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The Smoking and BBQ thread


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I'm not totally in line with the US trends on BBQing so find the whole array of sauces and rubs a bit OTT and not what I really like about BBQ.

 

For BBQ sauce I like Red's and hard to go wrong with Bad Byrons Butt Rub - I've spent a lot on assorted comp winning rubs and think its a typical US exercise in marketing and being on 'teams'.

 

The lumpwood I use and quality of charcoal is far more important as what I really love is slow cook falling apart tender meat with a nice hint of smoke on it - there is novelty factor to taking a rib and smothering in mustard, rub, butter, honey etc but can you really taste the pork at the end of it ?

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25 minutes ago, Gotters said:

I'm not totally in line with the US trends on BBQing so find the whole array of sauces and rubs a bit OTT and not what I really like about BBQ.

 

 

I know what you mean. In particular I'm not liking the heavy bark thing that seems to end up black in colour although I haven't tried it yet so I'll reserve final judgement until I do. But in that vein, I'm going to put a whole bone-in shoulder of 5 year old mutton on today and I'm only going to put salt on it. I might wrap it at some point but only if it looks like it needs it. I'm also not going to smoke it. I'm thinking 250F/120C cooking temp (will be trying out my new ThermPro TP20!) and just taking it off when the internal temp says it should be medium well. What do you think? All advice most welcome!

Maybe I should go for well done with mutton? :mellow:

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not cooked mutton but sounds a plan as long as there is enough fat to keep it moist, that should be lovely and tender cooked low like that with all the internal fat and connective bits rendered out and the collagen melted and in the meat. 

 

I've done a few big bone in pork shoulders and never needed to wrap, its often a technique to speed up cooking if stalling or to stop bark forming and the meat drying out if doing a long brisket or smaller ribs.

 

take pics !

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1 minute ago, Gotters said:

not cooked mutton but sounds a plan as long as there is enough fat to keep it moist, that should be lovely and tender cooked low like that with all the internal fat and connective bits rendered out and the collagen melted and in the meat. 

 

I've done a few big bone in pork shoulders and never needed to wrap, its often a technique to speed up cooking if stalling or to stop bark forming and the meat drying out if doing a long brisket or smaller ribs.

 

take pics !

Thanks Gotters, much appreciated. I will take pics, no matter how it turns out. This is just one of a series of experiments I'm trying out as a learning experience so I'm fully expecting some disasters, although I'm hoping this one turns out nice as it is a pretty pricey hunk o' meat. Bit nervous!

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if you haven't just read up on the 'stall' - its when big bits of meat hit a temp and don't budge up, sometimes for quite some time - its quite normal and unless you're cooking to a deadline not a time to crank up the heat.

 

good luck

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4 minutes ago, Gotters said:

if you haven't just read up on the 'stall' - its when big bits of meat hit a temp and don't budge up, sometimes for quite some time - its quite normal and unless you're cooking to a deadline not a time to crank up the heat.

 

good luck

 

I have read about that and will bear it in mind, thanks. I'll just stick to my chosen cooking temp and allow the monitor to tell me when it's ready I think. Lazy barbecuing ftw! 

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Well, it was to be a learning exercise and I learned some things. :D

1. The thermometer on the lid of the Weber is all but useless. It showed as much as a 70F higher reading than the grill level probe. No doubt correct for where it's situated, it's just situated in a useless position.

2. On a related note, a meat/grill probe is essential and I really enjoyed the TP20's maiden voyage. 

3. Just because the probe said I'd reached well done status, doesn't mean it was time to take the meat off. I was getting worried it would be dried out if I left it, but it was absolutely the most saturated with juices thing I've ever seen and much as we enjoyed it for dinner, I think it would have benefited from being on another hour or three. Cook time was approx 3 1/2 hours.

 

Anyway, I promised pics.

Raw.thumb.jpg.671451cc7ea0e8f669b4c6713661648c.jpg

1820616510_Onthebbq.thumb.jpg.e965944dedfa20c9f17b8aa4f389ad7f.jpgCooked2.thumb.jpg.740d6a2d77897a1552a07ece95d5ddeb.jpg

 

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I’m practically vegetarian these days and it’s literally the food of this thread that prevents me fully committing to it - looks amazing @Blue

 

With the slow n sear I’ve found if you are doing a very long smoke (I’ve gone 18 hours on mine) I will fill the water trough at the start of the smoke but not refill it, I think it helps with the initial smoke but it’s long gone for the bark forming part of the cook!

 

I very badly need to slowly cook some pork belly about now....

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I haven't done a pork belly in a couple of years, its amazing, I put it on a tray of veg with cider poured in and then cook low and slow for hours, last one was bout 8-9h I think.

 

All the fat renders out and you hit high heat at the end to crisp up the crackling - you just get this most gorgeous silky meat and glass like crackling, I'm drooling at the thought of it and it needs to happen soon !

 

 

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1 hour ago, Shimmyhill said:

I’m practically vegetarian these days and it’s literally the food of this thread that prevents me fully committing to it - looks amazing @Blue

 

With the slow n sear I’ve found if you are doing a very long smoke (I’ve gone 18 hours on mine) I will fill the water trough at the start of the smoke but not refill it, I think it helps with the initial smoke but it’s long gone for the bark forming part of the cook!

 

I very badly need to slowly cook some pork belly about now....

 

Thanks Shimmy, nice of you to say but I have it down as a fail as it really did need at least another hour or two. valuable lesson learned though and it was fun. 

8 minutes ago, Gotters said:

I haven't done a pork belly in a couple of years, its amazing, I put it on a tray of veg with cider poured in and then cook low and slow for hours, last one was bout 8-9h I think.

 

All the fat renders out and you hit high heat at the end to crisp up the crackling - you just get this most gorgeous silky meat and glass like crackling, I'm drooling at the thought of it and it needs to happen soon !

 

 

The veg raises it above the cider or you allow it to sit in the cider? I just happen to have a big slab of pork belly in the fridge. :D 

 

My next cook will be pulled pork. Lots of nice examples of that in this thread from which I have taken notes! 

 

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yeah the veg sits the meat up above the liquid and imparts some lovely fumes up into the grill - think it was an old BBQ Pit Boys youtube video and one of the first things I did when I got a Primo - its a basic veg layer of carrot celery and onion I think. 

 

another great tip to make your garden smell amazing is chuck an old onion you have in the fridge direct into the coals, the smell is just incredible.

 

the fatty cuts of meat at a low to moderate temp are incredibly user friendly, you can sit them there for an hour or two extra with no real detriment, or if done early foil wrap tightly then wrap that in towels, amazing how long they can keep their heat for, you really benefit from that time though as the fat hits a point of rendering into the meat and don't get big chewy bits of it left.

 

you really want that time for proper pulled pork, its not ripped up roast slices of pork, it should shred with forks into strands. so often you see it and its too dry as just been roasted, not properly rendered down to pulled.

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21 minutes ago, Gotters said:

you really want that time for proper pulled pork, its not ripped up roast slices of pork, it should shred with forks into strands. so often you see it and its too dry as just been roasted, not properly rendered down to pulled.

 

Yes, that's what I'll be aiming for. I'm determined it's not coming off the grill until it's over 200F internally.

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Checking for temp is good, but don’t forget to feel it as well. How easy does the probe go in? If you poke it with your finger can you see it starting to come apart?

 

My only fail with pork is when I took it off based on temp and wrapped it as it was done early. An hour or so later I unwrapped it to pull at the table and it wouldn’t pull at all. I ended up having to carve it instead. 

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1 minute ago, Jonny5 said:

Checking for temp is good, but don’t forget to feel it as well. How easy does the probe go in? If you poke it with your finger can you see it starting to come apart?

 

My only fail with pork is when I took it off based on temp and wrapped it as it was done early. An hour or so later I unwrapped it to pull at the table and it wouldn’t pull at all. I ended up having to carve it instead. 

 

Very good to know, thank you. I'll be sure to give it a good poking.

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yeah BBQ is an art not a total science - internal temp important but so is the individual joint and how it got to that temp (quickly or slowly), you can hit a temp fast but the meat will not be the same as taking time. 

 

also you can take it off a few degrees under then wrap/rest - it will carry over cook up to the desired temp and the juices should settle back into the fibres of the meat

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4 minutes ago, Gotters said:

yeah BBQ is an art not a total science - internal temp important but so is the individual joint and how it got to that temp (quickly or slowly), you can hit a temp fast but the meat will not be the same as taking time. 

 

 

Makes sense, thanks. I'll try to do a good assessment of the raw joint and will be cooking it low and slow for sure. I've seen videos recommending anything between 225F/107C and 275F/135C so I'm thinking 250F/120C until it pokes like butter. 

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Pulled pork day!

Trimmed the joint, put a little mustard on it to hold the rub, liberally applied magic dust and stuck it on the grill with some apple wood and ran it at 120C for 2 hours then spritzed it with 50/50 apple juice/apple cider vinegar every 30 mins until it hit 71C internal. Wrapped it and waited for it to hit 93C internal. Poked it all over and there was no resistance. 7 hour cook, which surprised me as it wasn't a huge joint. Rested 45 mins. It was super moist and soft, fell apart as I pulled it and tasted rather nice with some of the Shotgun Red's sauce I made.  

1962234288_OnGrill.thumb.jpg.316e66efb5c21ba0481599561a5f8203.jpg

Unwrapping.thumb.jpg.bec8e6d80de953d28c8bba47bf1c8623.jpg

Pulled.thumb.jpg.dbd8e3c7bd5329688debf61657291e05.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Jonny5 said:

Looks fantastic.  I love pulled pork. :wub:

Thanks, was quite pleased for my first attempt. Having said I was dubious about the whole black looking bark thing, I'm a convert now that I've tried it. It looks burnt but it's not, some kind of voodoo magic! 

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  • 4 weeks later...

first BBQ of the year yesterday using our mini Kamado - bit of faff for the first cook as I'd left it with charcoal in over winter so there is a bit of dampness in there and some mystery moss to get rid of, nothing a good blast with the turbo charged electric hairdryer lighter thing to get the coals going and a burn for 400c for half an hour couldn't take care of to get it all looking as good as new.

 

rescued some freezer burgers so a simple first cook but nice to get the smell of charcoal and grilling meat going again

 

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  • 1 month later...

So we’re redoing our garden and I’m thinking of replacing the gas Weber for something else. Looking for something that sits on a counter top. 

 

I’m thinking of just getting a v basic cast iron grill for charcoal and a versatile oven alongside it. Ideally would be one thing that does it all. The Gozney Dome looks great but I guess you can’t grill in that. 
 

Can anyone recommend anything?  The space would look a bit like this. 

 

8124B986-85B2-48FC-A125-DF4544AA30FB.jpeg.49690aa1cd9887b4f70cb39c8f5fc7b4.jpeg

 

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