

 

A horror film that truly horrified me into paralyses. To me, that's a great horror film.

 

The Witch was my favourite film of 2016 and one of the best horror films I've seen in ages. The Babadook I thought was good but I was surprised at the critical praise for it that I read afterwards, it wasn't that good I don't think.

 

Anyone looking for a couple of recommendations, not brand new or straight up horror films but they're both excellent.

 

Sleep Tight

Tony

In a Glass Cage

 

Tony is brilliant. Its essentially a very English Angst.

 

For horror that isn't labelled horror, look no further than Michael:

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1906426/

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Just saw the new Blair Witch, my lord what a load of garbage. I can't even begin to describe, just trash.

 

Also saw "It Follows" last night - good soundtrack and creepy shots that always make it seem like something is watching. Bit confusing, sort of - and mildly underdeveloped plot but good all the same. Creepy atmosphere and lots of drawn out shots, and they dont rely on any jumpscares - even if youre expecting it 99% of the time.

 

Gunna watch Kairo/Pulse - im a fan of internet-related Horror films. That one that was all done on Skype recently was really good, "Unfriended" - cliche story and acting but the way it was shot it was very believable and that was enough of immersion for me to be hooked.

 

I want to watch The VVitch but I'm not a fan of religious-inspired Horror films, or horrof ilms with a prevailing religious theme. Though I heard this ones real good.

 

23 hours ago, clippa said:

 

You've put me on the spot there, I can't even remember what I had for dinner. Martyrs is the one that immediately springs to mind. An excellent horror movie whichever way you slice it and critics got very sniffy about that film.

 

I think "torture porn" is a very dismissive description, it never felt stylised or titillating, it was all soul crushingly real. It was straight up torture.

 

A horror film that truly horrified me into paralyses. To me, that's a great horror film.

 

The Witch was my favourite film of 2016 and one of the best horror films I've seen in ages. The Babadook I thought was good but I was surprised at the critical praise for it that I read afterwards, it wasn't that good I don't think.

 

Anyone looking for a couple of recommendations, not brand new or straight up horror films but they're both excellent.

 

Sleep Tight

Tony

In a Glass Cage

 

I first watched Martyrs about 5 years ago after hearing all the drama about it being super violent and that. Maybe it's the fact we we're trying to train a dog to sit at the same time but I never found it so horrific it paraylzed me - I've watched it a few times since and it's a little scary, sad, and has a very dour theme of course - like one of the most continuously depressing movies (Serbian Film says hi).

 

Maybe the internet has numbed me, but I never flinched one at any of the scenes, just fascinated - especially at the end. Haven't seen the US remake, I wonder how tame it is?

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One recent low budget horror film that never gets mentioned is The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh. It's not scary per se but certainly one of the more interesting and accomplished examples of recent years (although I know a few that found it ponderous).

 

In an age where horror is reliant on cheap tricks and loud noises it is refreshing to see a film take a different approach. Rodrigo Gudiño’s The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh is such a film. An ambiguous slow burn chiller that relies on atmosphere and teasing intrigue rather than jump scares or exaggerated violence. It’s almost an old fashioned approach to the genre and a welcome one to boot.

 

It is an intimately focused film about a man who inherits a house from his estranged mother. The home is stuffed with strange ornaments, religious iconography and ominous statues of angels. Over the course of the night the son is confronted with his past and the belief that his mother’s spirit is attempting to communicate with him.

To divulge more of the plot would ruin an absorbing and tragic story filled with longing and loneliness. The ghosts that haunt this house are memories rather than monsters and even when Gudiño relies on the familiar trappings of the genre it is always in service of the story and its themes of lost faith and family. With meticulous set decoration (the house is very much a character in its own right) and an evocative roaming camera its technical accomplishments belie its limited resources.

 

Gudiño nails the film’s creeping melancholia from the opening minutes gently teasing the film’s plot and the estranged relationship at its heart. Led by a wonderfully judged narration from Vanessa Redgrave (voice-overs are typically mood killers in horror but the hopelessness and fragility in her words adds immeasurably to the atmosphere) and anchored by a strong solo performance from Aaron Poole, the film spins two separate perspectives on the one story to great effect.

 

The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh is a genuinely haunting haunted house chiller.

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36 minutes ago, clippa said:

I went in totally blind, I hadn't heard anything about it at all so I was expecting your average run of the mill slight and throwaway horror film, feel a little anxious, a few jump scares, get down tonight. I wasn't prepared for any of it.


I remember watching inside around about the same time and that had the same effect on me. I was literally gripping the arm of the chair when it was all over, quivering and said out loud with a big grin on my face "Fucking hell!"

 

Yeah unfriended's not bad at all is it? I totally agree with everything you said. It's flawed but you can't deny that it's entertaining and fun and that's good for me.

It follows is really good, as is the norm, let's itself down at the end but it's a really good modern horror film.

 

Yeah, threads is great, really really bleak though. If you haven't seen that, save it for when you're feeling more than perky otherwise it might tip you over the edge.

 

 

With all that I said about Martyrs it's probably the best film I have seen that has that amount of violence/gore - it had a good story and acting. It was very effective and not just 'torture porn' like clearly Saw2+ are (I love Saw 1, the rest are literally crap) I havent seen Hostel but the thought of penis-cutting makes me shiver. I don't find gore an aspect that pulls me to a film unless it's used in a creative way like Martyrs.

 

But yeh I guess if you hadn't heard about it before the creepy girl skin pulling and constant abuse and torture theme would be like woah.

 

Also saw the Descent recently... err, it's okay I suppose. A bit dissapointed by the dumb character choices "Oh im a first time explorer, thought I'd trick you all to go to this undocumented tunnel instead LOL" so I couldn't feel bad for them. I am pretty claustrophobic but this film didn't effect me too much - a few scenes of them stuck in tiny tunnels is hard to watch, though I thought the recent Blair Witch had a more effective tunnel scene.

 

Is Inside any good?

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I watched that Evil Dead remake the other day. It works in the sense that it doesn't stray too far from the original. It seems to be a little darker than that film, which was always played straighter than the sequel, but it does step a little into Evil Dead 2 territory by the end. There is something about the setting and story, simple as it is, that really works.

 

I was surprised to hear there were no CGI effects in the movie. It certainly convinces; I had to peek through my fingers a little at some of the gore scenes.

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On 09/01/2017 at 20:02, Mentazm said:

I read The Witch as a straight up ergot hallucination caused by ingesting their rotten wheat.

The Babadook is good, but not a horror in the traditional sense which let many down.

 

I'd say The Babadook isn't a horror in the modern sense, but fits much better with more traditional (or possibly just older) horror films like The Shining or Rosemary's Baby or Don't Look Now.

 

On 09/01/2017 at 17:06, angel said:

So if I hated the witch, I'd not like Babadook?

 

No, not at all. I mean, you might not like it, but that won't be because you didn't like The Witch. I just mentioned both of them because they were hugely popular with reviewers and far more divisive with the viewing public, with people saying they weren't 'proper' horror films.

 

On 09/01/2017 at 19:25, clippa said:

 

You've put me on the spot there, I can't even remember what I had for dinner. Martyrs is the one that immediately springs to mind. An excellent horror movie whichever way you slice it and critics got very sniffy about that film.

 

I think "torture porn" is a very dismissive description, it never felt stylised or titillating, it was all soul crushingly real. It was straight up torture.

 

A horror film that truly horrified me into paralyses. To me, that's a great horror film.

 

The Witch was my favourite film of 2016 and one of the best horror films I've seen in ages. The Babadook I thought was good but I was surprised at the critical praise for it that I read afterwards, it wasn't that good I don't think.

 

Anyone looking for a couple of recommendations, not brand new or straight up horror films but they're both excellent.

 

Sleep Tight

Tony

In a Glass Cage

 

I've not seen Martyrs, so I can't comment on it.

 

Torture porn - or 'straight up torture', as you put it - films really aren't my thing though. I've never seen one I've enjoyed even a tiny bit. I don't find them engaging or scary or interesting. I'm not squeamish at all, so the torture itself doesn't bother me, but something about them just doesn't click with me. It's like those misery memoir books that were incredibly popular (and maybe still are) where people write about the horrible abuse and neglect they suffered as children. I just can't understand what possible desire anyone could have to read them, or what they get out of them other than being thankful that it wasn't them (and I'm already thankful I had a good childhood).

 

I feel the same about torture films. It's obviously a subjective thing, since they're so popular, but they leave me absolutely cold. If they make me feel anything at all, it's just vaguely depressed.

 

It's odd, thinking about it. The horror films I really like are ones where there's a slow relentless build up of dread and a sense of malignant or uncaring powers or forces that we can't understand or control at play (the build up has to be slow, because the second you see whatever the antagonist is, the film always, always goes to shit). But in many ways, the torture films have that, it's just that the 'powers' are human rather than supernatural. And in many of the supernatural films I like, there's also an alternate, mundane explanation that's as plausible as the supernatural one.

 

It's entirely possible I'm misremembering this, but I read something years ago that separated horror and terror into separate genres, and horror was the visceral reaction to something disgusting or scary having happened, whereas terror was the fear you feel before it happens. Based on that definition, if I've remembered it correctly, I like terror, but don't like horror very much.

 

4 hours ago, buizel said:

Just saw the new Blair Witch, my lord what a load of garbage. I can't even begin to describe, just trash.

 

Also saw "It Follows" last night - good soundtrack and creepy shots that always make it seem like something is watching. Bit confusing, sort of - and mildly underdeveloped plot but good all the same. Creepy atmosphere and lots of drawn out shots, and they dont rely on any jumpscares - even if youre expecting it 99% of the time.

 

 

On 07/01/2017 at 18:01, Sane said:

I watched the new Blair witch yesterday. Doesn't do anything the original didn't do better. A shame because there is potential for a good sequel.

I've just finished watching it. I thought it was utter, utter tosh that didn't make sense even within its own mythology. I agree that the first one was better, and I thought that was shit.

 

I thought It Follows was brilliant for the first half, and then the quality dropped. I didn't dislike the ending particularly, but the swimming pool part really irritated me.

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i made the mistake of convincing the Mrs to watch Martyrs with me when it came out, she still talks about it to this day.  If that movie doesn't desensitise you, then nothing will.   Not the most wife-friendly film, I should have learnt my lesson by asking her to watch Irreversible...  

 

There was a number of films released around the same sort of time that stood out for being particularly nasty.  Haute Tension (High Tension) is one of my favourites of all, despite the divisive ending. Inside as mentioned above, Frontieres was an entertaining blend of many horror genres.   

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